PDA

View Full Version : Looking for some feedback on a wrist computer



bubble boy
08-31-2007, 04:18
I'm getting ready to head to Cozumel in a couple of months and I'm looking for a new dive computer. I have an Aeris now that I find very user UN-friendly!! I'm looking for something...well..user friendly. I saw an ad for the Oceanic Veo 100 wrist computer the other day and it apears to be just what the doctor ordered. I already have a compass and pressure guage from my current dive console that I would use, as it appears from what I've read that tank pressure is not an option on the Veo 100. I'm curious if anyone out there has some experience with this computer..I've tried to find a review on this model and can't seem to find one. Thanks in advance for the help

thor
08-31-2007, 08:57
Correct me if I'm wrong people, but I believe Aeris and Oceanic computers are made by the same manufacturer?

jpatmore
08-31-2007, 09:02
I have the veo 100 nx which is the new veo 100 with nitrox. I like it, it is really simple, and does everything you need for recreational diving. Just has one button ... so not much you can do wrong.

I also thought that Aeris and Oceanic had the same computers, just with their own branding and model numbers. Make sure the veo 100 is not just the oceanic version of the aeris one you dont like

Xspect
08-31-2007, 11:28
I think the aeris has slight bigger number display

scubasamurai
08-31-2007, 12:30
leaning towards the dive rite nitrex duo, seems like people like it the numbers are easy to read and you can use the buttons under water with mininal difficulty

ScubaToys Larry
08-31-2007, 12:59
A few thoughts just to confuse everyone here! :smiley2:

Yes, Aeris and Oceanic computers are really about the same computer - as are the Genesis / Sherwoods... All come from the same factory.

But; there are differences in the different models. So I don't know which Aeris the original poster has - but there probably is an equivelant oceanic. And a different model of the Aeris or Oceanic might be easier for him to use.

As far as the Dive rite... Guess what - that's not a Dive Rite computer. It's actually a Seiko. And the same computer is also sold under the Tusa name:

http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=IQ700

The difference being the Tusa has a free download of the software on their site (still have to buy the cable though) and comes with a 2 year instead of a one year warranty.

Charles R
08-31-2007, 14:00
I like the Tusa 800 it is a great computer and it will vibrate to alert you.

scubasamurai
08-31-2007, 14:30
well seen the story because of the download cable on your site. but i think the guys on binkii atoll have a different opinion as some of that ( opening up a can of worms i am sure)
personal i like to have all my equipment match,

willardj
08-31-2007, 20:20
I have the DR Duo. Just got it about 3 month's ago. I have about 25 dive's on it now and works great (good size #'s and BEEP'S at you when you are doing something you aren't suppose to do).. It's my first wrist mont and it took a lil getting use to.

bubble boy
09-01-2007, 07:36
:smiley20: I'm glad you like your Veo 100 nx..that's good to know...have you used it on many dives? Reason I ask...I just found a review that said that it quit on him after 2 dives...don't want that to happen to me!!!

Defman
09-01-2007, 08:31
I'm getting ready to head to Cozumel in a couple of months and I'm looking for a new dive computer. I have an Aeris now that I find very user UN-friendly!! I'm looking for something...well..user friendly. I saw an ad for the Oceanic Veo 100 wrist computer the other day and it apears to be just what the doctor ordered. I already have a compass and pressure guage from my current dive console that I would use, as it appears from what I've read that tank pressure is not an option on the Veo 100. I'm curious if anyone out there has some experience with this computer..I've tried to find a review on this model and can't seem to find one. Thanks in advance for the help


Not to confuse matters, but have you looked at the Mares wrist computers? I had a Surveyor Nitrox for a long time and liked it very much. I hear the M2 and Nemo are nice.

rktman26
09-01-2007, 17:00
I bought the Oceanic VEO 180nx from ST. I've used it 6 times. It's easy to use and understand. Overall, I'm very pleased with it.

Compass
09-01-2007, 19:15
Which wrist dive computer?
I just had to research this same question for myself and bought a computer just a few weeks ago.

