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View Full Version : Tips for Plantar Fascia??



cutter77
10-21-2009, 02:15
Plantar fascia and high arches...........what a "pain".

Would appreciate any tips on dealing with it since I'll be hoofing it through the airports pretty soon.

Had a cortisone injection a year ago and that helped a lot but a little gunshy about doing that again...reading conflicting info on effects.

keyshunter
10-21-2009, 05:06
Over the years, I have had several bouts with plantar fasciaitis. Best long term relief I found was custom orthotics, followed closely by otc gel arch inserts.

Lulubelle
10-21-2009, 05:14
Orthotics, good supportive shoes, a strasborg sock (can get at some athletic stores...Athlete's Foot is where I got mine) to wear at night, a strap/belt that you can use to do a good stretch before you get out of bed.

snagel
10-21-2009, 05:40
My assistant has this problem and went through the injections and spent a ton of money on special shoe inserts. In the end, she told me she uses a small ball to stretch out the tendon occasionally and it seems to help the best. She says it hurts at first but when she starts getting flare-ups she puts the ball on the ground and steps on it rolling it back and forth until the tendon gets stretched out.

Snagel

Cheddarchick
10-21-2009, 17:05
I feel your pain...If I don't do stretches before I step out of bed I come crashing down with the pain. If I do them, it is only a dull ache...My question is if God had made us bare footed, why do we get plantar fasciaitis forcing us into hard soled inserts??? Weren't we built to be bare footed???

Tekdivr
10-21-2009, 20:41
I've worn hard soled orthotics for approx 20 years and they are a God send. Without them, I can barely stand up in the mornings. Highly recommend them and takes no time at all for them to take affect. Initial invest is approx $300 but well worth it. I've tried the boot, but not a fan.

Lulubelle
10-21-2009, 21:43
Here is the strassburg sock. The reason why using something like this is important is that your fascia tightens right back up at night when your foot is relaxed. Then when you get up and try to stand on it in the morning, it literally rips all of those little muscles again and it hurts like a @E#$!

Stretching the foot before you get out of bed is very helpful too. You can use anything, a belt, a rope, a band, just pull the foot towards you and hold it to stretch things out before you stand.

You can also stretch against a wall, on a slanted surface, a stair if you are careful but it is not ideal as it is easy to overstretch.

And for me the orthotics were helpful too. And wearing granola shoes (the horror of it) like mephistos and birks.

Not a fan of steroid injections. They can cause necrosis of the fat pad in the heel. I did it once, because it was so bad I couldn't make it through my workday just walking. But then I got more disciplined about the other stuff and eventually it got better.

Cheddarchick, I hear you. And it may be that a contributor to the problem is underdeveloped muscles in the foot, who knows. But once you HAVE PF, the orthotics are pretty important. And some of us have feet designed to hold 90 pounds of girl and are not 90 pound girls so the feet take a special beating.

THE STRASSBURG SOCK - [A simple cost effective treatment for plantar fasciitis heel pain] (http://www.thesock.com/)

Tekdivr
10-21-2009, 22:17
Here is the strassburg sock. The reason why using something like this is important is that your fascia tightens right back up at night when your foot is relaxed. Then when you get up and try to stand on it in the morning, it literally rips all of those little muscles again and it hurts like a @E#$!

Stretching the foot before you get out of bed is very helpful too. You can use anything, a belt, a rope, a band, just pull the foot towards you and hold it to stretch things out before you stand.

You can also stretch against a wall, on a slanted surface, a stair if you are careful but it is not ideal as it is easy to overstretch.

And for me the orthotics were helpful too. And wearing granola shoes (the horror of it) like mephistos and birks.

Not a fan of steroid injections. They can cause necrosis of the fat pad in the heel. I did it once, because it was so bad I couldn't make it through my workday just walking. But then I got more disciplined about the other stuff and eventually it got better.

Cheddarchick, I hear you. And it may be that a contributor to the problem is underdeveloped muscles in the foot, who knows. But once you HAVE PF, the orthotics are pretty important. And some of us have feet designed to hold 90 pounds of girl and are not 90 pound girls so the feet take a special beating.

THE STRASSBURG SOCK - [A simple cost effective treatment for plantar fasciitis heel pain] (http://www.thesock.com/)

The sock looks like it has the same action as the boot I wore, but much more sleep friendly! Thanks for the info!

Cheddarchick
10-22-2009, 06:47
I blame it all on flip flops.......I think my problems is all my life I have walked on my tiptoes...literally since I could walk I did it tippytoe....I think it made all the ligaments short....It's wierd. I can tell you the exact day I had my first flair up....

DivingCRNA
10-22-2009, 07:45
Yeah-Flip Flops are the dumbest shoe ever. I have no owned a pair, but my Mom has worn the dang things all my life and her feet really hurt.

