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finflippers
08-31-2007, 22:07
Me and my buddy were discussing weather or not nitrogen would build up in the blood stream quicker if you breath more.

So here it is. On this dive we figured that my buddy breathed close to 28 cubic feet more air then me. He has made the comment to me in the past that he breaths about two to three times to my one breath. Because he breaths a little quicker is he just blowing off the extra nitrogen or absorbing the extra nitrogen into the blood stream?

Suther2136
08-31-2007, 22:10
I think it's just time. 'Cause every breath out gets rid of some just like in takes it in to you. It's an equilibrium process, breathing slower could be argued to make it go faster by giving the N2 more time to absorb.

finflippers
08-31-2007, 22:31
I would not of ever thought that I would be at greater risk of nitrogen buildup because of breathing slower.

Divegirl
08-31-2007, 23:11
Can you explaint the major difference between nitro and air??? Benefits

finflippers
08-31-2007, 23:23
Air is basically 21% Oxygen and 79% Nitrogen

cummings66
09-01-2007, 09:04
I believe that if you breathe faster and deeper you take in more nitrogen. You can narc yourself pretty easy if you go down deep and start breathing fast, take it slow and you won't be as narc'd, at least that's how it works for me.

ianr33
09-01-2007, 09:06
Me and my buddy were discussing weather or not nitrogen would build up in the blood stream quicker if you breath more.


No. The amount of N2 absorbed will be exactly the same for both of you.

Only a very small amount of nitrogen is actually absorbed during a dive.The great majority of it (99.999% ?? ) remains in your lungs until you breathe out. Therefore the pressure of nitrogen in the lungs wil remain constant (you still have air in our lungs after breathing out)

Constant pressure of nitrogen in your lungs,constant amount of nitrogen absorbed.

ianr33
09-01-2007, 09:10
I believe that if you breathe faster and deeper you take in more nitrogen. You can narc yourself pretty easy if you go down deep and start breathing fast, take it slow and you won't be as narc'd, at least that's how it works for me.

Thats probably because you are producing a lot more CO2 due to high exertion levels (or because you are breathing rapidly but shallowly and not eliminating the CO2 )

CO2 is much more narcotic than N2 and is generally bad news in diving.

The narcosis you mentioned IS NOT due to increased N2 absorbtion

Kingpatzer
09-01-2007, 09:24
Breathing too slow or too fast at depth are both associated with CO2 problems, not N2 problems.

quarrydiver
09-01-2007, 14:22
Can you explaint the major difference between nitro and air??? Benefits

Nitrox is usually a blend with less nitrogen to allow you more bottom time on a dive without decompression. Disadvantage of nitrox is that you have limits to your depth at which you can have seizures due to oxygen toxicity. So if you're at medium or shallow depths, nitrox will give you more time. If you're interested in more details, I'd recommend a nitrox class. They're not too expensive and they offer a little deeper knowledge of what you're breathing and how it will affect you.

scubasamurai
09-01-2007, 15:32
i was going to say breathing to fast, hyperventilating, or slow breathing hypoventalation will affect your co results. breath too fast and you will get dizzy and pass out beacause the body reads you have to much 02 and will actually shut down. the nitrogen for dcs comes out of your tissues when your at depths. the deeper you go the more nitrogen you have in your blood and the longer you have to "let" it get back into tissues

CrzyJay456
09-01-2007, 16:20
i was going to say breathing to fast, hyperventilating, or slow breathing hypoventalation will affect your co results. breath too fast and you will get dizzy and pass out beacause the body reads you have to much 02 and will actually shut down. the nitrogen for dcs comes out of your tissues when your at depths. the deeper you go the more nitrogen you have in your blood and the longer you have to "let" it get back into tissues

that sounds right. breathing fast will make you black-out (same as on land) and then it could be very bad, specially underwater.




just maintain slow steady breathing, and you will be fine.
you dont have to worry too much about that if you are doing rec. diving, and pay attention to the tables/computer etc. just be safe

scubasamurai
09-01-2007, 16:33
i hope it sounds right, that pain in the dive buddy of mind i been trying to get to hyperventilate so he can pass out and thani can write funny things on his face, but than again your right too he is under water, have to wait till i get to the surface haha

CrzyJay456
09-01-2007, 16:43
i hope it sounds right, that pain in the dive buddy of mind i been trying to get to hyperventilate so he can pass out and thani can write funny things on his face, but than again your right too he is under water, have to wait till i get to the surface haha

:smilie39:

Jamesmb
09-04-2007, 16:35
I doubt their is much difference affecting the nitrogen level in blood.

