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Subaqua
09-03-2007, 08:44
Hi,
I often have a headache after diving. Usually If I do more than one dive/day or deeper dives. I also seems to be frequent to others persons. Anything I can do to prevent this?

Zenagirl
09-03-2007, 08:58
Headaches are often a result of CO2 retention. My husband is a photographer and used to hold his breath for a short time to get a shot. When he did this he always had a killer headache at the end of the dive. It can also happen if you're skip breathing or breathing too shallowly.

plot
09-03-2007, 09:23
i figured out my diving headaches came from the sunscreen/bug repellant crap i was using called "bull frog"...

stay hydrated and try to do less work in the water.

cgvmer
09-03-2007, 09:34
I found drinking a significant amount after a dive (1L or more) reduced or stopped my headaches all together.

fire diver
09-03-2007, 10:08
Yep, all good advice. Drink plenty of water before and after the dive. Make sure you are breathing OUT completely during the dive. Try not to overexert yourself while diving, remember this is supposed to be fun!

If you do all of the above, and are still have headaches, you might want to talk to a diving physician.

FD

mm_dm
09-03-2007, 10:47
Awhile back I was using a breath count during dives to extend my gas. I would come up with a headache from CO2 retention. I also didn't hydrate enough prior to and after the dive. Now, I work on my cardio-vascular conditioning during the week and my gas consumption is about the same now without the headaches. I also drink a lot of water all week long.

WV Diver
09-03-2007, 10:53
Shallow breathing and not expelling all of your breath and completely clearing all the dead air space of your scuba system are the biggest reasons I have found for big headaches.

gtjason2000
09-03-2007, 10:55
I found I often was getting headaches because I was clenching my jaw harder than necessary to keep the regulator in my mouth. After biting through a mouthpiece I learned to ease up a bit and have reduced the number of headaches.

Xspect
09-03-2007, 11:16
Please explain about clearing the dead space out of your system


Shallow breathing and not expelling all of your breath and completely clearing all the dead air space of your scuba system are the biggest reasons I have found for big headaches.

WV Diver
09-03-2007, 12:18
Dead air space, aka dead space, are all areas that play no direct role in gas exchange. These spaces include your sinuses, trachea, etc., compound this with dead space from your eqiupment such as your regulator or snorkel and the dead space you have to contend with is increased even more.

Any air not completely purged from the added dead spaces, breathing passages, contain higher than normal levels of carbon dioxide that are mixed with the fresh gas (air) you take in on your next breath. At depth your tidal volume, that air which you take in during each breath, is decreased up to about 20%.

You can see that this decrease in tidal volume accompanied by extended dead spaces can significantly increase the carbon dioxide build up in your system. The higher the levels of carbon dioxide the more frequently and or more deeply your body stimulates your need to breathe.

So if you take long deep breathes the extra tidal volume increases the amount of fresh gas you inhale and helps prevent headaches by decreasing the amount of carbon dioxide that is in the fresh air mix you breathe.

Long, full breathes are good mkay.

wxboy911
09-03-2007, 14:25
When I dive cold water(53 or so) I tend to get a headache after the dive...I also used to clench my jaws too tighly and that would hurt later on in the day as well. Hydrate and stay relaxed is how I try and dive...and avoid the thermocline if need be.

Zenagirl
09-03-2007, 15:28
Good point about clenching jaws. You can get a SeaCure mouthpiece that is custom moldable to your mouth that will help with that.

I find that I barely even have to hold onto my mouthpiece anymore since getting a SeaCure.

Subaqua
09-03-2007, 16:21
Reading your response, I think it may be a mix of several factors. Never thought of it, but maybe I clench my jaws to hard. And it's true, when i drink more water before a dive, it's better. Also, I might stop breathing for a second (non volontarily) before expiring as I do normally outside the water. When I'm relax or concentrate on taking pictures I might forget to breath. I'll have to try all your tricks on my next dive. I'll also ask a physician this week and let you know if it has some other advices.