For PF-Freeze a 20 oz. pop bottle full of water. then roll it with the sole of your bare foot back and forth on the floor. Also do the tennis ball thing mentioned and then have a pile of socks on the floor and move the pile back and forth one sock at a time with your toes.

I did these things and ran the Twin Cities Marathon with Plantar Faciitis. They work.

rmkrause
10-22-2009, 19:21
Orthotics, good supportive shoes, a strasborg sock (can get at some athletic stores...Athlete's Foot is where I got mine) to wear at night, a strap/belt that you can use to do a good stretch before you get out of bed.

I bought a Strasborg sock myself since I didn't like the idea of wearing the big bulky night splint booty. After a few weeks, I found the sock to be worthless. Soon after I started to see a podiatrist and she also said she found the Strasborg sock not effective among the patients she had seen use it. She said the mechanism is not the same since the sock mostly just pulls your toes up. Yes, this gives a stretch but is different from a hard platform that causes a state of dorsiflexion. What she said was more or less what I had concluded during the few weeks of use - it felt like it predominately pulled on your toes. I got a bulky splint booty shortly aftwards and while yes, annoying for a while to wear in bed due to the bulk, I found it a lot better.

rmkrause
10-22-2009, 19:23
I feel your pain...If I don't do stretches before I step out of bed I come crashing down with the pain. If I do them, it is only a dull ache...My question is if God had made us bare footed, why do we get plantar fasciaitis forcing us into hard soled inserts??? Weren't we built to be bare footed???

Sure, but how many of us in America spend most of our time walking barefoot on natural surfaces?

rmkrause
10-22-2009, 19:33
I've worn hard soled orthotics for approx 20 years and they are a God send. Without them, I can barely stand up in the mornings. Highly recommend them and takes no time at all for them to take affect. Initial invest is approx $300 but well worth it. I've tried the boot, but not a fan.

Personally I prefer my SOLE Signature Dean Karnazes Custom Footbeds to the custom ones my podiatrist made - cost wasn't such a huge factor for me personally since after insurance they were about the same cost but I found the support of the SOLES to be superior to my customs. My wife has also come to the same conclusion.

They cost about $40 online and the big thing about them is they are heat moldable - you stick them in the oven and then put them in your shoes and wear them for a few minutes and they conform to your feet. The concept works very well.

rmkrause
10-22-2009, 19:41
Other things to try are:

Drawing the alphabet in the air with your toes

Epsom salts - for a period of time afterwards I'd feel 100%. Then the pain would come back but at least it'd give me a short break

Physical Therapy - Stuff like Graston technique which is a metal bar that is rubbed on the feet. Had this done once, it hurts. ART (Active Release Technique) works for some people too

EPAT - Radial Shock Wave Therapy: a non-invasive technique that is best described as being like having a small precise jackhammer striking the bottom of your feet to cause micro-trauma to cause your body to heal itself. Yes, it hurts, but less than the Graston IMHO and the pain goes away almost immediately after the machine stops, and it's only a couple of minutes per foot.

ESWT - Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: Same thing they use to break up kidney stones how I understand it. This does require a local anesthesia and could be seen as being a step up from EPAT

Cheddarchick
10-23-2009, 17:28
Brutal....sounds simply brutal....we should all live barefoot on the beach....

theduckguru
10-24-2009, 19:36
Have some good shoes with good support.

If your feet are flat, consider getting some orthodics.

Stretch alot.

Aquatrax
10-24-2009, 19:47
Have some good shoes with good support.

If your feet are flat, consider getting some orthodics.

Stretch alot.

My wife had it and this is exactly how she got over the pain, still wears the inserts

EODiver
10-25-2009, 20:20
I had similar problems, and tried the stretching and everything. What worked best for me was a frozen water bottle rolled under my foot and wearing crocs when not at work.

At work I had to change boots for something different (Merrells). A combination of both fixed the problem for me.

Lulubelle
10-25-2009, 20:27
Good solid suggestions here. One thing I didn't see mentioned was modifying your activities. Plantar fasciitis is an overuse injury. So while you are trying these suggestions to make it better, it is important to avoid the activity that got you there to begin with. Doesn't mean you don't exercise, it just means you have to modify what you do.

I had a terrible case of it when I was running a lot. Part of getting better was running very little and getting on the bike and in the pool.

I had another bout of it after an extended medical leave. I jumped back into daily intense weight bearing exercise too soon and my foot freaked out. Back on the bike and back into the pool. I have a recumbent bike at home now because it is the one thing that I can do no matter how bad my foot is.

PF is tricky. It feels better and better as the day goes on. So you think, "I think I will go for a run." Then the next morning you get up and it is worse. Overuse.

