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skdvr
01-21-2010, 19:12
I picked up a couple of "E" tanks the other day for $10 each. Two of them had valves on them that I had not seen before so I thought I would post a pic and see what kind of info I can get about them. I am really just wanting to know if I can get a regulator for them or not. I am only planning on keeping one tank and selling the other 3 to buddies that want one, but like I said I just want to make sure those valves are useable.

http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll34/pebalsamo/IMG_0386.jpg

http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll34/pebalsamo/IMG_0385.jpg

http://i284.photobucket.com/albums/ll34/pebalsamo/IMG_0384.jpg

Thanks for any help....

Phil

nrembis
01-21-2010, 19:34
Thats wierd, not the square type valve your used to seeing on a tank to attach a reg....LOL.....must be some type of proprietary design.....looks goofy!

skdvr
01-21-2010, 19:40
Yeah the other two have the "Normal" valve on them. When I first saw it I thougth that it was a valve/reg combo but that is not the case... That I know of anyway...

Phil

comet24
01-21-2010, 19:55
Wired never seen that one before. Looks like it's designed to be pushed into into the reg. and held in place. Some special setup for container or inside something.

Smashee
01-21-2010, 20:01
Looks like it might be from an aviation O2 system.

navyhmc
01-21-2010, 20:03
That looks like one of the single flow regulators. Used a spanner wrench to turn in on, IIRC it's a constant 6 lpm flow. The best bet is to check with a local medical supply business and get with them.

skdvr
01-21-2010, 20:14
Thanks Navy... I will check that out. 6lpm would not do me much good....

Phil

nrembis
01-21-2010, 20:31
Thanks Navy... I will check that out. 6lpm would not do me much good....

Phil


You might be surprised what 6lpm will do........I do remember awhile back something about anyone could get systems fixed at 6lpm...I think it had something to do with OSHA not allowing adjustable systems out in where any employee had access to run and give it to someone...but not sure

navyhmc
01-21-2010, 21:36
Thanks Navy... I will check that out. 6lpm would not do me much good....

Phil

When the PADI rescue course came out, the recommended delivery was 6lpm. With a simple O2 mask you reach about 80%-85% O2 concentrations respiratory rate dependant. That and you can also give O2 via nasal cannual (those annoying prongs that go in your nose) at 6lpm too. A cannula is preferred over a mask if you have a patient that has a lot of nausea and vomiting, especially if they're not fully conscious.which will reach about 35% O2. While not 100%, every little bit helps.

So a constant 6 lpm does a few things: gives acceptably high O2 concentrations, a longer delivery time-which may be preferred depending on the length of time from DCI to definitive medical care and gives you a delivery choice. All this while you don't have to worry about adjusting a liter flow.

Not a suitable substitute for a O2 delivery class...:smiley20:

mitsuguy
01-22-2010, 00:25
now, it's suggested 15 lpm for a non-rebreather mask, and up to 25 lpm... without a demand valve type mask, 25 lpm may be required for a good breathing patient... obviously a demand valve unit is the preferred for someone breathing that good... every O2 kit, IMO, should have a non-rebreather mask, a demand valve, and a proper pocket mask - the pocket mask can be used to provide rescue breaths with higher percentages of O2, and doubles as the mask to be used with the demand valve...

as Navy said - not to be substituted for learning everything included in an O2 provider class

skdvr
01-22-2010, 04:40
Just as a FYI I did take the O2 provider course and I learned what MitsuGuy pointed out. 15 lpm....

Thing is thought with that valve there is no where that I can see to put line to feed a mask. The only two ports in the valve are where the pressure valve is and where the burst disk is...

Thanks again everyone for the help....

Phil

mitsuguy
01-22-2010, 04:47
here ya go... just replace the valves...

Portable Oxygen Cylinders and Regulators (http://www.cramerdeckermedical.com/product.php?product_id=189)

emclean
01-22-2010, 07:38
it was a medical bottle, i would guess from either an anesthesia machene, or a infant transporter.

wheelman
01-22-2010, 08:48
I was fortunate enough to have a dr write me a prescription for 02. I just went though the process a couple of months ago. I think you'll want to change it out to a cga-870. That is by far the most common for that size bottle. Just a couple of things, the e bottle is a handy size but @ 15lpm drains pretty quickly. Just depends on time to help, but you have multiple. Also, you'll be hard pressed to find (my experience anyway when I was looking) a 870-bi-pin reg that delivers more than 15lpm without a fair amount of expense. If you find a nice setup for them please post.

