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bigman241
02-28-2010, 19:08
I was just going to look for a fitness forum and ask about some bikes. I mean bicycles not motorcycles either. I have been thinking about gettin a stationary but I have trouble riding on one long enough at the gym and am thinking about getting a normal bike. I have been tossing it around since last year and keep telling my self 475 is just to much on a bike. Last time I had one I was 15 and bought it from walmart and they put the thing togather wrong and I went over the handle bars and smashed my head on the concrete. Maybe that is why I am so dad crazy lol. :smilie39: TOokt he thing back and I have been on one once since.
I am thinking if I buy a good mountain bike something made for hills and rocks it will hold me.
Here is my question what bike would you guys recommend for me. Something that will hold up and take rough train. I like the outdoors and there are some trails at a fish and wildlife park here locally. Mile or so ride out and if I run out there take one of about three trails it would be between 2 and 5 miles a ride depending on which trail I took.

I do not want to spend 1000s on a bike but do not want 100 walmart special that will break or get me hurt.

I know not a scuba question but it is a fitness question. :smiley20:

Thanks guys

Bigg_Budd
02-28-2010, 19:11
first - road or mountain, dude?

also, have you thought about hitting the pavement to loose some lbs? google couch to 5k. it will change your life.

also, i do P90X. it's friggin' awesome, and you will drop weight and put on lean muscle quick like a mad man. i haven't been this strong since i played ball...

inventor
02-28-2010, 19:25
Great suggestion Budd, been trying for a program like this on my own, but haven't stuck to it. Been eyeballin' PX90 for the last couple years also, wondering if it was any good, knowing I needed to be in shape for it.:smiley20:

BRsnow
02-28-2010, 19:43
You can ride a bike but hiking and watching your calorie intake will work just as well to start. You need to exercise and run a caloric deficit to lose weight...If being on a bike helps great, but a program that you follow is the best way to get in shape...BR

Smashee
02-28-2010, 19:48
Here is my question what bike would you guys recommend for me. Something that will hold up and take rough train.

Off-hand, I can't think of anything that'll take a 500lb load over rough ground without breaking. Even some of the downhill & freeride bikes which are about as tough as they come wouldn't cope with that. 8' drops & rocky descents are hard enough on bikes as it is.

For road or flat paths, yeah, it might be possible. Get a decent hardtail commuter or citybike with flat bars, beef up the wheels (ATB tandem ones or similar) and it should do you for a bit, if you're gentle with it. A straight road-bike might be a little too fragile, especially if you're a bit torque-y.

If money's not an issue, I can think of a couple of recumbent trikes that would fit and be a damn site easier on your joints, too. Not cheap mind, but you're not worried about dropping $$$ on new hobbies, so would be worth considering.

Rileybri
02-28-2010, 20:00
You may consider starting on something like this.
http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/03/86/75/40/0003867540020_500X500.jpg

You may find it will take you weight easier and you dont have to worry about balance just working up your heart rate.

Trike link (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Schwinn-Meridian-3-Wheeled-Adult-Trike-Dark-Cherry/12016722?sourceid=1500000000000003260420&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=12016722#ProductDetail)

bigman241
02-28-2010, 20:58
Mainly road and light trail stuff not hard rocky stuff. Properly road and some gravel. Balance should not be a issue it never has. I know a local pawn shop has a nice high end mountain bike for 399. The guy said it cost 700 new. Might go check it out tomorrow. I hike alot more so summer and fall for hunting just figured a bike would be alittle easier on my knee.

Smashee
02-28-2010, 21:34
I know a local pawn shop has a nice high end mountain bike for 399. The guy said it cost 700 new.

That's not a high-end mountain bike. $400 will get you a high-end wheel hub.

Edit: It might be a perfectly adequate bike, but high-end cycling gear is *expensive*. Look to pay $4k+ for a top-shelf model.

bigman241
02-28-2010, 21:54
Ya I did a search and found one that was 4700. About **** when I saw it

I know a local pawn shop has a nice high end mountain bike for 399. The guy said it cost 700 new.

That's not a high-end mountain bike. $400 will get you a high-end wheel hub.

Edit: It might be a perfectly adequate bike, but high-end cycling gear is *expensive*. Look to pay $4k+ for a top-shelf model.

Smashee
02-28-2010, 21:56
Ya I did a search and found one that was 4700.

I won't tell you how much I paid for one of mine, then. :smiley5:

Trunk_Monkey
02-28-2010, 21:59
Mainly road and light trail stuff not hard rocky stuff. Properly road and some gravel. Balance should not be a issue it never has. I know a local pawn shop has a nice high end mountain bike for 399. The guy said it cost 700 new. Might go check it out tomorrow. I hike alot more so summer and fall for hunting just figured a bike would be alittle easier on my knee.