Also, commit to ugly practical shoes until you are all better. That part really hurt my feelings, I am a shoe horse. But I have all sorts of granola shoes to kick around in on my casual time to keep my feet happy.

Good luck.

L

mrm777
10-28-2009, 22:12
Good tips here.... I was diagnosed with PF too. I got a pair of off the shelf orthodics for my high arches with foam heel lifts that go under them from my doctor, doing stretches about twice a day, trashed the flip flops for crocs, and wear only enclosed shoes and good ASICS now. Ibuprofen helped at first but don't like to take stuff so stopped that after a while and concentrated on other solutions such as just staying off the foot until it was better. Gained 3 lbs but back to walking and climbing hills for exercise now. Also doing the stretches after warming up a bit. Much better, and have learned not to chance it or push it.

(How does the frozen bottle exercise work??? sitting, standing, reps???)

Lulubelle
10-28-2009, 22:15
Just an update.... got a pair of off the shelf orthodics for my high arches with foam heel lifts that go under them from my doctor, doing stretches about twice a day, trashed the flip flops for crocs, and wear only enclosed shoes and good ASICS now. Ibuprofen helped at first but don't like to take stuff so stopped that after a while and concentrated on other solutions such as just staying off the foot until it was better. Gained 3 lbs but back to walking and climbing hills for exercise now. Also doing the stretches after warming up a bit. Much better, and have learned not to chance it or push it. Thanks for the tips.

(How does the frozen bottle exercise work??? sitting, standing, reps???)

Good that it is better! But please, ditch the crocs for now. They have been well proven to provide no real support. My little nephew is having to have corrective shoes now because he wore crocs and his arches fell. Will only stress your foot. Go granola for your slip on footwear and get some mephistos, birkenstocks, or if you really want to go ugly, durea. Those carved foot beds will give you great support.

mrm777
10-28-2009, 22:40
Ugly is good sometimes.

Lulubelle
10-28-2009, 23:04
Ugly is good sometimes.


Indeed, except when it comes to a person's character.

rmkrause
10-29-2009, 23:21
Good that it is better! But please, ditch the crocs for now. They have been well proven to provide no real support. My little nephew is having to have corrective shoes now because he wore crocs and his arches fell. Will only stress your foot. Go granola for your slip on footwear and get some mephistos, birkenstocks, or if you really want to go ugly, durea. Those carved foot beds will give you great support.

Honestly, provide references to the statement "no real support".

Crocs are certified by the U.S. Ergonomics Council and the American Podiatric Medical Association.

Crocs: Healthy Shoes or Just Comfy? (http://diabetes.webmd.com/features/crocs-healthy-shoes-just-comfy)

cutter77
11-01-2009, 19:21
Have had good luck with the Crocs....but I did get the RX type with higher arches and more heel padding. Just thankful I'm not going to need another cortisone shot.

cmburch
11-02-2009, 00:02
I spent hundreds in arch supports. Goodfeet $250? a waste of money for me; they are not even custom. I use them in my cycling shoes. I now use Birkenstock blue heeled arch supports. Much cheaper and available online. I have a high arch. Remember to always use them even around the house. I have been using Birkenstock high arch sandals around the home.

What works for me Birk Blue Heeled and Nike running shoes. The arch support goes under the shoe insert.

Lulubelle
11-02-2009, 05:09
I won't have time this week to look for a proof source other than what my nephew's podiatrist told us. He hates Crocs and says that they are good for his business. He is 4 years old, has lived in crocs, his arch has flattened, and he now has to go into corrective shoes.



Good that it is better! But please, ditch the crocs for now. They have been well proven to provide no real support. My little nephew is having to have corrective shoes now because he wore crocs and his arches fell. Will only stress your foot. Go granola for your slip on footwear and get some mephistos, birkenstocks, or if you really want to go ugly, durea. Those carved foot beds will give you great support.

Honestly, provide references to the statement "no real support".

Crocs are certified by the U.S. Ergonomics Council and the American Podiatric Medical Association.

Crocs: Healthy Shoes or Just Comfy? (http://diabetes.webmd.com/features/crocs-healthy-shoes-just-comfy)

WASP7000
12-04-2009, 12:53
Definitely some orthotics inserts in the shoes. I had that for a bit when I decided to run in flat shoes. After a couple weeks with inserts I was all good.

rmkrause
12-23-2009, 18:40
I ended up caving in to the cortisone shots - had 3 in each foot. Completely took care of the right foot but not so beneficial for the left foot. HOWEVER, after getting the shots I could finally do stretches and yoga without feeling like I was aggravating the condition. Now, I feel my left foot is finally making progress - it seems in my case I needed to get the inflammation down. Before, each stretch or yoga session seemed to poor gas on the fire.