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Formerly 45yroldNewbie
08-29-2007, 17:21
I was reading an article about approaching marine animals and it mentioned that your light could spook some snimals deeper into their holes and crevices if it was too bright. Makes sense. I was talking to a dive shop owner about lights and he reccomended one that could light up New York! Also makes sense for cave and wreck penetration dives.

I don't think I would be a cave diver, certainly not anytime soon. I might venture into wreck penetrations in a couple years once I have some more experience, so that leaves me with watching the fish and looking for marine life. Which will probably be my primary type of diving anyway.

Do different lights have different intensity built in or are they all pretty much on/off? What type/Brand/etc light should I be looking for?

Thanks in advance!

in_cavediver
08-29-2007, 18:43
I was reading an article about approaching marine animals and it mentioned that your light could spook some snimals deeper into their holes and crevices if it was too bright. Makes sense. I was talking to a dive shop owner about lights and he reccomended one that could light up New York! Also makes sense for cave and wreck penetration dives.

I don't think I would be a cave diver, certainly not anytime soon. I might venture into wreck penetrations in a couple years once I have some more experience, so that leaves me with watching the fish and looking for marine life. Which will probably be my primary type of diving anyway.

Do different lights have different intensity built in or are they all pretty much on/off? What type/Brand/etc light should I be looking for?

Thanks in advance!

Here's a good suggestion. Get two lights. Get a brighter light, saw 4c or so as a 'primary' light for night diving etc when you want more light. Then pickup a 2AA or 4AA light as a backup and for the 'lesser' light. This also has the side benefit of giving a backup light in case of failure when doing night dives. You ought to be able to get these both for less than $50.

Some will definitely steer you toward the big 10, 21, 24 + watt HID's and frankly, for what you describe, you don't need one. (if you want one, by all means, I have several can lights). One argument given is team signaling in one 'popular' dive philosophy during the daytime. I personally disagree on this. (making to much work out of diving)

Charlotte Smith
08-29-2007, 18:58
Depends on the vis....here in Arkansas a big light is much better because the vis is low but in the ocean I can't imagine to big of a light unless your deep or diving at night.....

in_cavediver
08-29-2007, 20:36
Depends on the vis....here in Arkansas a big light is much better because the vis is low but in the ocean I can't imagine to big of a light unless your deep or diving at night.....

I don't know about that. I did a lot of night dives in 5' or less vis with a UK SL4 and managed to live through it and actually enjoy it. I bought a 10 watt HID later and after doing lots more dives, I sometimes prefer the 'lesser' light as its more enjoyable. You dive at night to be dark, not to light the place up as if it was daytime...

Different experience. Simple as that.

ScubaToys Larry
08-29-2007, 20:57
I like having a lot of light... I use on of the HID UK Light Canons - and love it. But it is true what they say - if you nail a night critter at close range, they may run from you. But if you just work on your light technique - it's not that much of a problem. When night diving, I hang about 10 foot above the reef, shining a bit ahead of me - maybe at about a 45 degree angle. Then while scanning around, if I see something, I right away move my light to the side of it so it is illuminated by the "halo" and not the "hot spot" of the light.

That seems to work well for me. I normally find more stuff than anyone else out there - might be the light, might be I've got tons of night dives... might be I'm just lucky!

scubasamurai
08-30-2007, 09:16
i have a c4 and a ikelite back up and did some very dark sink hole diving at 100 ft and wish i had more. than i have an instructor ( sick pup) who makes you turn your lights off and use the available light around you, but at 100ft in that sink hole no such thing in my eyes. that another night dive people had some many lights i could see for yards without even using my light system. so personal depends on the are you dive. dark sinkhole give me everything that looks and shines like the sun, but out in clear water visablility 80plus ft than a c4 even c8 would be fine with a glowstick to find the body when the shark gets pissed you blinded him!!!!

greyzen
08-30-2007, 12:19
when/if I get more into night dive's I'm going to copycat Larry and get one of his light-cannons.

Until then, duel UK SL6's baby!

scubasamurai
08-30-2007, 12:54
i need a couple of more posts to help with the light cannon cost though!!!

Vercingetorix
08-30-2007, 13:59
An instructor mentioned to me a couple weeks ago concerning dive lights: buy the brightest, biggest, baddest light you can afford. Then buy your primary.

boarder06
09-08-2007, 20:27
I noticed the Germans *always* have the biggest and brightest dive lights and their DIY lights are always better than anything you can buy. If you get stuck with a bunch of Germans you practically don't need a light yourself. They will light up the place for you :-).

I found that many remote places have really crappy lights they rent out for night dives. Issue is not so much the amount of light they put out, but reliability. Thus, several years ago I decided to carry my own light and I bought a UK light canon on sale and, other than the weight, I was pretty happy with it.
I recently switched to the Nocturnal Lights (http://www.nocturnallights.com) LED light, which will fix the weight issue. LED technology just wasn't there a few years ago.

lmorin
09-11-2007, 12:12
If you are diving in an opaque environment, buy something powerful. But, in my experience with clear water, powerful lights are often overkill. Softer, broader beam lights are the way to go, if you ask me, particularly if you are getting close to the reel and looking for creepy crawly little things. You don't have to spend a lot to see a lot.

brandon
09-11-2007, 12:49
UK Light Cannon + SL4.

Great light combo. Was a little better value before they jacked the price up a few years ago, but it isn't too bad.

-B.

ScaredSilly
09-11-2007, 13:03
I have a small UK light that I put a red filter over. I used it at the aquarium that I was volunteering at to point out critters. It worked great. Never used it while diving but image it would work just as good.

I currently use a UK SL4 which is a nice compromise of good light vs compact size. Easy to clip off or store in a pocket. It can be used for night dives as well though I like my UK 1200 for that.

divingmedic
09-11-2007, 16:37
I just bring a whimpy light and hang out with every one that has those huges expensive light, turn my off and enjoy theirs.