I've been bicycling since 2005. I typically log 1000-2200 miles/year depending on how motivated I am. At 250-260lbs, I have to carefully select my gear, especially wheels (32 spoke minimum). I also stay away from aluminum frame road bikes. I'm currently riding an over-built all carbon frame, having snapped a nice Italian steel frame a few years back while hammering hard up a hill.

At your size, your choices are either a mountain bike (not a cheapy, but a good one with a sturdy frame) or a hybrid. If you will ride mostly on the road, look at Giant, Trek or Specialized hybrids. Their wheel size gives you the option of mounting different types of tires. Before getting a good road bike (the one I broke), I rode a Giant hybrid for about 1200 miles. I still have that bike, still going strong with over 1500 miles on it.

Take a look at Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/) under the Clydesdale section for some good advice for a bigger rider.

Before buying a used bike (like the pawn shop one), check to see what that particular model has actually sold for (reserve met) on eBay. Search completed listings. Used bikes sell for a whole lot less than new ones and most new ones get discounted a bit off of list price.

BRsnow
02-28-2010, 22:03
I am an avid mountain biker here in CO and my bike makes scuba seems super affordable:)

Trunk_Monkey
02-28-2010, 22:08
[quote=bigman241;370911]high-end cycling gear is *expensive*. Look to pay $4k+ for a top-shelf model.

Are we talking US dollars?

I put together my 60cm Orbea Opal (a high-end carbon bike made in Spain) with Ultegra 10 gruppo for about $2K. Of course, if I had bought it as a whole bike at retail it would've been $3500.

Mountain bikes (except for competition models) and hybrids are somewhat less expensive than road bikes. Road bikes are designed and built to be very light while retaining strength and durability. That costs big $$.

BigMan, you don't need high-end for fitness riding, just a quality bike that is sturdy enough to handle your mass.

Smashee
02-28-2010, 22:11
I am an avid mountain biker here in CO and my bike makes scuba seems super affordable:)

Recumbent tourer & sometime audax/brevet rider here.

Smashee
02-28-2010, 22:15
I put together my 60cm Orbea Opal (a high-end carbon bike made in Spain) with Ultegra 10 gruppo for about $2K. Of course, if I had bought it as a whole bike at retail it would've been $3500.


Nice. Good price on that, too.


BigMan, you don't need high-end for fitness riding, just a quality bike that is sturdy enough to handle your mass.


Yep. :smiley20:

Trunk_Monkey
02-28-2010, 22:44
I put together my 60cm Orbea Opal (a high-end carbon bike made in Spain) with Ultegra 10 gruppo for about $2K. Of course, if I had bought it as a whole bike at retail it would've been $3500.


Nice. Good price on that, too.


BigMan, you don't need high-end for fitness riding, just a quality bike that is sturdy enough to handle your mass.
Yep. :smiley20:



I'm not from Queensland, but I do have a Queensland Blue Heeler.:smiley2::smiley2::smiley2:

Rileybri
02-28-2010, 22:49
Velonews forum (http://forum.velonews.com/) is the place you want to go asking the questions you need to answers to.

Jack Hammer
03-01-2010, 05:06
Bigman - if you get a bike stay away from the Wallmart, Kmart etc bikes. They are made with cheap components and will not hold up under the load you would put on them. If you are serious about getting a bicycle I would highly recommend finding a talking with a legitimate bycicle expert. Bike shops can be like scuba shops, some are excellent with great advice and reasonable pricing while others will essentially tell you that you will die if you don't buy whatever brand they sell at a premium. Try to talk to someone who races bicycles, road or mountain, they usually are much more knowlegable and straight forward (talk to the racer, not the shop that sponsors them).

Unfortunately, IME, their are quite a few bicycle snobs online that can be quite vocal and generally talk out their a$$es (think SB on steroids). This seems especially prevalent among the road bike crowds. There are also quite a few knowelegable and helpful people who will give excelent information. Just be careful who you choose to listen to.

Trunk_Monkey
03-01-2010, 06:59
Bigman - if you get a bike stay away from the Wallmart, Kmart etc bikes. They are made with cheap components and will not hold up under the load you would put on them. If you are serious about getting a bicycle I would highly recommend finding a talking with a legitimate bycicle expert. Bike shops can be like scuba shops, some are excellent with great advice and reasonable pricing while others will essentially tell you that you will die if you don't buy whatever brand they sell at a premium. Try to talk to someone who races bicycles, road or mountain, they usually are much more knowlegable and straight forward (talk to the racer, not the shop that sponsors them).

