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View Full Version : I need a better camera...maybe a strobe



divinjen
09-05-2007, 10:41
So I am using a sea life dc 600 right now and I am not all that impressed. I try and get close up shots of all the sea life and it never seems to capture the colors or anything. Is this something I am doing wrong or is it the camera?? I need help :smiley19: I love taking pictures but I see everyone else's and they look so...professional and great that it makes me just want to hide mine :smiley5:

Divingguy
09-05-2007, 16:36
I looked at the Oriskany pics. I'm thinking you just need a strobe. Don't be so hard on yourself.

Aussie
09-05-2007, 18:26
So I am using a sea life dc 600 right now and I am not all that impressed. I try and get close up shots of all the sea life and it never seems to capture the colors or anything. Is this something I am doing wrong or is it the camera?? I need help :smiley19: I love taking pictures but I see everyone else's and they look so...professional and great that it makes me just want to hide mine :smiley5:

I would practice with your macro shots. Get up really close to the small things. This helps when the small things dont move too. The flash on compact cameras is really only good for 1-2 feet. I noticed your using the wide angle lens. This is good to gather more light. Leave it on for macro too.

You wide angle shots on the wreck are about as good as you will get with a compact. Maybe you can play with them a little in photoshop to bring them out a bit. You used the natural light available well also. You be surprised what a little bit of editing will do to your shots.

Practice practice practice and then practice some more.

Especially with macro as you can get some really good shots from compacts in macro mode with the internal strobe.

I would play with the macro mode and edit some of your favourite shots before investing in a strobe. Once your happy with your macro then think about strobe/s. All they are doing is increasing your range by a foot or two.

Any Questions drop me a line.

Aussie

Cheddarchick
09-05-2007, 18:33
Aussie, great advice....

DevilDiver
09-05-2007, 20:18
I looked at your pictures and thought they were great. I really like the black and whites.(The DC 600 takes great B/W underwater)

I have the DC600 and the DC 500. I am not sure of your set-up but here is what I would suggest:
1. You need to disable the digital zoom in set-up. Stick with the optical only.
2. Invest in at least 1 strobe, 2 if possible.
3. You need the wide angle lens. This will enable you to zoom in closer and still get the subject in frame.
4. You will need the diffusers for the strobes.

I will be happy to share the many ways I have set these systems up send tried to use them. Just PM me with queations....

**You talked about hovering to get the photo of the Jawfish. To get close to allot of fish you need to stop relax and wait. Let the fish relax and get on with their normal behavior. Try not to scare them with your bubbles(re-breather?) One thing to try is not to swim at the fish. Swim slowly to the side and avoid eye contact, after it gets used to you try to set up your shot.

Aussie
09-05-2007, 21:57
Before I would invest in one or two strobes I would think about were you want to go with your photography. Its alot of money to outlay on strobes when down the track you may upgrade to a better camera or even a DSLR.
It might be a good idea to either look at strobes that are well suited for a DSLR (ie Ikelite ds125) or use the money that you were going to use on the strobes for your compact and put towards a DSLR setup.

It gets to a point were you have to think about how much money you want to spend on underwater photography.

Just my 5 cents.......we dont have 2 cents over here anymore

Aussie

FishFood
09-05-2007, 22:14
DONT, DONT, DONT use the zoom. Optical OR Digital. ALWAYS get physicaly close! The optical zoom is a crutch that, unless you're about to miss the shot of the century, you shouldnt use. By getting close to your subject, youll get more colors.

divinjen
09-06-2007, 13:31
Thank you all so much for the advice! I unfortunately cannot buy a strobe at the moment, so Aussie, your info was very much welcomed! Devil, thanks for the compliments on the photos- I assume you mean the ones around the lake. thanks alot! I like them too! :) Fish food- I try to get as close as possible, but for the detail and color that some people have...man I just don't know!

I 'hover' I don't know how else to describe it!! LOL I do the rebreathing and all. it's funny to watch (or so I am told) because the fish and stuff don't notice I am there and continue along their merry way :D

divechaplain-sara
09-06-2007, 15:17
Jen, I checked out your pictures. You've got some great ones. I love the quotation that you have in your signature--there's a deep truth in it.

divinjen
09-06-2007, 15:33
Jen, I checked out your pictures. You've got some great ones. I love the quotation that you have in your signature--there's a deep truth in it.
Thanks! I was looking for a quote for my friend and I came across it, I was like WOW that is so true!!! I had a blonde moment! lol

BobArnold8265
09-09-2007, 21:25
Jen,

I think you're having the exact same problem that I used to have (and sometimes still do). It mostly comes down to lighting. The flash that comes on most digital cameras these days are not very powerful (good to around 12 feet on land and about 2 feet underwater).

You basically have three choices.

1. Add a more powerful strobe. Yes some of these can be pricey but you I disagree that you should wait and buy a really nice strobe that you can grow into. Less powerful strobes are usually smaller and lighter and always come in handy and a secondary source of light when (or if) you add a second strobe. They're also nice when shooting close-up since they allow you to get into tight spaces.

2. Get closer to your subjects (0 to 3 feet max).

3. Buy a red filter. This will help pull out more color in your shots. It works best with natural light so is really only practical in fairly shallow (no more than 40 feet), clear water on a sunny day.

I used to shoot with a 35mm camera and switched to digital about a year ago. It took me several dive trips to "dial in" the digital camera. It's only been in the past 4 or 5 months that I've been pleased with my pictures. Every camera is different so just keep shooting and fine tune your adjustments and in no time your pictures will look great.