WaScubaDude
01-22-2010, 21:06
Portable Oxygen Cylinders and Regulators (http://www.cramerdeckermedical.com/product.php?product_id=188)

http://www.cramerdeckermedical.com/uploads/product/188/full_image.jpg
I need to get a new regulator for my O2 tank (currently has a simple one barb constant feed.) This looks like the reg we used in rescue class with 1 barb and two DISS takeoffs. Does this look and sound like the norm to you all? It is only $45, and tanks are about $40, so why are DAN O2 kits so fricken expensive? I see them used for $500 to $650??

mitsuguy
01-22-2010, 21:22
Portable Oxygen Cylinders and Regulators (http://www.cramerdeckermedical.com/product.php?product_id=188)

http://www.cramerdeckermedical.com/uploads/product/188/full_image.jpg
I need to get a new regulator for my O2 tank (currently has a simple one barb constant feed.) This looks like the reg we used in rescue class with 1 barb and two DISS takeoffs. Does this look and sound like the norm to you all? It is only $45, and tanks are about $40, so why are DAN O2 kits so fricken expensive? I see them used for $500 to $650??

price out a pelican case to fit it all in... I once thought the same thing until I found out those larger cases run anywhere from $150 to $250, depending on which size you want...

so, the DAN stuff is still a little up there, but, a good portion of it is the dry box...

j1j2j38
01-22-2010, 21:38
250 for a box? what does it do?

WaScubaDude
01-22-2010, 21:45
250 for a box? what does it do?
After a bit of research, it evidently holds $175 worth of O2 equipment.:smiley36::smiley36::smiley36:

Lone Frogman
01-23-2010, 03:54
If you are looking to save money. I just bought all the items on Amazon.com. All new equipment, jumbo D tank, both masks, reg 0-25 lpm and a manual resuscitator. Paid under $175.00. All I'm lacking is a case. I do have a E tank, I plan on mounting under one of the seats in my boat. Watch for hyrdo dates, most the used tanks I found were out of date. As stated before take a O2 provider class.

Grin
01-23-2010, 07:00
I tryed all those small medical 02 bottles with strange valves. I got disgusted and sold it all, then painted one of my AL80s John Deer Green. Filled it to 2500lbs (the max the dive shop had) with 100% o2 from my dive shop. I then bought a Zeagle reg with the factory installed 100% o2 kit, which doubles as a backup reg set, or my 100% O2 emergency reg.
Since I already had the AL 80 it costs me much less for this settup than a DAN kit. It is much easeir to settup on the boat than a DAN kit also. And it can be used many times without needing to be filled or topped off. And if it needs to be used for a extended period, it has the capacity to last hours and hours. It could even be submerged to 20 ft for deco etc... if you choose.

j1j2j38
01-23-2010, 10:34
that sounds like a good idea. Any disadvantages besides size?

WaScubaDude
01-23-2010, 12:07
If you are looking to save money. I just bought all the items on Amazon.com. All new equipment, jumbo D tank, both masks, reg 0-25 lpm and a manual resuscitator. Paid under $175.00. All I'm lacking is a case. I do have a E tank, I plan on mounting under one of the seats in my boat. Watch for hyrdo dates, most the used tanks I found were out of date. As stated before take a O2 provider class.
Thanks for the info on your fine purchase. And Yes, I did already take O2 provider.

WaScubaDude
01-23-2010, 12:10
I tryed all those small medical 02 bottles with strange valves. I got disgusted and sold it all, then painted one of my AL80s John Deer Green. Filled it to 2500lbs (the max the dive shop had) with 100% o2 from my dive shop. I then bought a Zeagle reg with the factory installed 100% o2 kit, which doubles as a backup reg set, or my 100% O2 emergency reg.
Since I already had the AL 80 it costs me much less for this settup than a DAN kit. It is much easeir to settup on the boat than a DAN kit also. And it can be used many times without needing to be filled or topped off. And if it needs to be used for a extended period, it has the capacity to last hours and hours. It could even be submerged to 20 ft for deco etc... if you choose.

Thought of this as well, just would like to stick with a rig compact enough to leave behind the seat of the truck. How much did you pay to fill an 80 with 100%??

Lone Frogman
01-23-2010, 13:02
that sounds like a good idea. Any disadvantages besides size?

If the diver needs O2 their going to have to be conscious to get it from a regulator. No way to hook up the O2 to a manual resuscitator.

Lone Frogman
01-23-2010, 13:05
Portable Oxygen Cylinders and Regulators (http://www.cramerdeckermedical.com/product.php?product_id=188)

http://www.cramerdeckermedical.com/uploads/product/188/full_image.jpg
I need to get a new regulator for my O2 tank (currently has a simple one barb constant feed.) This looks like the reg we used in rescue class with 1 barb and two DISS takeoffs. Does this look and sound like the norm to you all? It is only $45, and tanks are about $40, so why are DAN O2 kits so fricken expensive? I see them used for $500 to $650??

I got hosed paid I $75.00 for jumbo D tank at Amazon.com. Where can I get for $40.00?

Grin
01-24-2010, 10:36
" How much did you pay to fill an 80 with 100%??[/quote]"

$7 The same as a Nitrox fill. Obviously this will vary by shop and if you know the people etc...

