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bigman241
05-30-2010, 21:33
In florida I got 25to 30 min out of a steel 120 on the first two dives. 35 out of the third and I think 40 out of the 4th and 5th. So if I go alum 80 what will be my expected air time. I know hard to tell as going fresh water I know more as to what I am doing and will not be stressed as much. But lets be honest we all know I am over weight and out of shape. :smiley36:

bigman241
05-30-2010, 21:35
wow I just got that I wanna dive filling like I did when I walked into the dive shop in Florida. LOL I am going diving this week even if it is in the 1 foot deep creek in the front of our shop. lol

Straegen
05-30-2010, 21:54
Overweight has some to do with it, but it has WAY more to do with being new and not breathing slow and steady. You are probably still "fighting" with buoyancy, the newness of it all, etc and sucking up a bunch of air. I don't want to throw anyone under the bus, but one DM in FL I dive with is a big fellow and he breathes one tank for all the dives of the day and usually finishes with more than any of us. He easily breathes 1/3 the rate I do. He gives me hope that one day I can have a two hour bottom time on an AL80 at 60' (I don't know what his real rate is but I wouldn't be surprised if it is in that ballpark).

How deep were those dives?

Assuming the same depth, you would be going from 120cuft to 77cuft. You would have about 35% less time all things being equal.

Try humming when you exhale. It really helped slow down my breathing and really improved my buoyancy.

Splitlip
05-30-2010, 22:07
Overweight has some to do with it, but it has WAY more to do with being new and not breathing slow and steady. You are probably still "fighting" with buoyancy, the newness of it all, etc and sucking up a bunch of air. I don't want to throw anyone under the bus, but one DM in FL I dive with is a big fellow and he breathes one tank for all the dives of the day and usually finishes with more than any of us. He easily breathes 1/3 the rate I do. He gives me hope that one day I can have a two hour bottom time on an AL80 at 60' (I don't know what his real rate is but I wouldn't be surprised if it is in that ballpark).

How deep were those dives?

Assuming the same depth, you would be going from 120cuft to 77cuft. You would have about 35% less time all things being equal.

Try humming when you exhale. It really helped slow down my breathing and really improved my buoyancy.

Actually another variable is what pressure did he turn the dives. Turning with 800 psi in al 80 will mean he used about 50 CF while turning the dive at 800 in an HP 120 gives about 90 CF (55% or about HALF the time with an 80). Turning with 800 in a LP 120 gives him about 80 CF.

navyhmc
05-31-2010, 02:42
The better question is what was your profile on those dives? Average depth for the time will help figure it out as well as start and ending psi's. And HP vs. LP too.

Vlane
05-31-2010, 11:11
Getting the hang of buoyancy and your depth will be the biggest factors in determining the amount of bottom time you get out of your tank. Newer divers tend to vent and inflate their BCs more than needed because they are still getting the hang of remaining neutrally buoyant, I still have a little trouble with mine sometimes even though I have over 30 dives. Just remember to remain calm and if you think you need more air in your BC just give it a quick hit of air then wait a few seconds to see if you need more.

bigman241
06-01-2010, 06:26
we went down to 30 and 50 foot on the first to dives. Then to 55 on the third. The 4th and 5 where around 55 to 60. on 5 we swam around alot but stayed at deep most of the time.

bigman241
06-01-2010, 06:27
ohhh we turned when I hit between 500 and 800 on my tank. He told me to let him know when I hit 1000 which I did and we was heading up not to long after that. Expect for the one time when we where swimming along and I forgot and hit 500

Edit

I was inflating deflating alot. my weight was heavy so when I would need to swam up over a ledge I would inflate ofcourse when I went up 10 feet I would start heading up alot and deflate and then start it all over. I think working my weight and this out on 4 and 5 got me the extra time.

jbres1
06-01-2010, 06:46
With all things being the same, you would get about 1/3 rd less bottom time.
( 77 cu ft / 120 cu ft = 64% )

If you could find a used steel 100 or a LP95 I think you would be much better off than an al 80. You would have 20% more air and be able to remove 5 lbs of weight.


Jim Breslin

scubastud
06-01-2010, 06:49
Big guy remember. Your inflator is not an elevator button.