CompuDude
09-04-2007, 19:45
Me and my buddy were discussing weather or not nitrogen would build up in the blood stream quicker if you breath more.


No. The amount of N2 absorbed will be exactly the same for both of you.

Only a very small amount of nitrogen is actually absorbed during a dive.The great majority of it (99.999% ?? ) remains in your lungs until you breathe out. Therefore the pressure of nitrogen in the lungs wil remain constant (you still have air in our lungs after breathing out)

Constant pressure of nitrogen in your lungs,constant amount of nitrogen absorbed.
Bingo.

There are, of course, individual variations on nitrogen absorption rates, which is why tables, computers, and decompression theory in general is an inexact science.

But overall, how fast you're breathing is not going to affect your nitrogen levels, although rapid shallow breathing will definitely affect CO2 buildup.

wgt
09-27-2007, 11:53
Variations in respiration rate around normal levels would not be expected to contribute to significant variation in ongassing of nitrogen. The concentration gradient of nitrogen across the pulmonary lining is inherently limited by the concentration of nitrogen in the scuba bottle (79%). Thus, faster breathing cannot greatly facilitate the movement of nitrogen from the lung into the blood. As far as slow breathing goes, the respiration rate would have to be pathologically slow (for most of us) to diminish the movement of nitrogen into the blood.

When we think of respiration, we tend to think of two things. First, we think of making oxygen available for transport to the cells. Second, we think of a means of eliminating carbon dioxide from the body. However, a third vital element of respiration relates to the maintenance of blood pH within very narrow limits, with lowered blood pH increasing respiration rate and elevated pH slowing the respiration. We can of course gain voluntary control over this system for a short while, but the chemical detectors linked to the nervous system will ultimately have it their way. In addition, for those wishing to force the issue, slower respiration increases carbon dioxide levels, which leads to decreased pH. This causes blood vessels to dilate, possibly contributing to headaches.

The simple solution to the problems:

1. Breathe at your preferred rate (with experience likely to reduce anxiety and excessive expenditure of energy and thus reduce breathing rates).

2. Carefully watch depth, bottom time, and surface intervals.

3. Keep yourself well hydrated and rested.

4. On the longer term, keep fit.

diverdad
09-27-2007, 20:43
Variations in respiration rate around normal levels would not be expected to contribute to significant variation in ongassing of nitrogen. The concentration gradient of nitrogen across the pulmonary lining is inherently limited by the concentration of nitrogen in the scuba bottle (79%). Thus, faster breathing cannot greatly facilitate the movement of nitrogen from the lung into the blood. As far as slow breathing goes, the respiration rate would have to be pathologically slow (for most of us) to diminish the movement of nitrogen into the blood.

When we think of respiration, we tend to think of two things. First, we think of making oxygen available for transport to the cells. Second, we think of a means of eliminating carbon dioxide from the body. However, a third vital element of respiration relates to the maintenance of blood pH within very narrow limits, with lowered blood pH increasing respiration rate and elevated pH slowing the respiration. We can of course gain voluntary control over this system for a short while, but the chemical detectors linked to the nervous system will ultimately have it their way. In addition, for those wishing to force the issue, slower respiration increases carbon dioxide levels, which leads to decreased pH. This causes blood vessels to dilate, possibly contributing to headaches.

The simple solution to the problems:

1. Breathe at your preferred rate (with experience likely to reduce anxiety and excessive expenditure of energy and thus reduce breathing rates).

2. Carefully watch depth, bottom time, and surface intervals.

3. Keep yourself well hydrated and rested.

4. On the longer term, keep fit.

I think you hit the nail on the head.