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Rascal1933
09-03-2007, 10:32
OK Gang... Here's a new Post where you can add some diving knowlege/wisdom that you may have.
Time to post-up and share with the members here in the ScubaToys Community. :smiley2:



Always dive within your training and limits!

chewyjr15
09-03-2007, 12:47
never ever hold your breath

Hollywood703
09-03-2007, 12:53
you take a class and think you know everything. then you learn in real world experience that you dont know #%^#! Im learning new stuff every day even after 12 years.

Ramgib
09-03-2007, 13:07
That I need a second job to pay for all the gear and trips.

Actually, have a great dependable buddy but always be self-sufficient.

Capt Hook
09-03-2007, 13:25
That's it's harder than it looks.
At first.

in_cavediver
09-03-2007, 14:25
There is always someone who is a better diver, strive to be that better diver.

Diving is not a competition, its recreation

Its OK to call a dive for any reason, period.

There is always something new to see or to learn, never stop looking or learning.

Stay within you own limits, always. It will be there later when you are ready to see it on your terms.

Kingpatzer
09-03-2007, 14:59
"Divemaster" certification means you might have learned enough to start learning how to dive.

JCAT
09-03-2007, 18:26
Really listen to what your body tells you.

If someone says they've never been narc'ed, then they are not listening to their body and you sholdn't dive with them.

Not meant to be harsh, but thats how I look at it.

No Misses
09-03-2007, 19:49
What have I learned? If you only bring a tropical shorty, you will hit the coldest thermocline of your life. If you bring the 3m farmer john the water will be 80 deg all the way down. If you leave your speargun on the boat, you will have 40lb black groupers swimming right up to check you out.

LCF
09-03-2007, 20:11
Here are a couple of my personal beliefs:

Really skillful diving begins with the ability to be still. If you can't be still, then you're wasting energy just staying where you are. You want to use all the movements you make to get you where you want to go, because movement is gas used.

The buddy system should have more than lip service paid to it. Good buddy skills make a dive smoother, safer, and more fun.

Know the "why" of what you do. Learning more about diving, whether it's reading some decompression theory, or following some on-line arguments about gear configurations, can do nothing but make you wiser in your choices.

If you're diving in oceans, lakes, or rivers, learn about the things that live there. It will enrich your diving manyfold.

It's fun to dive with new divers -- They bring back the wonder in being underwater. And they need experienced buddies!

thesmoothdome
09-03-2007, 20:26
Diving should be fun....have fun.

A long surface swim is a time for reflection and relaxation. You're not racing to get there and back.

The only legal sized bug is always just out of reach.

Squid are horny little creatures.

Weight always weighs more than you want it to when you have to carry it.

The best dives can't be planned. You never know when memorable things will happen. Enjoy the experience.

The worst dives can't be planned. Have the skills and confidence to deal with what might happen, even if it never will.

Sea lions always know when you have a fish on a stringer.

If you're a bad shot with a spear gun, buy a camera.

If you're a good shot with a spear gun, buy a camera.

No one is forced to dive. We do it because we love it. Have fun!

lucidblue
09-03-2007, 20:28
That I quickly became addicted to it.... :icon_smile_big:.

Buoyancy is key.

Rascal1933
09-03-2007, 21:24
Wow
Thanks to all the members who have posted so far for sharing...
Outstanding! :smiley32:

Jaymeany
09-03-2007, 21:35
How little we really know about our world.

sidneydiver
09-03-2007, 23:04
I learned that there is no modesty in diving! I have no issues in helping and being helped with a crotch strap anymore.

I also learned that it is an addiction and a form of therapy for me.

DivingsInMyBlood
09-03-2007, 23:07
if you pee in the rented suit you take it home to clean.

creggur
09-04-2007, 07:03
That this forum is a great place to learn more..
I don't think many days have gone by that I haven't learned something usefull here. This thread is a perfect expample..

wxboy911
09-04-2007, 08:33
You don't need to buy everything you want-just what you need, make sure it fits well, and panic is your worst enemy.

subsur
09-04-2007, 14:27
my lessons:
(1) don't be judgmental about other people's diving skills;
(2) listen to your body, it never lies;
(3) never stop learning from those who are better;

texdiveguy
09-04-2007, 15:06
I have learned that a taste of that old famous Humble Pie now and then just not so bad.

scubasamurai
09-04-2007, 15:22
know your dive buddy's skill level and training and when they dove last!!!

greyzen
09-04-2007, 15:27
I have learned that a taste of that old famous Humble Pie now and then just not so bad.