SkuaSeptember
06-01-2010, 13:44
Hi Bigman,
I've read this and numerous others of your posts and it seems from here in the cheap seats that many of your issues and questions are the result of concepts that were not adequately covered and or mastered in your OW class. Thats a real shame.:smiley13:
There are a lot of things that you can learn from an online discussion, but it is not the same as the immediate feedback you can get live and in person. That being said, it might be prudent for you to invest in your own comfort and safety by spending some time with a DIFFERENT instructor. Print off some of the questions you've posted here, bring them along and have an honest discussion. Find out how much they want to spend a day or two diving with you and then offer to buy lunch too!
Best of luck and be safe.

Splitlip
06-01-2010, 15:51
Hi Bigman,
I've read this and numerous others of your posts and it seems from here in the cheap seats that many of your issues and questions are the result of concepts that were not adequately covered and or mastered in your OW class. Thats a real shame.:smiley13:
There are a lot of things that you can learn from an online discussion, but it is not the same as the immediate feedback you can get live and in person. That being said, it might be prudent for you to invest in your own comfort and safety by spending some time with a DIFFERENT instructor. Print off some of the questions you've posted here, bring them along and have an honest discussion. Find out how much they want to spend a day or two diving with you and then offer to buy lunch too!
Best of luck and be safe.

It irks me that every new diver I see is terribly over weighted. I know it is easier for the instructors. Better over weighted than under I guess for them. But maybe after all the skills are done, they should have their students leave them knowing how much weight they really need.

Glub000
06-01-2010, 16:07
Hi Bigman,
I've read this and numerous others of your posts and it seems from here in the cheap seats that many of your issues and questions are the result of concepts that were not adequately covered and or mastered in your OW class. Thats a real shame.:smiley13:
There are a lot of things that you can learn from an online discussion, but it is not the same as the immediate feedback you can get live and in person. That being said, it might be prudent for you to invest in your own comfort and safety by spending some time with a DIFFERENT instructor. Print off some of the questions you've posted here, bring them along and have an honest discussion. Find out how much they want to spend a day or two diving with you and then offer to buy lunch too!
Best of luck and be safe.

It irks me that every new diver I see is terribly over weighted. I know it is easier for the instructors. Better over weighted than under I guess for them. But maybe after all the skills are done, they should have their students leave them knowing how much weight they really need.

+1 After my open water cert I dove with way to much weight. I started with a different instructor and he knocked off quite a few lbs and improved alot of my skills in my first session.

Splitlip
06-01-2010, 16:18
Hi Bigman,
I've read this and numerous others of your posts and it seems from here in the cheap seats that many of your issues and questions are the result of concepts that were not adequately covered and or mastered in your OW class. Thats a real shame.:smiley13:
There are a lot of things that you can learn from an online discussion, but it is not the same as the immediate feedback you can get live and in person. That being said, it might be prudent for you to invest in your own comfort and safety by spending some time with a DIFFERENT instructor. Print off some of the questions you've posted here, bring them along and have an honest discussion. Find out how much they want to spend a day or two diving with you and then offer to buy lunch too!
Best of luck and be safe.

It irks me that every new diver I see is terribly over weighted. I know it is easier for the instructors. Better over weighted than under I guess for them. But maybe after all the skills are done, they should have their students leave them knowing how much weight they really need.

+1 After my open water cert I dove with way to much weight. I started with a different instructor and he knocked off quite a few lbs and improved alot of my skills in my first session.

Yup. All skills seem to improve once we nail buoyancy.

bigman241
06-01-2010, 21:45
I agree guys. I do not think it is the instructor so much the shop owner. He said here you need this. After the first dive my instructor removed some. He did this again after the second dive. The next day I dove with the same weight as the second. Then on 4 and 5 the second instructor that was with my group told me to drop another few pounds. I ended up at 44 pounds and she told me the next time I dove to drop 4 pounds or so. I got three al80s today and plan on having my weight here soon. then I am going to go to the pool at the club house by our cabin. It is a community pool inside a home owner assc. and I should have no issue with checking it all there.

scubastud
06-02-2010, 04:57
The good news is, once you get the weights right, you are set. Remember to enter a lot of information in your log , it is a good reference for further dives.
I used to push that darn button too much, and adjust a lot. This really sucks the air. Teeny itty bitty little tap of the inflator. You will be (as I was) suprised at how much air you will save!
If you are inflating to go up.. well that isn't right and rather dangerous.

Oh and another +1 on Splitlip's post. I know there is a lot to do during OW classes. but bouyancy and proper weighting is part of the lesson and it would be nice if instructors take a little more time helping sudents understand how to properly gear up for a dive. Another part of this is weight distribution. I have found that a little adjustment of the weights make a lot of difference.