Thanks you all

loudgonzo
09-03-2007, 16:51
Dead air space, aka dead space, are all areas that play no direct role in gas exchange. These spaces include your sinuses, trachea, etc., compound this with dead space from your eqiupment such as your regulator or snorkel and the dead space you have to contend with is increased even more.

Any air not completely purged from the added dead spaces, breathing passages, contain higher than normal levels of carbon dioxide that are mixed with the fresh gas (air) you take in on your next breath. At depth your tidal volume, that air which you take in during each breath, is decreased up to about 20%.

You can see that this decrease in tidal volume accompanied by extended dead spaces can significantly increase the carbon dioxide build up in your system. The higher the levels of carbon dioxide the more frequently and or more deeply your body stimulates your need to breathe.

So if you take long deep breathes the extra tidal volume increases the amount of fresh gas you inhale and helps prevent headaches by decreasing the amount of carbon dioxide that is in the fresh air mix you breathe.

Long, full breathes are good mkay.

Very well explained!:smiley20:

fire diver
09-03-2007, 17:31
Also, I might stop breathing for a second (non volontarily) before expiring as I do normally outside the water. When I'm relax or concentrate on taking pictures I might forget to breath.

This isn't going to hurt you. Just as long as you aren't holding your breath during ascent, or holding it for extended periods during every breathing cycle.

FD

chewyjr15
09-03-2007, 17:45
are you drinking enough water, i know when i get slight dehydration i can get headaches.

Aussie
09-03-2007, 19:04
Hi,
I often have a headache after diving. Usually If I do more than one dive/day or deeper dives. I also seems to be frequent to others persons. Anything I can do to prevent this?

When I was in Vanuatu diving the Coolidge, alot of people were getting headaches after diving. They were in a warm location and some diving to 60m.
The guides told them that they drink as much water as they can before and after the dive. No more headaches.

Aussie

scubafreak
09-03-2007, 20:38
As already mentioned, drink lots of water before a dive.

diverdad
09-03-2007, 22:06
i had a problem with head aches to but i found out it was due to mask squeeze.

Subaqua
09-05-2007, 18:34
I ask a physician specialized in scuba diving and he told me that it's probably related to sinus congestion. It might be the case as the last time it happened I had more problem equalizing. He said I could take something like tylenol sinus before diving. But, I'll still try all of your advices.

thanks

Charlotte Smith
09-05-2007, 18:45
I ask a physician specialized in scuba diving and he told me that it's probably related to sinus congestion. It might be the case as the last time it happened I had more problem equalizing. He said I could take something like tylenol sinus before diving. But, I'll still try all of your advices.

thanks
Be VERY careful with any type of sinus med you can take over the counter.....it will, on occassion, stop working while you are under water and you could experience a reverse block if you have problems with sinuses and I can tell you from experience that it is not fun! Since I started taking only RX strength meds I don't have that problem but I had a dm stay an extra five minutes down with me because of the reverse block...good thing we weren't out of air...this was 2 years ago and I still haven't forgotten...

cummings66
09-05-2007, 20:13
If a person uses things like pseudofed then the 24 hour variety is what you should be using to avoid reverse blocks.

I think the others have covered the hows and whys of headaches for the most part and I think they're right.

plot
09-05-2007, 22:10
i get the knock-off 24hour sudefed brand at walmart and take 4-5 tablets instead of 1 tablet.

quarkuud
09-06-2007, 07:52
i get the knock-off 24hour sudefed brand at walmart and take 4-5 tablets instead of 1 tablet.

Do be careful with that. Pseudoephedrine acts by constricting your blood vessels, which raises your blood pressure, which can cause headaches. I used to get headaches which were sudden onset, and when I had one of these headaches I couldn't function. These went away when I started taking meds that dilate your blood vessels, the opposite of OTC decongestants. I'm not sure whether 4-5x the recommended dosage of Sudafed could cause a headache that bad, but I would definitely not want to risk something like that at 100 ft!