Unfortunately, IME, their are quite a few bicycle snobs online that can be quite vocal and generally talk out their a$$es (think SB on steroids). This seems especially prevalent among the road bike crowds. There are also quite a few knowelegable and helpful people who will give excelent information. Just be careful who you choose to listen to.

+1 from a fellow clydesdale.

Doug B
03-01-2010, 10:57
Wow, 475 pounds.

Just like any hobby, you can spend as little or as much money as you want. Honestly, i'm sure a $125 walmart bike will hold you, as long as you're riding on a paved road, riding around your nieghborhood. They sell a nicer version of a schwinn there (at least at my local walmart). Keep the tires pumped up - to just a few pounds under max pressure.

If your're really interested, visit your local bike store, talk to them. You'll want a wheel with maximum spoke count, but I'm sure they will be able to accomodate you.

One of the three wheeled bikes would be very nice. they are a little more money than a two wheeled bike though. I used to have one of those at work and would regularly load it up with more than six hundred pounds of parts (and me) and ride it around our factory. Mine had pneumatic tires. One of the bikes had hard plastic tires (no air), and it was much better. As long as you're not stump-jumping, the wheels will hold the load.

I've been riding off and on for more than 20 years. I got back into riding pretty hard core last summer, trying to drop from 230 pounds down to about 200. I bought a new bike last year, mostly to motivate me, and it's worked so far. I've got a trainer setup I'm riding in teh winter months, and I get bored after about 30 minutes, even with a TV in front of me. Riding outside is FAR more exciting than riding indoors. As long as there is no ice/snow on the roads, and the temps are 40 degrees or better, I'm riding outside. One nice thing about riding inside - no head wind. One bad thing about riding inside - no head wind....to keep you cool. Gotta have a fan blowing on me, on high, and I'm still sweating like a pig after ten minutes.

I've got both a road bike (actually two road bikes) and a mountain bike. I use the mountain bike when riding with my kids and wife. When I'm by myself, it's road bike all the way.

Good luck.

cmburch
03-01-2010, 11:45
I can see increase spoke adjustments, increase in the number of flats, bottom bracket, crank, frame problems depending on your bicycle build.

As mentioned in prior posts check out

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?248-Clydesdales-Athenas-(200-lb-91-kg))

Join the forum. They can answer specifics related to your situation and there is some very useful information available.

Good luck and happy cycling to a better healthier life!

Trunk_Monkey
03-01-2010, 12:22
I can see increase spoke adjustments, increase in the number of flats, bottom bracket, crank, frame problems depending on your bicycle build.

As mentioned in prior posts check out

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php?248-Clydesdales-Athenas-%28200-lb-91-kg))

Join the forum. They can answer specifics related to your situation and there is some very useful information available.

Good luck and happy cycling to a better healthier life!

The more I think about it, the better off you'll probably be with a decent rigid mountain bike (Trek 820 series or maybe a Specialized Hardrock or Rockhopper). Not that good for distance riding, but that is a long way off for you anyway.

They come in various frame sizes and getting the right one for your body size is very, very important.

If you stick with it and lose some serious poundage (set yourself a goal and hold yourself to it), then you may want to look at something different.

bigman241
03-01-2010, 16:13
Thanks alot guys both for recommends and the website. I am going to find a local bike shop and talk to them. Figure I will keep it on the pavement for some time. What worries me the most is hitting a hole and the alum wheel collapsing under me. A helmet will be a must.

Nemrod
03-01-2010, 17:21
I have been a cyclist for most of my life, even competed but I am a roadie, a skinny tire cyclist.

A "high end" bike is not 379 dollars, it would be 3,799 dollars. But the good news is that you do not need a high end bike. I don't even recommend a mountain bike. You should research something called a "hybrid" meaning it is like a cross between a town bike and a mtb. These are the rage now, not cheap a--- mountain bikes from Wally World and the price range you need to be in to have a durable machine is around 1,500 dollars. A quality bike and wheel set is stronger than you think they are.

FX - Ride Longer. | Trek Bikes (http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/story/fx/)

At 475 pounds, dude, you need to lose some weight and yes there are wheel sets that can support you so get down to a pro bike shop--not Wall Mart--and get on with the show.

Whatever you do, do not buy a stupid dual suspension cheapo mtb from Wally World, that is not what you need.

One of my bikes, a 1984 Pinarello bought new by me for 1,200 dollars, full Campy and pantographed, I have put more miles on this bike than a lot of cars I have owned. Italian Columbus SP/SL steel, classic road racer. I still ride it 50 to 100 miles per week weather allowing.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b395/JRWJR/bikes/PA240131.jpg

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b395/JRWJR/bikes/PA240137.jpg

N

Trunk_Monkey
03-01-2010, 20:14
Good 'ol Italian steel bike there Nemrod.

