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bap521
12-02-2009, 21:28
I dont know what an "average" dive is, but how many calories do you think you burn on an average dive for you

navyhmc
12-02-2009, 21:40
This was made by folks a lot smarter than me: How many calories do you burn during (http://www.fitday.com/webfit/exerciseinfopage.html)

For me, I burn about 525 calories per hour diving.

bap521
12-02-2009, 21:46
thanks. i dont really care about losing weight or anything, just wanted to know.

FishFood
12-02-2009, 21:59
Interesting - It calculated me at 479 calories/hour. Theoretically unless diving in current, one should consume more calories getting in and out of the water than actually diving. Unless you're going after a grouper your heart rate shouldn't be elevated...

DivingCRNA
12-03-2009, 06:36
Interesting - It calculated me at 479 calories/hour. Theoretically unless diving in current, one should consume more calories getting in and out of the water than actually diving. Unless you're going after a grouper your heart rate shouldn't be elevated...

Heart rate does not directly control calorie burn rate. Metabolic rate does. If you are cold, you will burn calories faster.

tfd86
12-03-2009, 07:10
Interesting - It calculated me at 479 calories/hour. Theoretically unless diving in current, one should consume more calories getting in and out of the water than actually diving. Unless you're going after a grouper your heart rate shouldn't be elevated...

Heart rate does not directly control calorie burn rate. Metabolic rate does. If you are cold, you will burn calories faster.


I guess Great Lakes Diving has one up on Carribean waters then? I'll have to put down the Corona Light and grab a Guiness!

FishFood
12-03-2009, 12:00
Interesting - It calculated me at 479 calories/hour. Theoretically unless diving in current, one should consume more calories getting in and out of the water than actually diving. Unless you're going after a grouper your heart rate shouldn't be elevated...

Heart rate does not directly control calorie burn rate. Metabolic rate does. If you are cold, you will burn calories faster.

But it is an indication of what you're body is up too. Core temp was not factored into the equation.

For a typical dive one should consume about the same amount of calories as taking a Sunday stroll through the park... Else wise you'll suck through your air can too quickly and make enemies out of your dive buddy :smiley36:

navyhmc
12-03-2009, 19:12
That is a good point fishfood. If you dive right after a meal, you will have higher oxygen intake requirements which menas SAC rates that suck! My usual dive meal plan is a big breakfastabout 3 hours before getting to the dive site, a few small snacks w/protein, and complex carbs followed by a big meal after we're done.

scubamarc
12-03-2009, 19:21
how does water pressure affect these numbers? Most of the time you do not feel the pressue, but when you breath it takes more effort, compared to the surface, to expand your chest to displace the water. This why a sunday walk park should be less of a metabolic task.

CompuDude
12-03-2009, 20:58
I guess Great Lakes Diving has one up on Carribean waters then? I'll have to put down the Corona Light and grab a Guiness!

109 calories in a 12 oz bottle of Corona Light Beer.

126 calories in 12 oz of Guinness Draught.

I'll stick with the Guinness anyway! The whopping 17 calories you save isn't worth the flavor you leave behind...

CompuDude
12-03-2009, 21:18
how does water pressure affect these numbers? Most of the time you do not feel the pressue, but when you breath it takes more effort, compared to the surface, to expand your chest to displace the water. This why a sunday walk park should be less of a metabolic task.

Water pressure is about the same at 5' as it is at 200', because the air you're breathing is pressurized to counteract that very effect.

What's different, however, is the density of the air you're breathing. At 33', the air is twice as dense, at 99' it's 4 times as dense, etc. Deeper, and you start to see why they mix in helium so the viscous stuff is more breathe-y than slosh-y. (among other reasons, of course)

So yes, the deeper you are, the more effort it takes to breathe the air. Just not because of the water pressure on your chest.

As for calories burned, the figure I most often see getting tossed around is 600/hour. Supposedly that goes up in colder water, however, and down in the warmest water. Temperature is a VERY big determiner, since, in all but the warmest water, even if you don't feel cold your body is working enormously hard to keep your body temp where it should be.

The Activity Calculator on this page lists two sorts of scuba diving, and gives figures for each: Calories Burned, BMI, BMR & RMR Calculator | CaloriesPerHour.com (http://www.caloriesperhour.com/index_burn.php)

I've seen the "Navy Seal" figure before, in military literature, so I tend to believe it... and therefore give a bit more credence to this calculator.

chinacat46
12-04-2009, 05:51
I think you burn more keeping warm then you do from the exercise. I go very slowly and probably burn more walking in park then I would from the exercise of diving. Then again puting on the gear and taking it off burns some.

scubastud
12-05-2009, 14:47
+1 Compudude!

For me the less calories ya burn the better while diving. Means you are streamlined, relaxed, kicking properly and all that stuff.

scubamarc
12-05-2009, 15:05
Water pressure is about the same at 5' as it is at 200', because the air you're breathing is pressurized to counteract that very effect.


I am not sure about that, gas from your tank is not being pushed down your throat, Your diaphragm is contracting, opening the lungs, which moves the water, then the decrease pressure in your lungs pulls the gas from the tank.

Pressurized gas is the pressure of the water after leaves the tank is equivalent to the pressure of the depth. The pressure in the tank leaves at 3000psi(or current psi left in tank), down pressure through the 1st, then released then it is equivalent to the depth pressure.

Of course, I am not a medical engineer.

CompuDude
12-05-2009, 16:00
Water pressure is about the same at 5' as it is at 200', because the air you're breathing is pressurized to counteract that very effect.


I am not sure about that, gas from your tank is not being pushed down your throat, Your diaphragm is contracting, opening the lungs, which moves the water, then the decrease pressure in your lungs pulls the gas from the tank.

Pressurized gas is the pressure of the water after leaves the tank is equivalent to the pressure of the depth. The pressure in the tank leaves at 3000psi(or current psi left in tank), down pressure through the 1st, then released then it is equivalent to the depth pressure.

Of course, I am not a medical engineer.


That's exactly my point. You do have to pull harder than at the surface, but once you're underwater, the water's effect is the same at 5' as it is at 100', since the gas is adjusted to the ambient pressure at each. You're at equilibrium at both depths.

navyhmc
12-05-2009, 22:49
The only increase in breathing effort at depth would be from the increased density of the gas at depth. At 100fsw, the gas is 4 times as dense as it is at sea level-given ambient pressure and humidity as a constant for the sake of brevity. So, yes the effort of breathing at depth is higher. But given the density of the gas at sea level, this increase is fairly insignificant. My disclaimer though: I'm not a physicist nor a respiratory tech so I'm not the expert in the field, merely a educated minion.

inventor
12-05-2009, 22:50
I guess Great Lakes Diving has one up on Carribean waters then? I'll have to put down the Corona Light and grab a Guiness!

109 calories in a 12 oz bottle of Corona Light Beer.

126 calories in 12 oz of Guinness Draught.

I'll stick with the Guinness anyway! The whopping 17 calories you save isn't worth the flavor you leave behind...

Agreed! Just don't drink it when it's 117 degrees out. Three of them, and you will hit the sidewalk as soon as you hit the sidewalk!

As for the calories, I thought I'd burn a lot, but this site says 469 an hour. Also very surprised to find recently that my SAC rate is average to within three decimal points. Must be a lot of out o' shape divers in that research pool!:smilie39: