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mrbeast1414
02-28-2010, 20:33
Yo, I have been searching these marine life threads and I didn't find anything about big oceanic predators, like great whites, tiger, or bull sharks. As a new diver I have seen otters and fish and such (and looooottttsss of kelp ;) but I always worry about if I run into a big predatory fish. I know they teach you to just stay still and if necessary swim away slowly..... but if the fish is aggressive not much you can do? Has anyone encountered any big predatory animal? If so, what happened? thanks

below sea level
02-28-2010, 20:36
The day I see a great white down there is the day I stop diving.

Smashee
02-28-2010, 20:42
Has anyone encountered any big predatory animal? If so, what happened? thanks

I got checked out by a bull shark on a recent dive. It circled me a couple of times just at the edge of visibility then buggered off and left me to it. There's always plenty of them around here, but you very rarely see them while diving.

nrembis
02-28-2010, 20:51
I got bumped by a 10ft Bull shark off Bimini on a night dive back in 1990...neither my buddy or I saw it coming....it was just one slight bump then off it went.....

It shook me up bad enough I didnt do another night dive for a year and a half or so.

inventor
02-28-2010, 21:01
Here Ya go....

Shark Week : Discovery Channel : Shark Behavior and Conservation (http://dsc.discovery.com/convergence/sharkweek/sharkweek.html)

bigman241
02-28-2010, 21:12
When your as big as a I am you do not worry about it. I figure the day a shark is big enough to eat me is the day the dinosaurs have came back. I am more worried about the small stuff that just stings and hurts. I think if the shark wants you you can do what ever you want but live your die your going in his mouth. I told my dad if one gets a hold of me I am going for the eye and or jaw line. I saw on dirty jobs they have no bones just tendons so I will start with the eye then go to the jaw. Then hope I ant dead.
But I tried to catch a baby gator in salt springs fl with mom sitting in the weeds.

mrbeast1414
02-28-2010, 21:57
The day I see a great white down there is the day I stop diving.
well put

DevilDiver
02-28-2010, 22:14
How, When, & Where Sharks Attack

Worldwide there are probably 70-100 shark attacks annually resulting in about 5-15 deaths. We say "probably" because not all shark attacks are reported; our information from Third World countries is especially poor, and in other areas efforts are sometimes made to keep attack quiet for fear of bad publicity. Historically the death rate was much higher than today, but the advent of readily available emergency services and improved medical treatment has greatly reduced the chances of mortality. Actual numbers of shark attacks certainly are going up each decade (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/sharks/statistics/trends.htm) because of increasing numbers of bathers in the water, but there is no indication that there is any change in the per capita rate of attack.

Most attacks occur in nearshore waters, typically inshore of a sandbar or between sandbars where sharks feed and can become trapped at low tide. Areas with steep dropoffs are also likely attack sites. Sharks congregate there because their natural food items also congregate in these areas.

There are three major kinds of unprovoked shark attacks. By far the most common are "hit and run" attacks. These typically occur in the surf zone with swimmers and surfers the normal targets. The victim seldom sees its attacker and the shark does not return after inflicting a single bite or slash wound. In most instances, these probably are cases of mistaken identity that occur under conditions of poor water visibility and a harsh physical environment (breaking surf and strong wash/current conditions). A feeding shark in this habitat must make quick decisions and rapid movements to capture its traditional food items. When these difficult physical conditions are considered in conjunction with provocative human appearance and activities associated with aquatic recreation (splashing, shiny jewelry, contrasting colored swimsuits, contrasting tanning, especially involving the soles of the feet), it is not surprising that sharks might occasionally misinterpret a human for its normal prey. We suspect that, upon biting, the shark quickly realizes that the human is a foreign object, or that it is too large, and immediately releases the victim and does not return. Some of these attacks could also be related to social behaviors unrelated to feeding, such as dominance behaviors seen in many land animals. Injuries to "hit and run" victims are usually confined to relatively small lacerations, often on the leg below the knee, and are seldom life-threatening.

"Bump and bite" attacks and "sneak" attacks, while less common, result in greater injuries and most fatalities. These types of attack usually involve divers or swimmers in somewhat deeper waters, but occur in nearshore shallows in some areas of the world. "Bump and bite" attacks are characterized by the shark initially circling and often bumping the victim prior to the actual attack. "Sneak" attacks differ in having the strike occur without warning. In both cases, unlike the pattern for "hit and run" attacks, repeat attacks are not uncommon and multiple or sustained bites are the norm. Injuries incurred during this type of attack are usually quite severe, frequently resulting in death. We believe these types of attack are the result of feeding or antagonistic behaviors rather than being cases of mistaken identity. Most shark attacks involving sea disasters, e.g. plane and ship accidents, probably involve "bump and bite" and "sneak" attacks.

Almost any large shark, roughly two meters or longer in total length, is a potential threat to humans. Three species, however, have been repetitively implicated as the primary attackers of man: the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/Whiteshark/whiteshark.html)), tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/Tigershark/tigershark.htm)) and bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/bullshark/bullshark.htm)). All are cosmopolitan in distribution, reach large sizes, and consume large prey items such as marine mammals, sea turtles, and fishes as normal elements of their diets. These species probably are responsible for a large portion of "bump and bite" and "sneak" attacks. Other species, including the great hammerhead (Sphyrna mokarran) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/GreatHammerhead/GHammerhead.html), shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrhynchus) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/ShortfinMako/Shortfinmako.html), oceanic whitetip (Carcharhinus longimanus) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/OceanicWT/OceanicWT.html), Galapagos (Carcharhinus galapagensis) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/GalapagosShark/Galapagosshark.html), and certain reef sharks (such as the Caribbean reef shark, (Carcharhinus perezi) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/CReefShark/CReefShark.htm) have been implicated in these style of attacks. We know less about the offending parties in "hit and run" cases since the shark is seldom observed, but it is safe to assume that a large suite of species might be involved. Evidence from Florida, which has 20-30 of these type attacks per year, suggests that the blacktip (Carcharhinus limbatus) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/Blacktip/Blacktipshark.html)[possibly spinner (Carcharhinus brevipinna) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/spinnershark/spinnershark.html) and blacknose (Carcharhinus acronotus) (http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/Gallery/Descript/BlacknoseShark/BlacknoseShark.html)] sharks are the major culprits in this region.

George H. Burgess, International Shark Attack File
Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida

boates
03-01-2010, 07:43
In all my years diving, I've seen sharks on 3 dives/trips
T&C off a liveaboard, numerous gray reef sharks, most every dive
Bonaire, 1 lrg nurse shark
N.S. Canada, 1 guitar shark. Speaking of here, we have many whites. basking,mako,blue, pretty much name 'em, we have 'em! Unfortunately Halifax hosts a hugh Int'l shark (rod 'n reel) fishing derby every summer, but that's another story. The Marine Institute does get lots of data from attending and examining the catch. Who's to say.
At least twice a summer, on our north shore (between N.S. and P.E.I.), an unsuspecting fisherman will hook a white, fight it till he sees what he has, releases it, and has a whale of a tale to tell of the high seas!
That being said, I haven't dove(dived?) in white,tiger,or bull "hot spots" :weirdlook:

Smashee
03-01-2010, 13:39
In all my years diving, I've seen sharks on 3 dives/trips

It's a rare dive here that you *don't* see a shark. :smiley36:
Most common (and probably responsible for most sharks bites on divers) are wobbegongs. They're placid, bottom-dwelling ambush predators that lie around doing an impression of a carpet until a fish gets too close. They're not aggressive and will let you get quite close before swimming off but should be treated with respect. Because of their colouring, an unlucky or careless diver or snorkeller may accidentally tread on them which can get you a nasty bite.
Grey Nurse sharks (sand tigers?) are around in the winter months with leopard sharks & catsharks also regularly spotted.

The big biteys (bull, tiger & Great White) are always around, but tend to avoid divers. Bull sharks are plentiful and there's a couple of places I'd never swim, but they prefer hunting in poor vis. waters. Tigers & GWS are occasionally spotted by fishos, but hardly ever by divers. The day I spot a GWS underwater is (knowing my luck!) the day I've left my camera on the boat.