(Obligatory not a doctor disclaimer here)

Subaqua
09-06-2007, 09:16
Thanks for the warning about reverse block. I know a few divers that use sudafed without problems, but I cannot take that medication because it's too strong and my heart does not appreciate it. I thought that Tylenol would be an option, but given your experience I think I won't take the chance. I guess I should just take more time during the descent to make sure everything equalizes just fine.

FyVe
09-09-2007, 21:05
thanks for posting this lol i was wondering also... it does seem to go away after some cups of water though.

tremtech
09-11-2007, 12:59
Good advice all

coralcrazed
09-13-2007, 14:57
Headaches are often a result of CO2 retention. My husband is a photographer and used to hold his breath for a short time to get a shot. When he did this he always had a killer headache at the end of the dive. It can also happen if you're skip breathing or breathing too shallowly.
are you kiddinghold his breath while diving.... rule number one in OW dive class. NEVER HOLD YOUR BREATH.

fire diver
09-13-2007, 22:48
Well, to be honest, that is a gross generalization told to new OW divers. It is told becase many instructors don't want to take the time to explain the finer points of bouyancy control.

So to explain this further... never hold your breath while you are ascending. It's perfectly fine to hold your breath for a few moments if you need to be really still. Never hold you breath as a routine of breathing.

Clear now?

FD

plot
09-16-2007, 20:15
yea, holding your breath isn't a big deal. it's not that it's overblown, but it's alot easier to drill it into students head to "never hold your breath" so they don't get lung expansion injuries or something while ascending.

which brings us up to the real point. never hold your breath while ascending ;)

loudgonzo
09-17-2007, 10:16
Question on exhaling completely...
Do you exhale completely and then some? Meaning breathing out every last spec of air until you dry out your lungs....or just breath out as much as you can comfortably.
I find that if I squeeze every bit of air out of my lungs, on the inhale I have a tendency to want to suck up air fast.

BobArnold8265
09-17-2007, 10:41
Another cause of headaches can also be sinus squeeze. Take a decongestant if you feel the least be congested prior to diving.

greyzen
09-17-2007, 11:37
if you are getting headaches that go away once you've drank some water, sounds like you are becoming dehydrated... drink some water/juice before/during the dive, see if that helps.

Vercingetorix
09-17-2007, 12:41
if you are getting headaches that go away once you've drank some water, sounds like you are becoming dehydrated... drink some water/juice before/during the dive, see if that helps.This cured my head-aches. I used to get a head-ache after two or three dives in a day. Then, somebody reminded me of my OW training - dehydration. Started drinking heavily (water,not booze...) and poof...no more headaches.

Subaqua
09-17-2007, 14:04
I followed your advices. I drank water just before my dives and I took some juices on the boat to drink right after my dive, and I was fine. That must be because of the dehydration.

greyzen
09-17-2007, 17:49
It's hard being this awesome...it really is :)

I'm going to be sending a PM to larry, try to get him to Market a new drink

"Scuba Juice!"

Contains: Water, Salt, Amphe...er Nutrients

jo8243
09-18-2007, 09:43
Good point about clenching jaws. You can get a SeaCure mouthpiece that is custom moldable to your mouth that will help with that.

I find that I barely even have to hold onto my mouthpiece anymore since getting a SeaCure.

+1 for the seacure. I love mine. I used to get jaw fatigue all the time but since I put on the seacure, no more.

greyzen
09-18-2007, 10:04
I've thought about getting one of those, the concept seems solid and I've heard no complaints..

Perhaps I'll add it on my 'major' purchase

DZorn00
09-18-2007, 10:34
Good point about clenching jaws. You can get a SeaCure mouthpiece that is custom moldable to your mouth that will help with that.

I find that I barely even have to hold onto my mouthpiece anymore since getting a SeaCure.

