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sfbluestar
03-06-2010, 08:01
I have noticed quite a few people have different safety views for SCUBA-diving solo and free-diving solo. While they think SCUBA-diving solo is a bad idea, they believe free-diving solo is OK. Why the difference?

I would think both are risky in their own right -- SCUBA is more complicated but free-diving has very little margin of error on air supply -- which makes them EQUALLY risky.

comet24
03-06-2010, 08:06
Both have their own safety concerns that need to be understood by anyone participating in them.

SCUBA can put in more dangerous places simple because you go down with a supply of air. This always more time underwater to get into trouble. It can also provide a false sense of security. Free diving you know you need to be able to get back to the surface in a matter of minutes at most.

captain
03-06-2010, 09:21
Entanglement being high on the, list if not #1 of hazards while diving solo the free diver is very much more at risk than the scuba diver.

ltowles
03-06-2010, 12:27
Free divers have shallow water black out.

While I will sometimes solo dive (scuba with full redundancy, a lot of caution, and extra large safety margins), I will never free dive with out a buddy. There is just no warning nor surefire way to prevent it. You have to be prepared, your buddy watches you when you surface and you watch him.

Louis

in_cavediver
03-06-2010, 18:13
I think you might find your sample size off. I don't free dive and I don't know many divers around my parts that do. (mostly becuase the water is to darn cold to swim in without a heavy wetsuit or drysuit) Given that, I have ZERO opinions on free diving practices but plenty on SCUBA practices.

You might be confusing no opinion with approval as it relates to solo free diving.

fisheater
03-07-2010, 00:16
I've dove solo and will do so again. I carry a redundant air supply, have a VERY conservative dive plan and take it easy.

However, I won't freedive solo. As pointed out above, the risk of shallow water blackout makes freediving solo too dangerous for me. You can't predict when it'll hit and you can't feel it coming on. Your only chance of survival is an alert and available dive buddy.

Largo
03-07-2010, 09:28
I think the key variable is site selection, and dive profile.

Diving near a fishing pier is a bad idea, even with a buddy, because the risk of entanglement is very high.

If you're diving deep, the risk of N Narcosis necessitates the presence of a buddy.

cmburch
03-08-2010, 08:52
The shallower depths at which most of us freedive in Northern California may not have as much a chance of shallow water blackout as the deeper depths for Southern California freedivers. It is not a good idea to freedive solo with our limited visibility, kelp, cold water, rocky cliffs/shores, unpredictable conditions, currents, rogue waves, surge, etc.

Under good conditions in Monterey Bay; Breakwater, MacAbee Beach, Lover's Point Cove may be snorkeled and freedived solo. Be sure to be visible (kayak/Boogie board, bright snorkel) so boaters do not run over you at these popular locations.

Freedivers can develop better swim skills and an understanding of the ocean which will help with SCUBA diving.

You're invited to come out with us in April for Abalone. It is fun just getting wet, swimming around sightseeing if you are not interested in spearfishing or Abalone.

I do freedive solo the first weeks of April, August and the end of November if the conditions are not too bad. (If I can not find a Buddy)

Even with a buddy, we are essentially freediving solo due to the limited visibility we normally have. How do you keep track of where your buddy is exactly, which direction did they go on the bottom, or how long underwater? They could be a considerable distance away in any direction from where they submerged.

sfbluestar
03-08-2010, 11:28
I think I found at least one reason I always tire out during dives -- weight belt.

My weight belt is not balanced right plus too loose so it slips down to my butt; I constantly had to kick just to maintain body orientation. During yesterday's dive I pulled the belt up with my hand and kept it at my waist, whoa! felt and instant relief on my legs.

cmburch
03-08-2010, 11:44
How much weight do you have?

Some quick fixes would be to move larger weights to the sides of your hips. Distribute the weight, so the belt does not rotate while diving. Switch to a steel buckle if using plastic. When rubber belts go on sale, buy a thick one. Learn how to bend over and carefully readjust/tighten your belt at the surface without dropping it.

Noob
03-08-2010, 11:55
I think I found at least one reason I always tire out during dives -- weight belt.

My weight belt is not balanced right plus too loose so it slips down to my butt; I constantly had to kick just to maintain body orientation. During yesterday's dive I pulled the belt up with my hand and kept it at my waist, whoa! felt and instant relief on my legs.

Are you using a nylon belt? If so use a rubber belt. As the wetsuit constricts the nylon will not rubber belt will constrict some. It will keep the belt tighter to your waist instead of around your knees.

Nemrod
03-10-2010, 19:45
I think I found at least one reason I always tire out during dives -- weight belt.

My weight belt is not balanced right plus too loose so it slips down to my butt; I constantly had to kick just to maintain body orientation. During yesterday's dive I pulled the belt up with my hand and kept it at my waist, whoa! felt and instant relief on my legs.

You are over weighted and incorrectly trimmed. N