Sorry, I just want to quote this one for truth.
I've noticed a lot of people who could use a serving or two

texdiveguy
09-04-2007, 15:36
I have learned that a taste of that old famous Humble Pie now and then just not so bad.

Sorry, I just want to quote this one for truth.
I've noticed a lot of people who could use a serving or two

I have a slice once in awhile....helps to set me on the right track again. Yummy

Vegas
09-04-2007, 17:13
(A) Like many others have said -- 'tis OK to call a dive for any reason, any time, even if it's just a "feeling".
**IT'S BETTER TO CALL A DIVE THAN *WISH* YOU HAD CALLED THE DIVE.**

(B) Put on Sunblock BEFORE you feel too seasick to find it in your bag, so it's ALREADY ON when you perch yourself on deck in the bright sunshine to stare out at the horizon and wait for the most recent dose of Dramamine to kick in. <OUCH!> ....and.....

(D) NEVER eat asparagus before diving in a wetsuit. ;)

Kingpatzer
09-04-2007, 20:24
another one:

Your instincts are nearly always wrong. Never follow them blindly, that will tend to kill you.

lucidblue
09-04-2007, 20:35
another one:

Your instincts are nearly always wrong. Never follow them blindly, that will tend to kill you.

Not sure about underwater, but above, my instincts are rarely wrong. In fact, they are generally so accurate it's kinda scary.

Zenagirl
09-05-2007, 07:50
Relax.

Always pay attention to your surroundings, especially your buddy.

Sometimes the best part of a dive is what you see while hovering at your safety stop.

Kingpatzer
09-05-2007, 08:44
another one:

Your instincts are nearly always wrong. Never follow them blindly, that will tend to kill you.

Not sure about underwater, but above, my instincts are rarely wrong. In fact, they are generally so accurate it's kinda scary.

I mean this in a sense that if something goes slightly askew under-water, the average person will want to instinctively surface, or hold their breath, etc. The natural reaction, such as turning around if you're snagged on something to see what it is that has a hold of you, is usually the wrong one.

Charlotte Smith
09-05-2007, 09:03
Don't panic if you drop down in a huge tree and you are suddenly engulfed in the slime off of the branches...just ease out of it and watch for the fish you just scared out of there...
Always plan ahead and be prepared for the unexpected...like when the speargun went through my hand.....
Water snakes look really BIG underwater but they usually won't stick around......
Even though you are at 20 feet and exiting to the shoreline...you can still go too fast.....
EVERY dive has something new to teach you and you should always share your experience with the other divers (Embarrassing or not) so when they have the same thing happen to them they know what to do or not do...

ScubaJenn81
09-05-2007, 14:44
A good dive buddy will be there when you need them and only make fun of you and your stupid mistake halfway home and not the whole way.
Seriously though, a good buddy makes all the difference, treat them like gold when you get one.

Charles R
09-05-2007, 14:49
the biggest thing I have learned is I haven't learned enough. This sport is all about continuous education either through professional training or practice and mentoring!

lucidblue
09-05-2007, 18:37
another one:

Your instincts are nearly always wrong. Never follow them blindly, that will tend to kill you.

Not sure about underwater, but above, my instincts are rarely wrong. In fact, they are generally so accurate it's kinda scary.

I mean this in a sense that if something goes slightly askew under-water, the average person will want to instinctively surface, or hold their breath, etc. The natural reaction, such as turning around if you're snagged on something to see what it is that has a hold of you, is usually the wrong one.

Agreed, those things aren't a good reaction.


A good dive buddy will be there when you need them and only make fun of you and your stupid mistake halfway home and not the whole way.
Seriously though, a good buddy makes all the difference, treat them like gold when you get one.

A good buddy is definitely the difference. I think I would have a hard time diving with someone that I didn't know and trust.

thesmoothdome
09-05-2007, 22:14
A good buddy is definitely the difference. I think I would have a hard time diving with someone that I didn't know and trust.


I'll dive with anyone...once, and most likely again as long as they're not dangerous. Skills can be learned and improved upon. If I enjoy diving with them, we'll develop that trust, but I'm always cognizant of the fact that I trust myself more.

wxboy911
09-06-2007, 07:29
I thought of something else since I posted-I learned that a good breakfast and some dramamine could make a world of difference on a boat dive in the ocean. I also learned that there are no waves on the bottom and getting geared up under water saved the day!

tedtim
09-06-2007, 10:02
The cost for having two divers in the family is more than double the cost of having one diver in the family.