PDA

View Full Version : Suunto SK-7 Region 2?



rmkrause
12-23-2009, 19:43
Anyone know where I can get a region 2 (Carribean, Central America) Suunto SK-7 compass? All I can find online and at shops are region 1.

Dive Rong
12-23-2009, 19:54
I use an SK-7 Region 1 in Honduras with no problems at all. How far south would you be going? - DRg

rmkrause
12-26-2009, 23:10
Perhaps Indonesia - I see most of my diving occuring in regions 2 and 3 rather than 1. I might just need to source one while on a trip.

Inka26
12-27-2009, 03:41
i bought my SK7 in Europe, live in south america, and had no problem with mine, as 2 others divers who own one.

CompuDude
12-30-2009, 18:13
Perhaps Indonesia - I see most of my diving occuring in regions 2 and 3 rather than 1. I might just need to source one while on a trip.

While I don't have any specific recommendations for you, I will note that I dove in Thailand and Bali with my U.S.-purchased SK7 (I assume it's region 1) and didn't have any problems at all.

thesmoothdome
01-02-2010, 10:13
I believe that the different regions are due to a slight difference in where magnetic north is located in relation to the area. If you are just using the compass for basic navigation, you don't really need to have it line up perfectly with magnetic north. It'll still get you from point A to point B and back without a problem.

CompuDude
01-03-2010, 23:29
I believe that the different regions are due to a slight difference in where magnetic north is located in relation to the area. If you are just using the compass for basic navigation, you don't really need to have it line up perfectly with magnetic north. It'll still get you from point A to point B and back without a problem.

No, magnetic north is magnetic north all over the world. (with the exception of the poles, of course, where things get wonky) There is a correction that can be applied for any given longitude's deviation to correct from magnetic north to true north, but that sort of correction is rarely done outside of precision bearings such as those used for surveying.

The different regions have to do with the tilt of the needle (or needle card, in the case of the SK7). The tilt can be severe enough that the needle contacts the housing and won't spin freely enough to point properly. The SK7 is so tolerant of tilt, however (that's a big part of what makes it a great scuba compass), that the minor correction isn't usually a problem.

From another board:

"Each magnetic region relates to how much the compass disc will dip downwards when pointing north. When a compass is assembled by the manufacturer, tiny weights are added to balance the disc to a neutral position. You can generally use a compass balanced for a different region with good accuracy, but you may have to tilt the whole compass up or down slightly to make the disc spin freely."

All that said, yes, as long as your compass spins freely, it'll be just fine for general navigation. If you're following some precision-supplied bearings, however, it might be worth asking if the bearings are corrected for true north (rare, in scuba applications) or magnetic north. But this latter point has nothing to do with which region the compass was made for.

thesmoothdome
01-04-2010, 07:50
I believe that the different regions are due to a slight difference in where magnetic north is located in relation to the area. If you are just using the compass for basic navigation, you don't really need to have it line up perfectly with magnetic north. It'll still get you from point A to point B and back without a problem.

No, magnetic north is magnetic north all over the world. (with the exception of the poles, of course, where things get wonky) There is a correction that can be applied for any given longitude's deviation to correct from magnetic north to true north, but that sort of correction is rarely done outside of precision bearings such as those used for surveying.

The different regions have to do with the tilt of the needle (or needle card, in the case of the SK7). The tilt can be severe enough that the needle contacts the housing and won't spin freely enough to point properly. The SK7 is so tolerant of tilt, however (that's a big part of what makes it a great scuba compass), that the minor correction isn't usually a problem.

From another board:

"Each magnetic region relates to how much the compass disc will dip downwards when pointing north. When a compass is assembled by the manufacturer, tiny weights are added to balance the disc to a neutral position. You can generally use a compass balanced for a different region with good accuracy, but you may have to tilt the whole compass up or down slightly to make the disc spin freely."

All that said, yes, as long as your compass spins freely, it'll be just fine for general navigation. If you're following some precision-supplied bearings, however, it might be worth asking if the bearings are corrected for true north (rare, in scuba applications) or magnetic north. But this latter point has nothing to do with which region the compass was made for.


Thanks for the clarification. I knew the word magnetic was in there somewhere :).

dkh6070
01-04-2010, 08:26
magnetic north is magnetic north all over the world. (with the exception of the poles, of course, where things get wonky) There is a correction that can be applied for any given longitude's deviation to correct from magnetic north to true north, but that sort of correction is rarely done outside of precision bearings such as those used for surveying.

The different regions have to do with the tilt of the needle (or needle card, in the case of the SK7). The tilt can be severe enough that the needle contacts the housing and won't spin freely enough to point properly. The SK7 is so tolerant of tilt, however (that's a big part of what makes it a great scuba compass), that the minor correction isn't usually a problem.

Good info to know. Is there a difference between northern and southern hemisphere?

ReefHound
01-04-2010, 09:16
Sounds like all that one needs do is simply "tilt" their wrist (or slate or console) so the needle is balanced and rotates freely. Isn't that what we do anyway? I cannot know if my compass is perfectly level in the water, I look at the needle and hold the compass so the needle is rotating evenly and smoothly.

CompuDude
01-04-2010, 19:08
Sounds like all that one needs do is simply "tilt" their wrist (or slate or console) so the needle is balanced and rotates freely. Isn't that what we do anyway? I cannot know if my compass is perfectly level in the water, I look at the needle and hold the compass so the needle is rotating evenly and smoothly.

Pretty much, but it makes it hard to follow a needle that's pointed more towards the ground than the direction you want to go.

Again, with the Suunto SK7 it doesn't seem to be a big deal, but I haven't had a chance to test mine at every longitude. Yet. :smiley2:

rmkrause
01-04-2010, 19:28
Again, with the Suunto SK7 it doesn't seem to be a big deal, but I haven't had a chance to test mine at every longitude. Yet. :smiley2:

What is the furthest south you've taken your presumably region 1 SK-7?

CompuDude
01-04-2010, 23:09
Again, with the Suunto SK7 it doesn't seem to be a big deal, but I haven't had a chance to test mine at every longitude. Yet. :smiley2:

What is the furthest south you've taken your presumably region 1 SK-7?

Bali is as far South as I've had mine, but I've spoke to others tho have been further down South America (and South Africa) who say they didn't have a problem with theirs.

Tough call. I'd try the region 1. Very easy to sell if it doesn't work out, meanwhile, at least you have a compass!