Everyone's criteria is probably different.
Mine criteria were...
1) User changable batteries
2) Standard size batteries (easy to find anywhere)
3) Capable of Nitrox and multiple dives/multiple days
4) As inexpensive as possible

I found myself then looking at Mares M1, Mares M2, and Dacor Darwin.
After much research, I discovered that

A] all three use AAA batteries available everywhere
B] all three are user changable in the field using a coin to turn the latch
C] all three are Nitrox and multidive capable
D] all three sell for $180 to $280
E] the battery compartment is isolated from the computer compartment
F] additionally, all three allow you to plan a dive using your current nitrogen loading, so you don't go too deep or stay too long unawares. They also allow you to simulate a future dive or series of dives to see what your nitrogen loading and oxygen loading will be using your planned profiles for the day. Cool !!!

I finally bought the Dacor Darwin because I found it on sale for a $180, while the other two computers would have cost more. I would have been happy with any of the three.

The Details:

A] the Mares M1 and the Dacor Darwin have the same decompression algorithm, (Powell low bubble Haldanean model. Powell did/does doppler bubble detection and astronaut decompression research for NASA). The Haldanean models are empirically derived from animal testing followed by human trials at the turn of the century. The Haldanean goal was to get you to decompress you as fast as safely possible by maintaining as much difference between the gas pressure in your tissues and the gas pressure in the surrounding water. This means that the model has been proven to work within the limits that have been tested. These models have been modified through the years due to further research such as that done by NASA in the 1980's and 1990's.

B] Mares M2 uses a deep stop model trademarked as RGBM by Weinke. The dirty little secrets here are that there is not much difference from the M2 to the M1 and Darwin models until you get below 130 foot recreational depth, the deep stop is really just a 1 or 2 minute stop at somewhere around the midpoint between the deepest point and the first mandatory stop generated by the Haldanean models, and the VPM (Variable Permeability Model) generates essentially the same data and is used by many deep/cave tech divers. This is not to say that there is no value to this model, even Powell (NASA) says the deep stop has value. The VPM and Weinke models compute a depth at which at least one of your theoretical tissues is decompressing and stops you just above that point to reduce microbubble or bubble seed formation. If you do your deep stop at too deep a point, then you are not really decompressing at all, since below a certain depth, all of your tissues are still loading up nitrogen. This model is called the RGBM (Reduced Gradient Bubble Model) copyrighted by Weinke and it is essentially the previous VPM (based on the Modified Haldanean model) with one or more deep stops added to decrease the chances of decompression sickness. The practice of deep stop became fashionable after Pyle, a deep sea fish researcher and collector, reported feeling better when he stopped for a minute or two at approximately half his fish collection depth to deflate the fishes swim bladders with a syringe so that they would not explode (the ultimate decompression sickness). This is why deep stops are sometimes called Pyle Stops. However, if you stop too deep by blindly guessing at a target stop depth, you could end up just needlessly adding nitrogen loading and time to your decompression obligation schedule. Thus the reason for the VPM and RGBM models.

C] the Dacor Darwin and the Mares M2 have the same exact display. All three have the same case and two control buttons.

Dacor Darwin sells for about $200.
Mares M2 sells for about $280.
Mares and Dacor are both owned by Head, International and made in Italy.

Bring the Payne
09-09-2007, 16:43
I have been using the Oceanic Veo 250....no complaints thus far!

Tableleg
09-12-2007, 14:48
I've got about 6 dives on my new Oceanic Geo and have been very happy with it. The interface has taken some getting used to (it's a lot of holding two different buttons for a few seconds to access different menues) but it's really easy once you get the hang of it.

It's kinda a conversation starter though; Mine happens to have a serial number of 000007! I wonder where 1-6 are. :smiley1:

coralcrazed
09-15-2007, 11:50
Correct me if I'm wrong people, but I believe Aeris and Oceanic computers are made by the same manufacturer?


yes that is correct they are made by the same company... I belive palegic. not sure.

anyway I would recomend that you look at the geo by oceanic. Its nice but I have to admit I have yet to make up my mind on one myself.

Kidder
09-15-2007, 11:58
I love my Oceanic VT3. The buddy check air is cool. I also dicovered recently that I can change the settings easily with my computer. To me that is a super feature.

wkowalski
09-15-2007, 12:14
The biggest consideration for me was ease of use. I didn't want to spend the whole night before my trip relearning the features of my computer. I ended up with the Veo 250 (2 buttons). I would recommend you download the user manual for prospective computers and see exactly what you are getting.

redkev
09-15-2007, 17:21
I have had a very mixed run with dive computers over the past few years. I dive about 100 dives a year. Between me and my primary buddy Ms Redkev, I own 9 computers. Here is the rundown on successes and failures:

1 US Divers single button round (I no longer know the model name but made by the same US company that makes the Aeris etc. no nitrox. This computer failed after about 500 dives. Don't ever use these computers for decompression diving unless you know what you are doing. They give you lots of bottom time and then stick it to you with deco time. I don't think they make the one button model anymore but it was a pain to retrieve the dives. Once again I repeat, do not use these computers for deco diving

1 Suunto Favor still ticking after about 500 dives. Locked me out a few times over the years, don't push it or it will get mad. No nitrox. Had a dive master friend who owned one of these for about 10 years. She finally lost it on a wreck in the Red Sea after 3 thousand dives. She then went through 6 Suunto Mosquitos in about 1000 dives. Suunto did keep replacing them under warranty. When the last one failed they finally told her no more replacements so she bought a Suunto D9. Downside for her on the D9, no user replaceable batteries.

3 Mares M1s (2 with the RGBM algorithm, I think the other one had a different name). One failure out of the three, replaced once under warranty and no failures since then. Good computer especially the RGBM model. Do the stops and it will let you dive all day. The buttons are hard to push for some, although I find them no problem. Replacement wrist straps are hard to come by (Scubatoys said they could order them at nearly $20 bucks each), expensive and the design makes it somewhat difficult to make your own out of bungee cord. Uses AAA batteries which is why I purchased it in the first place. The batteries don't last long but you can get them everywhere. I may buy the M2. The M1 is big, ugly and just plain clunky but it is generally reliable and gets the job done. I carry two, one on my wrist and one hooked on my BC (strap is gone) as my back up. I have trusted my life to these on many occasions

2 Genesis Pros (round 2 button nitrox). Same crappy algorithm as the other US made round computers with excessive bottom time then LONG deco stops and, at least on my older versions, no intermediate stops. One catastrophic failure within the first 6 months of ownership. Bought overseas and Genesis Scuba (actually Camp Dresser Industries) would not take it back even to see why it failed. I will never buy a Genesis or Sherwood scuba product as a result. I got nowhere with Genesis because I purchased the computer overseas (happens to be where I have lived for the past 15 years). Once again I repeat, do not use these computers for deco diving.

2 old Dacor nitrox computers (green and round) made in Sweden or someplace like that. (I cannot remember the name of the manufacturer Benetec? but they made dive computers for several companies.) 500 plus dives on these, one has failed, the other is used regularly as a backup. Hopefully, if they are still making computers, they have upgraded their algorithm. This is a fairly liberal computer in the default mode. I prefer something with a more modern algorithm.

I am currently in the market for a couple of new computers. I am leaning toward the Diverite Duo / Tusa / Seiko / Cressi Sub computer. Easy to read and a good interface with the buttons. I think they now have the bugs out of the current version. Scan the boards from a year ago and you will find multiple failures for this computer.

I may instead go for a couple of new MR2s from Mares. Of course I plan to buy them from Scubatoys!

Peace, redkev

pyre24
05-14-2008, 02:13
ive been thinking of getting the Oceanic "Veo 100" Wrist Dive Computer. It is on sale and looks easy to use. I guess Ill find out. Downloaded the manual to read first.

huvrr
05-17-2008, 23:33
I still like suuntos wrist mounts

DIdiver
05-18-2008, 07:10
Get one that is nitrox capable. Most are these days, but it is a lot cheaper to spend a little more now then have to buy a new computer WHEN you do go nitrox.