Does ST carry these mouth pieces? I have jaw fatigue big time. I need a lot more practice but I have asked my LDS and they just have the back up mouth pieces.

plot
09-18-2007, 17:50
Question on exhaling completely...
Do you exhale completely and then some? Meaning breathing out every last spec of air until you dry out your lungs....or just breath out as much as you can comfortably.
I find that if I squeeze every bit of air out of my lungs, on the inhale I have a tendency to want to suck up air fast.

comfortably. just take nice deep breaths fully inhaling and exhaling and it'll get clear your lungs out... don't gotta go overboard and blow a gasket or something.

greyzen
09-18-2007, 17:53
Does ST carry these mouth pieces? I have jaw fatigue big time. I need a lot more practice but I have asked my LDS and they just have the back up mouth pieces.

http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=SCI

coralcrazed
09-19-2007, 12:10
Another cause of headaches can also be sinus squeeze. Take a decongestant if you feel the least be congested prior to diving.

that is rule number two... don't take decongestants as it wears off and you could be dealing with a reverse block. not a good idea in my opinion. if you are congested do something else other than diving...

I also re-read the info... and they really did not say HOLD your breath they said pause and be sure thatthe airway stays open so you can not get lung overexpansion. However, I think if you do this on every breath you can risk co2 retension. I say just breath normally... well, slow deep breaths.

greyzen
09-19-2007, 12:15
That is mainly as people take decongestants when they wake up, and 4 hours later they go diving...
if you take a 12hr or a 24hr time released, an hour before you go out... you should be fine *maybe* :D

DZorn00
09-19-2007, 12:28
Does ST carry these mouth pieces? I have jaw fatigue big time. I need a lot more practice but I have asked my LDS and they just have the back up mouth pieces.

http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=SCI
Thank you,
I should have just looked myself, I was to caught up in this forum, man it is addicting..

jimmysdevoted
09-30-2007, 23:31
My Husband and Duaghter both havesevere allergies. They swear by Alavert D. Jimmy gets post diving headaches from his sinuses and when he takes the alavert he doesnt have them.
Margo just has allergies.
I get post snorkeling headaches when I do deep pike dives or follwo teh bottom and come up through 30 foot water too many times.

I found for me, Excedrin Migraine works for prevention. I take it, take a nap before going in and i prevents a headache.

Anne Eastwell
10-01-2007, 19:53
A very enlightening thread :smiley20: Thanks everyone for all the info. I don't suffer from headaches post diving but am keen to learn a bit more about the physical changes underwater.

texarkandy
10-02-2007, 00:03
Dead air space, aka dead space, are all areas that play no direct role in gas exchange. These spaces include your sinuses, trachea, etc., compound this with dead space from your eqiupment such as your regulator or snorkel and the dead space you have to contend with is increased even more.

Any air not completely purged from the added dead spaces, breathing passages, contain higher than normal levels of carbon dioxide that are mixed with the fresh gas (air) you take in on your next breath. At depth your tidal volume, that air which you take in during each breath, is decreased up to about 20%.

You can see that this decrease in tidal volume accompanied by extended dead spaces can significantly increase the carbon dioxide build up in your system. The higher the levels of carbon dioxide the more frequently and or more deeply your body stimulates your need to breathe.

So if you take long deep breathes the extra tidal volume increases the amount of fresh gas you inhale and helps prevent headaches by decreasing the amount of carbon dioxide that is in the fresh air mix you breathe.

Long, full breathes are good mkay.

Just curious - might this concept also apply to lungs (alveoli) damaged by smoking thereby increasing C02 retention and resulting in headache while/after diving?

PhantomCat
10-02-2007, 07:32
Dead air space, aka dead space, are all areas that play no direct role in gas exchange. These spaces include your sinuses, trachea, etc., compound this with dead space from your eqiupment such as your regulator or snorkel and the dead space you have to contend with is increased even more.

Any air not completely purged from the added dead spaces, breathing passages, contain higher than normal levels of carbon dioxide that are mixed with the fresh gas (air) you take in on your next breath. At depth your tidal volume, that air which you take in during each breath, is decreased up to about 20%.

You can see that this decrease in tidal volume accompanied by extended dead spaces can significantly increase the carbon dioxide build up in your system. The higher the levels of carbon dioxide the more frequently and or more deeply your body stimulates your need to breathe.

So if you take long deep breathes the extra tidal volume increases the amount of fresh gas you inhale and helps prevent headaches by decreasing the amount of carbon dioxide that is in the fresh air mix you breathe.

Long, full breathes are good mkay.

Just curious - might this concept also apply to lungs (alveoli) damaged by smoking thereby increasing C02 retention and resulting in headache while/after diving?

Yes the concept applies, but it is kind of independant of smoking. You don't expell all the CO2 out of your lungs when you breath normal on the surface. So yes there is a SMALL amount of dead space. Now smoking does effect your lungs ability to efficiently exchange gas, but it has more to due with the CO (carbon Monoxid). CO actually bond to red blood cells so strong the it requires a drastic increase in partial pressure of O2, to break the bond. This is why people who have CO poisoning get put in a chamber.

highdesert
10-02-2007, 21:31
Seems the responses have covered just about every possible cause of headache, but I might as well add one I saw on a dive trip this June. The lady simply had her mask way too tight! Not to say that's your issue, but if you're surfacing with "ring around the face", give it some consideration.

datamunk
10-05-2007, 21:18
dive nitrox! higher levels of oxygennnn

redneckdiver52
10-23-2007, 12:22
Make sure your mask fits properly. You shouldn't have to jerk the straps down to get it to seal properly. Also, make sure you are exhaling a little air into your mask to prevent mask squeeze.

I realize these are the most obvious reasons, but sometimes it is the simplest stuff that gets overlooked causing the problem.

gibson1525
10-25-2007, 11:21
I've also had headaches ever since I started diving. Hydration helps but is no cure. I take 800mg of Ibuprofen in the morning and i don't feel a thing all day. It doesn't treat the cause but I got tired of experimenting and still coming up with headaches every day.

mm2002
11-12-2007, 17:08
.. don't gotta go overboard and blow a gasket or something.

Are lung gaskets replaceable? :smiley36:

medicdiver
11-16-2007, 02:58
When I had my regulators service, the tech asked if I was getting headaches on the dives. I did once in a while and he told me that the regulator was not adjusted properly making it harder to breath. He had me try it before he adjusted it and then afterwords and man, was there a difference. You might consider taking your regulator to a shop to check the adjustments if nothing else has helped.

Grin
11-29-2007, 10:27
This thread is actually kind of funny. All of it is true, but do you think we have made big enough list of things that could be causing it.
I used to get headaches occassionally. I also used to do alot of things wrong in diving. I didn't do it on purpose, I am just a slow learner.
In the last few years I have done all of the follwing to make my diving experience better and I cannot gaurantee anything works better than the other.
Here it goes:
1. I now accend super slow, like 10 FPM
2. I jog every morning.
3. I don't drink alcohol the day before diving (maybe 1-2 beers max).
4. I drink alot of water the morning of diving and also drink water after getting back in the boat.
5. I don't take any drugs except Dramamines when it's really rough. My opinion is sinus meds are good for nothing related to diving. Everyone has their own opinion on that one. I have regular aspirin on board but I never need them. If I did have a headache I'd take one.
6. I had my thick(5mm)wetsuit custom made so it doesn't squeeze me(cirulation is important), but it keeps me as warm as possible. Custom is not that important on 3mm and smaller suits as they stretch plenty easy. My previous 5mm suit was very tight, I sold it.
7. Mindset and control of my dives for no overexertion. Slow kicks, control heart rate, no following other divers that are overexcited or in better shape than me. Stay calm and decide your own pace.
8. I replaced my regulator with the easiest breathing reg I could research up. I came up with the Zeagle Flathead XP. I garantee this is a huge factor and very noticable and a welcome difference.
9. Decend semi slow and clear often. No following the guys who race to the bottom! I sink down, no swimming down for me anymore.
10. Streamline your rig. I sold my Zeagle Ranger and bought a backplate and wing. Much less drag is the result. This(along with the jogging) allowed me to switch to super efficient long fins(Cressi 2000s).

I'm sure I forgot other items, but that is a good list.