bigman241
03-01-2010, 17:09
If I hook one. I will strap myself to my jeeep reel it in and pull out the glock and be done with it.
In all my years diving, I've seen sharks on 3 dives/trips
T&C off a liveaboard, numerous gray reef sharks, most every dive
Bonaire, 1 lrg nurse shark
N.S. Canada, 1 guitar shark. Speaking of here, we have many whites. basking,mako,blue, pretty much name 'em, we have 'em! Unfortunately Halifax hosts a hugh Int'l shark (rod 'n reel) fishing derby every summer, but that's another story. The Marine Institute does get lots of data from attending and examining the catch. Who's to say.
At least twice a summer, on our north shore (between N.S. and P.E.I.), an unsuspecting fisherman will hook a white, fight it till he sees what he has, releases it, and has a whale of a tale to tell of the high seas!
That being said, I haven't dove(dived?) in white,tiger,or bull "hot spots" :weirdlook:

boates
03-02-2010, 05:14
Why, Bigman, why...

navyhmc
03-02-2010, 06:54
I'm with boates on both counts:

I've seen a handful of nurse and smaller sharks, one tiger (we called the planned night dive on that one!) and a couple of hammerheads and Bulls.. Nothing that freaked me out or made me feel like I was in danger.

As for the later: Why? You do realize that sharks as a phylum (Chondrichthys) are shrinking rapidly to the point that there are 201 species on the endangered list soon. link: Endangered Shark Species (http://www.shark.ch/Database/EndangeredSharks/index.html?lim=1&slang=2)

emclean
03-02-2010, 07:11
If I hook one. I will strap myself to my jeep reel it in and pull out the glock and be done with it.
that's not right, I mean a glock, combat tupperwear.

boates
03-02-2010, 08:55
If I hook one. I will strap myself to my jeep reel it in and pull out the glock and be done with it. that's not right, I mean a glock, combat tupperwear.

Do we have identical twins?

LeeParrish
03-02-2010, 09:15
You have a higher chance of being killed by a falling coconut than a shark, so do we need to cut down all the coconut trees? Over 100 people are killed every day in cars on average daily in the US alone, and nobody is calling for "death to all cars". Sharks are a minor risk compared to the dangers we face in everyday life. I'll personally take my odds with the sharks over the drivers on the freeway.

Personally I've only dove with whitetip and gray reef sharks, but never felt at all worried by them. If anything I was a bit disappointed when they weren't around, they are very interesting creatures.

Trunk_Monkey
03-02-2010, 13:24
I'd love to see some sharks on a dive (although a GW or a big Tiger would make me mighty nervous) as long as it's not up close and personal.

Just not too many sharks at once please:smiley_crossbones:.

ccoceangirl
03-02-2010, 21:01
I love when I dive and see sharks! I get a little disappointed when I have been on a lot of dives and haven't seen one in a while. I have only dove with nurse and blacktip, but I am pretty sure I would feel the same about any shark. However, I will not purposely place my self in the middle of a bunch of feeding sharks either. You won't find me cage diving in a middle of a bunch of great whites, but I do love it when I see them on dives.

huvrr
03-07-2010, 05:34
When your as big as a I am you do not worry about it. I figure the day a shark is big enough to eat me is the day the dinosaurs have came back. I am more worried about the small stuff that just stings and hurts. I think if the shark wants you you can do what ever you want but live your die your going in his mouth. I told my dad if one gets a hold of me I am going for the eye and or jaw line. I saw on dirty jobs they have no bones just tendons so I will start with the eye then go to the jaw. Then hope I ant dead.
But I tried to catch a baby gator in salt springs fl with mom sitting in the weeds.
Jist how big iszz yeh??

huvrr
03-07-2010, 05:38
Oh yeah, for some good shark diving action the NOVA special that is viewable on your PC is called, I think, "Shark Mountain" the night dive post here made me think of that. It is a well done video and worth checking out.

Splitlip
03-07-2010, 06:26
I have found the most effective shark deterrent to be a camera.

RogerAg
03-07-2010, 10:30
Check out "My Photo"

navyhmc
03-07-2010, 18:13
I have found the most effective shark deterrent to be a camera.


:smilie39: Soo True! That or asking" Are there sharks around here? I hope so I want to see a few." That will either get you nothing or the biggest group of black tips waiting for the squid migration and a front row seat for a feeding frenzy! :yikes:

inventor
04-06-2010, 18:29
Wasn't sure where to post this, or even start a thread about it. Just think it's cool.

Great white shark amazes scientists with 4,000-foot dive into abyss, by Pete Thomas (http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/blog/16855/great+white+shark+amazes+scientists+with+4000-foot+dive+into+abyss/)

Maybe he's looking for that sub?