It is true that you will have to be concious to breath out of a reg. But reality is: If you are not concious due to DCS, your is serious trouble and probably not going to make it anyway. You have to weigh the options: My opinion is super easy access and use, is alot more important than the rare unconcious diver. Super easy access and use means you will probably actually use it someday to prevent becoming unconcious.
When the settup (such as a DAN kit) is a PIA to set up, most will pass on minor symptoms. Especially when the situation is a simple precautionary use, due to a headache, or compromised accent etc..., and also means you need a refill. Most will just ride it out. I like the idea of making it too easy so people will use it. Add the fact you look like you belong in a ambulance on a medical settup vs sitting next to a reg and tank means (once again) poeple will actually use it.

You will also learn in the class (I didn't take the class, but I read the booklet) that to get high percentage dosage of O2 DAN recomends their reg(expensive) anyway. The masks only deliver so much (I forget but alot less than 100%) percentage of 02. But the DAN kit can be used either way (mask or reg).

If I'm not mistaken it's law that dive boats (paid / charters) have O2 on them. So if your a cattle boat diver, or charter boat diver, you need not worry (still worth checking). Only if you dive on a buddies private boat, that does not have O2, should you contemplate buying a settup.

comet24
01-24-2010, 10:54
" How much did you pay to fill an 80 with 100%??



$7 The same as a Nitrox fill. Obviously this will vary by shop and if you know the people etc...




Wish I could find someone to fill my deco tanks for that. My 40cuft filled to 2200psi cost a little over twice that last time I filled it.

mitsuguy
01-24-2010, 13:46
$7 The same as a Nitrox fill. Obviously this will vary by shop and if you know the people etc...

It is true that you will have to be concious to breath out of a reg. But reality is: If you are not concious due to DCS, your is serious trouble and probably not going to make it anyway. You have to weigh the options: My opinion is super easy access and use, is alot more important than the rare unconcious diver. Super easy access and use means you will probably actually use it someday to prevent becoming unconcious.
When the settup (such as a DAN kit) is a PIA to set up, most will pass on minor symptoms. Especially when the situation is a simple precautionary use, due to a headache, or compromised accent etc..., and also means you need a refill. Most will just ride it out. I like the idea of making it too easy so people will use it. Add the fact you look like you belong in a ambulance on a medical settup vs sitting next to a reg and tank means (once again) poeple will actually use it.

You will also learn in the class (I didn't take the class, but I read the booklet) that to get high percentage dosage of O2 DAN recomends their reg(expensive) anyway. The masks only deliver so much (I forget but alot less than 100%) percentage of 02. But the DAN kit can be used either way (mask or reg).

If I'm not mistaken it's law that dive boats (paid / charters) have O2 on them. So if your a cattle boat diver, or charter boat diver, you need not worry (still worth checking). Only if you dive on a buddies private boat, that does not have O2, should you contemplate buying a settup.

it would be worthwhile to take the course... I think you are missing ALOT of info from the course...

a non-rebreather mask delivers better than 90% O2, in fact, close to 100%

the difference between someone living and dying may indeed be the way yours is setup, and here is why... if someone has DCI, such as a lung overexpansion injury, they may not be able to breathe hard enough to make the air flow from a demand valve regulator

also, medical kits, such as DAN's kit, are not hard to set up at all... you simply mount the regulator on the tank, turn the tank on, then you either have a hose to go to a non-rebreather mask or to a demand valve mask... I can literally do it in less than 20 seconds - hardly an inconvenience. However, there should never be a reason to take the time to set it up in an emergency... in our kits, everything is assembled and ready to go - nothing more than turning the bottle on and you are good to go...

you are on the right track, but missing some key points that an O2 provider course would fill in the blanks...

nrembis
01-24-2010, 15:31
I think you'd be hard pressed to get more than 90% O2 out of a nonrebreather mask cause of the safety port built into them...average is 80-90% with a 15L max flow anything over that would be wasted

and the demand valve...hmm...you sure your not getting that term mixed up with a FROPVD?

Grin
01-25-2010, 09:40
I've got the Dan student handbook right here:
"non-rebreathing mask, may approach 90% (65-75% is considered common)"

"DAN Demand inhalator valve (a regulator with a mask)= the injured diver will inhale 100% O2 with proper seal"

of course i don't know how mush a normal scuba reg delivers out of the water. but i bet it's closer to 100% than 65-75 %. And any regulator will save major O2 capacity over a freeflowing type, like most medical types deliver.

How about that! I didn't even take the class:smiley36:

Now "No Misses" is going to want his booklet back. He took the class. I borrowed his booklet a few years ago.

mitsuguy
01-25-2010, 09:55
I think you'd be hard pressed to get more than 90% O2 out of a nonrebreather mask cause of the safety port built into them...average is 80-90% with a 15L max flow anything over that would be wasted

and the demand valve...hmm...you sure your not getting that term mixed up with a FROPVD?

maybe... in the O2 provider world, we just call them non-resuscitator demand valves...

where bag masks suffer, (and DAN's demand valve & a scuba regulator, for that fact), is that when we exhale, there is some dead air space... you really can't get away from this unless you just truly waste O2 with the bag mask...

either way, you need to come up with a way (I'm sure it can be improvised to work well), to get some sort of continuous flow setup working... I've been thinking about something along these lines to put a couple AL80's worth of O2 permanently mounted on our Newton dive boat...