Add it all up and my diving style of today is completely different than a few years ago. I can 100% honestly say I think every one of those items helps me to enjoy my diving passion to a higher degree. I feel great after a days diving and I cannot remember getting headache in well over a year from diving. I think the extra slow accent is a easy item that makes a big difference. Remember to accend that last 20 ft, after your safety stop, real slow also. No popping up as if your done(your not!) after the safety stop!

ianr33
11-29-2007, 11:22
Any air not completely purged from the added dead spaces, breathing passages, contain higher than normal levels of carbon dioxide that are mixed with the fresh gas (air) you take in on your next breath. At depth your tidal volume, that air which you take in during each breath, is decreased up to about 20%.

Long, full breathes are good mkay.

Excellent explanation. I would just add that at 100 feet the air we are breathing is 4 times as dense as it is on the surface.That makes it harder to move in and out of our lungs,so the deeper we dive,the more important it is to take long,slow,deep,breathes.

We did not evolve to breathe air at 4ATM, so our breathing pattern needs to be different when diving deep.

WV Diver
11-29-2007, 17:00
Any air not completely purged from the added dead spaces, breathing passages, contain higher than normal levels of carbon dioxide that are mixed with the fresh gas (air) you take in on your next breath. At depth your tidal volume, that air which you take in during each breath, is decreased up to about 20%.

Long, full breathes are good mkay.

Excellent explanation. I would just add that at 100 feet the air we are breathing is 4 times as dense as it is on the surface.That makes it harder to move in and out of our lungs,so the deeper we dive,the more important it is to take long,slow,deep,breathes.

We did not eveolve to breathe air at 4ATM, so our breathing pattern needs to be different when diving deep.

Thanks and remember too that the more you exert yourself at depth the faster and shallower your breathing becomes thus adding to an already escalating problem. This is why it is important for divers to have good cardiovascular conditioning.

spellow
12-03-2007, 13:18
I used to get headaches in the beginning but once I slowed down my breathing to deep long breaths they stopped all together.

loudgonzo
12-03-2007, 14:39
Something I need to work on, but won't long, slow, deep breaths make you go up and down? Or is it not as bad as it sounds? I have not paid much attention to this while diving.

TRACI
12-03-2007, 15:00
It has help me to loosen my mask up, when I first started diving I had it way too tight.

cutter77
01-12-2008, 00:48
...I used to get migraines after diving. (Nothing worse than being on a "rustic" liveaboard in the middle of the Carib with only two Imitrex tablets.)

Now I pay special attention to what/when I eat, and avoid caffeine and chocolate (moan). Also do a few stretches before diving to get loose and hold down the stress. Pretty well took care of the problem.

claiborne022
01-29-2008, 13:37
Drink water

jeepbrew
01-29-2008, 18:15
Wow, great thread. I get headaches after doing about 3 or 4 dives a day. Now I have some ideas to prevent them!

DeeDoubleYou
02-11-2008, 05:55
Maybe this was mentioned already, but the fact that scuba tank air is extremely dry causes major dehydration of the lungs, throat, mouth, etc. I was told that using an Apollo Bio-filter to re-hydrate the air can keep all your air passageways moist, thus preventing headaches! I have not tried it yet, but I have a feeling that it's just around the corner for me.

Suther2136
02-11-2008, 18:08
Good thread, I learned something ...2 more

pyre24
02-15-2008, 01:49
I found I often was getting headaches because I was clenching my jaw harder than necessary to keep the regulator in my mouth. After biting through a mouthpiece I learned to ease up a bit and have reduced the number of headaches.
Ive done that also. my jaw would ache afterwards also.

Chocoholic
02-23-2008, 17:08
first time I saw a big shark I bit through the reg mouthpiece. I used to really bite on it but now I just kinda hold it, that helped with the jaw fatigue.