I miss my Tommasini Carbo-Fire.:smiley_cryingHyster It's the one I snapped (right where the tubular steel chain stay meets the drop, drive side) hammering hard up a hill.

Big cyclists are hard on gear.

Smashee
03-01-2010, 20:40
Big cyclists are hard on gear.

+1 to that. After destroying various hubs & rims, I ended up with a 36h, custom-laced rear that so far, has been able to withstand just about everything.
Phil Wood hub, triple butted spokes, one of the old Mavic MA40 rims & a 3X/Crows-foot lace. If I get totalled by a B-double, I swear this will be the only thing left in one piece. :smilie39:

Trunk_Monkey
03-01-2010, 22:12
Big cyclists are hard on gear.

+1 to that. After destroying various hubs & rims, I ended up with a 36h, custom-laced rear that so far, has been able to withstand just about everything.
Phil Wood hub, triple butted spokes, one of the old Mavic MA40 rims & a 3X/Crows-foot lace. If I get totalled by a B-double, I swear this will be the only thing left in one piece. :smilie39:

I ride 32-spoke Open Pros (supposedly bullet-proof) front and back. Every once in a while, I'll still pop a drive side spoke.:smiley19:

thesmoothdome
03-02-2010, 19:45
If you're serious about making cycling a long lasting fitness hobby, do yourself a favor and get a pro bike fitting. Nothing will turn someone off faster than being in pain in places you shouldn't be and no bike is made for 475lbs. Adjustments can be made to make you more comfortable though. I had mine done about 2 months after getting my bike and I can't even begin to describe how much more comfortable it made me.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4061/4298638020_e013d622a0_b.jpg

20/24 spoke combination fwiw. Pretty sturdy even though I weigh 190lbs.

Trunk_Monkey
03-02-2010, 20:35
20/24 spoke combination fwiw. Pretty sturdy even though I weigh 190lbs.

Those nice straight-pull spoke wheels you've got are, IMO, a bit less prone to snapping spokes under the kind of stress guys my size can put on a bike when mashing the pedals hard.

The ones I've broken over the years have been 1)drive side and 2) at the bend next to the hub.

Doug B
03-09-2010, 22:07
I'm 6 feet, about 230 pounds, riding a Trek 2.3 and love it.

Trying to get to 200 pounds before the end of the summer. I put in the miles... I just like to eat too much, and too much of the wrong stuff.

I really need to work on my diet, or start mixing in a few days of running. Running takes the pounds off quick, imo.

BRsnow
03-16-2010, 20:36
I have an all carbon full suspension Trek EX 9.8 for the mountains here in CO, I love mountain biking...however I just picked up a Trek Soho S to ride around Denver...neat single speed, as long as it doesn't get stolen, I am going to really enjoy it vs driving around the city...BR

Smashee
03-16-2010, 20:49
...neat single speed, as long as it doesn't get stolen,

Nice bike. :smiley20: It'd make a great fixey.

And as a bonus, you'd be able to find anyone who tries to nick it lying injured on the road. :smilie39:

BRsnow
03-16-2010, 20:54
...neat single speed, as long as it doesn't get stolen,

Nice bike. :smiley20: It'd make a great fixey.

And as a bonus, you'd be able to find anyone who tries to nick it lying injured on the road. :smilie39:

It has flip flop hubs, so it might be a fixey at some point:)

cmburch
03-17-2010, 10:08
I have a 5.2 Madone. Carbon may not be the best bike frame for heavy cyclists. My comfortable contoured carbon handlebars snapped when I took a spill. If the bars were aluminum, I could have just kept riding and would still be using it with the aluminum bars.

Nemrod
03-17-2010, 15:07
Another more conventional bike other than a stupid cheap-a-s-mtb is a cross-bike. They look and feel like a roadie but with strong wheels and fatter tires and usually a steel frame. I really want to build one up for all around riding since I live down a dirt road. I hate riding a mountain bike anywhere but on a mountain. Might not be what a really big guy at 300 plus would want but once he gets down in the 200s maybe. Mount up smooth center tires, would roll nice and be a great all around bike.

Soma Double Cross (http://www.somafab.com/doublecross_one.html)

N

chl
03-25-2010, 02:32
@ Nemrod:
That is one classic bike. I started biking a decade after you got that bike, so I rode on Aluminum and mostly ride my all carbon bike now. That Pinarello looks beautiful. I must say pulling the trigger on a Pegoretti has crossed my mind many times.

