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View Full Version : What is the ideal bouyancy situation for free diving?



sfbluestar
02-01-2010, 09:47
Should I be neutral bouyant at water surface? Or should I be negative or positive bouyant by how many lbs? Thanks.

mrmccoy
02-01-2010, 10:07
I'm no expert but I would think neutral or maybe a touch positive at the surface. That is assuming your wearing a wetsuit. Just my $.02

Vlane
02-01-2010, 10:58
If I remember correctly, free divers weight themselves so they are neutrally buoyant at 20 feet. Most of the shallow water blackouts that occur in free diving occurs in 20 feet of water or less so being neutrally buoyant at 20 feet means you have a greater chance of floating to the surface if you blackout.

It's hard to say how much weight you will need as it varies from person to person, just as in scuba diving.

sfbluestar
02-01-2010, 11:06
If I remember correctly, free divers weight themselves so they are neutrally buoyant at 20 feet. Most of the shallow water blackouts that occur in free diving occurs in 20 feet of water or less so being neutrally buoyant at 20 feet means you have a greater chance of floating to the surface if you blackout.

It's hard to say how much weight you will need as it varies from person to person, just as in scuba diving.

I thought it's slightly positive at the surface too... I've been checking out free diving videos and folks seem to be able to have their head stick out of water and just stay there without upward pushing (sometimes with fish in the air too)...

Vlane
02-01-2010, 11:31
If I remember correctly, free divers weight themselves so they are neutrally buoyant at 20 feet. Most of the shallow water blackouts that occur in free diving occurs in 20 feet of water or less so being neutrally buoyant at 20 feet means you have a greater chance of floating to the surface if you blackout.

It's hard to say how much weight you will need as it varies from person to person, just as in scuba diving.

I thought it's slightly positive at the surface too... I've been checking out free diving videos and folks seem to be able to have their head stick out of water and just stay there without upward pushing (sometimes with fish in the air too)...
Going back and reading the article the free divers in this case were neutrally buoyant at 33 feet where as most blackouts occur in 15 feet of water or less. That being said, yes you will be positive at anything about 33 feet and negative anything under 33 feet. So yes at the surface you should float fairly easily. I'm not a free diver so that's about all the input I can give here.

josh7284
05-18-2010, 08:59
free divings crazy!!

cmburch
05-18-2010, 10:59
Some abalone divers weight themselves heavy for 20'. I think it is safer to be neutrally buoyant at about 30'. If I try to get an abalone at less than 12', it can be difficult. One can always bring 2 to 3 additional pounds on their Boogie Board if needed. Think about being neutral at 20' when there is a 40' drop-off near the shallower reef you may be diving.

I work 30 to 40'. It only takes a couple of easy kicks to get me headed for the surface even carrying 2 abalone.

If you are weighted for 20' it will be harder to surface especially with your catch.

sfbluestar
05-18-2010, 11:24
Some abalone divers weight themselves heavy for 20'. I think it is safer to be neutrally buoyant at about 30'. If I try to get an abalone at less than 12', it can be difficult. One can always bring 2 to 3 additional pounds on their Boogie Board if needed. Think about being neutral at 20' when there is a 40' drop-off near the shallower reef you may be diving.

I work 30 to 40'. It only takes a couple of easy kicks to get me headed for the surface even carrying 2 abalone.

If you are weighted for 20' it will be harder to surface especially with your catch.

Makes a lot of sense -- do some work going down, and come up with some help.

Bill A
05-27-2010, 16:30
I like to run neutral at maybe 25 give or take a bit , wintertime diving a 7mm full suit takes more weight than the 4/ 3 I like in the summertime. The weight you use will vary depending on your suit and body mass. Just my slant on it
Bill

cmburch
05-28-2010, 18:43
Our water temps are warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. We wear the same gear year round unless traveling to Southern California. Southern California freedivers tend to work deeper, are neutral at about 35'. Check SpearBoard and DeeperBlue California Section for better info and discussions.

Bill A
05-28-2010, 22:09
I actually lived in the Redondo Beach area which is So Cal prime on the water for several years and then bought my own boat for diving and ended up living on it for a couple of years. I dove quite often on the Palos Verdes bluffs so the 25 give or take a bit is where your referring to. That was how I unwound after a days work, untied it and left the harbor usually by myself. I either went south down the bluffs or out looking for flotsum. It was a really neat time for me, I was single after my second wife passed so it was a part of my bucket list so to speek.
Bill