HolgMaster
03-31-2008, 13:53
i wouldnt take any blood thinning pills or anything whilst diving or going diving. You never know what the side effects are...

go to the doc and see what he says. Maybe the O2 build up or something that your body cannot release....

chris in the socal
03-31-2008, 18:50
For me they happen on the 3rd dive. I always trough up or burp alot and then it goes away. Then I feel better.

aggie99
03-31-2008, 19:01
I have had cronic migraines all my life but I don't seem to get them after diving which is wierd. Maybe it is just because it is the only time I am consiously thinking of keeping hydrated, or maybe it's God's way of tellng me to dive more :) Good advice though in case that changes!

cummings66
03-31-2008, 19:10
From what I can tell, and like I said near the start we've covered most bases, I'd forgot about the regs causing it, but a poorly adjusted reg that makes you work to breathe will cause CO2 retention and you'll get a headache from that. I suppose you could say any gear that makes you work harder might cause that same problem.

In the end, what they said in OW seems to apply. Breathe deeply enough to exchange all the gases in your lungs, do not breathe shallow.

I've seen a lot of postings that are false here though, the proper pseudofed will not wear off during a dive, there's no reason to worry about reverse block if you use it if you choose the longer lasting version. Whether it will cause problems or not seems to mystify even the experts. They say it might, but then again, it might not.

In the end, breathe right and hydrate correctly. That is not something you can do the day of, if you think you can you're dead wrong. It is something you need to start doing days before you dive. That may be why some of you still have problems even though you think you're hydrating, in reality you're only partially doing it.

Drink enough that you pee like a person should, that means if you only go once or twice a day you're really dehydrated. You need to pee every few hours if you're properly hydrated. Do that and I'll bet the few holdouts notice even more improvement. If not, see an ENT.

DiverBry
03-31-2008, 23:30
Cold water without a hood can do it too... ever had an ice cream headache?

NoTime58
04-01-2008, 07:52
I found I often was getting headaches because I was clenching my jaw harder than necessary to keep the regulator in my mouth. After biting through a mouthpiece I learned to ease up a bit and have reduced the number of headaches.
Ive done that also. my jaw would ache afterwards also.


I've had the same problem too. Started making a conscience effort not to "bite" down with enough force to take off a finger, drank more water before and after each dive and I use NITROX on most of my dives now which seemed to help with the dehydration effects of a dive.

NoTime58
04-01-2008, 08:05
From what I can tell, and like I said near the start we've covered most bases, I'd forgot about the regs causing it, but a poorly adjusted reg that makes you work to breathe will cause CO2 retention and you'll get a headache from that. I suppose you could say any gear that makes you work harder might cause that same problem.

In the end, what they said in OW seems to apply. Breathe deeply enough to exchange all the gases in your lungs, do not breathe shallow.


I've seen a lot of postings that are false here though, the proper pseudofed will not wear off during a dive, there's no reason to worry about reverse block if you use it if you choose the longer lasting version. Whether it will cause problems or not seems to mystify even the experts. They say it might, but then again, it might not.

In the end, breathe right and hydrate correctly. That is not something you can do the day of, if you think you can you're dead wrong. It is something you need to start doing days before you dive. That may be why some of you still have problems even though you think you're hydrating, in reality you're only partially doing it.

Drink enough that you pee like a person should, that means if you only go once or twice a day you're really dehydrated. You need to pee every few hours if you're properly hydrated. Do that and I'll bet the few holdouts notice even more improvement. If not, see an ENT.


I used to drink so much water and gatorade when I worked in Iraq that it seemed like I was "P" ing every hour on the hour (LOL) !!! The heat over there will dehydrate you in a "heartbeat". That's something you never wanted to happen over there was getting dehydrated......if they had to "stick" you once with an IV to get rehydrated you got a formal written counseling statement, the second time they put you on a plane and sent you back home (civilian contractor.....not Military). I never figured diving could bring on dehydration, until I started diving. You're right, you can't hydrate yourself in an hour or two...it's something you have to do continuously.

cummings66
04-01-2008, 13:19
That's the point I'm trying to reinforce in people, you don't just start drinking before you get on the boat and during the SI's, that's not going to do anything other than make you piss. You've got to start at it much earlier than that.

Studies have shown that many people in daily life are dehydrated somewhat, most just don't drink enough. I saw one guy post that he was hydrated and it was normal for him to pee once a day. He just didn't get it.