@ Original Poster:

At 475lbs, there aren't going to be many bikes that can properly support you so shop wisely. Something else you might consider, which I currently do. Go to a 24 Hour Fitness gym (if available) and go to some of the group exercises such as strength, cardio kick boxing or endurance. It's help me stay trim over the winter. The thing to remember is that you won't go at everyone's pace. Finish each class and you'll see that your fitness will improve. Be careful with the low carb diet. I used that to knock off about 40 lbs but I just can't eat chicken breast and broccoli any more. :smilie39:

Health & Strength,

CHL

Nemrod
03-26-2010, 08:01
Another bike suggestion for the OP is the Surly Long Haul Trucker, buy it (for the jumbo guys) with the optional 26 inch mtb tires/wheels.

Complete Bikes | Long Haul Trucker Complete (http://surlybikes.com/bikes/long_haul_trucker_complete/)

BTW, I am ordering Saturday a Surly Cross Check in a 54cm. I need a rugged bike because I live down a dirt road and my wife hates me when I make her carry me and my Italian steel to the pavement. I cannot bear to ride them on, ugh, uh, shhhhhh, dirt!

CHL, I love that Pinarello, I actually have two, both are 56cm c/t and I also have my old steel SLX Guercitto, 56cm c/c currently awaiting a rebuild:

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b395/JRWJR/bikes/PA300141.jpg

My blue Pinarello again, SP/SL tube set, I have just installed new tires a few days ago:

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b395/JRWJR/bikes/PA240126.jpg

My potential new ride, black frame version:

Complete Bikes | Cross Check Complete (http://surlybikes.com/bikes/cross_check_complete/)

The blue Pinarello is still clocking 50 to 75 miles a week either on the road or on rollers, it just got a new decal set plus the new tires for a birthday present. It has titanium axles, titanium cog set and stripped for battle with with it's racing wheel set installed weighs right about 19 pounds.

N

RogerAg
03-26-2010, 11:36
You can spend a lot of money for a bike that you might only use a few times, or you can spend nothing and just walk.
If just walking is boring. Then join Geocaching - The Official Global GPS Cache Hunt Site (http://www.geocaching.com)

cmburch
03-26-2010, 12:32
I got my 5.2 Madone for knee rehabilitation on a work related injury.

It is a lot of bike that I use each day for next to nothing. Except for the expensive carbon handlebar fiasco, I do not see destroying it unless hit by a car.

Nemrod
03-26-2010, 14:50
You can spend a lot of money for a bike that you might only use a few times, or you can spend nothing and just walk.
If just walking is boring. Then join Geocaching - The Official Global GPS Cache Hunt Site (http://www.geocaching.com)

I have ridden my bikes thousands and thousands of miles, if the OP is serious about fitness and loosing weight he would be able to increase his heart rate far above what he would likely do walking and with less impact on his body (unless he goes down in a heap) plus part of the fun cycling is to incorporate it into your lifestyle, errands, commuting, sport, whatever.

N

Nemrod
03-28-2010, 12:46
I just placed an order for a Surly Cross Check black. Hope I like it.

Hope the OP got going on a bike?

N

BRsnow
03-30-2010, 18:26
80 degree in CO today, got out and mountain biked today on the front range. Was great to get on some dry dirt!

ScubaAl
03-31-2010, 13:49
Just got done doing a 32mile ride. Did a loop in Minneapolis that includes lakes, greenway, river road, and Minnehaha Prwky.
Started riding my old Schwinn Clear Creek mtn bike. Had been running but have a persistent hip/groin pain so this is my alternative. Would like to get back to running but for now at least I'm burning some calories.
If/when I can start running again, I will still ride my bike. Seems this will cut down on boredom.
Do have to do something about the sore butt syndrome.

Al

Nemrod
04-03-2010, 19:18
Well, here it is, rode it 25 miles for it's first time on the road, swam a mile that morning before picking it up. I like it, aggressive enough, no hybrid or townie, much faster and fun that a dullard mtb but also much smoother and more comfortable than my Pinarello.

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b395/JRWJR/bikes/IMG_0221.jpg

Oh, BTW, it is really a birthday present for my 57th!
N

thesmoothdome
04-03-2010, 21:55
Nice looking ride Nemrod.

I managed 40 miles yesterday and 53 today with a group that just flys. I was last up every climb and barely hung on on the flats, but the guys were very encouraging. I think these last 2 rides have done more for me than the total sum of rides from the last month.

inventor
04-03-2010, 22:01
Way to smooth the ride. :smiley20: Stay at it man! Some day you'll pass me on the road and I'll be proud to say...

Call 9-1-1!