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bigman241
06-08-2010, 23:25
A friend and business associate talked me into going to the city counsel meeting. After the meeting I got talking to the fire chief and asked about them filling my scuba tanks.

He told me they would be happy to and do it for another local diver. I offered to "donate" some money to the fire dept for the trouble he said not needed and even said they have the adapter to fill the tanks.

So free air right down the road. :smiley32::smiley36::smiley36::smiley31:

Is there any thing I need to do or check when they fill them with their compressor I know there are possible issues with the quality of air but since they fill other scuba tanks should I not be worried about it?

navyhmc
06-09-2010, 02:36
I'd still be a little concerned. The requirements for SCBA air is different that SCUBA. For starters, the average SCBA will never go below 1ATA, so the issues with PPM of CO, hydrocarbons, moisture are different. Before I go after them t ofill on a regualr basis, I would make sure that their testing is in line with Grade E air for Scuba. If they meet all of those requirements, go for it.

A lot of the time, the FD's do neet all the requirements and actually use the same filters and follow the same scheduels as those for SCUBA, but I'd check first. After all, it's YOU that has to trust the air!

mitsuguy
06-09-2010, 06:15
yup... main difference is that Grade D air is suitable for SCBA, whereas Grade E is required for SCUBA...

they will have a little air examination chart on the wall somewhere, or on file that will easily show you - Grade D, no good, Grade E, good...

Rileybri
06-09-2010, 06:18
the other consideration is weather they can fill a HP 130 to its 3500 psi rating or not. Filling an avg. AL80 is not the same as filling a HP 130.....

MagnaBoxer
06-09-2010, 06:31
the other consideration is weather they can fill a HP 130 to its 3500 psi rating or not. Filling an avg. AL80 is not the same as filling a HP 130.....

I believe the SCBA's that firefighters carry are rated at 4500 psi, so filling even a HP scuba cylinder shouldn't be a problem.

mitsuguy
06-09-2010, 06:58
the other consideration is weather they can fill a HP 130 to its 3500 psi rating or not. Filling an avg. AL80 is not the same as filling a HP 130.....

I believe the SCBA's that firefighters carry are rated at 4500 psi, so filling even a HP scuba cylinder shouldn't be a problem.

Not all, but most are... They typically use a fiber wrapped aluminum bottle, or a completely composite cylinder, and have pressure ratings, as noted, to 4500 psi...

bigman241
06-09-2010, 07:09
THis hit me shortly after talking to him but he had left before I could ask
the other consideration is weather they can fill a HP 130 to its 3500 psi rating or not. Filling an avg. AL80 is not the same as filling a HP 130.....

rustyshakelford
06-09-2010, 08:37
they either use (2.2) 2216 psi bottles or (4.5) 4500 psi bottles as stated. depending on what type of cascade system they have will determine they pressure you can go to. i would just ask them and see what they have their banks at. we keep six banks at 6000 psi so i would be able to get whatever i want and just have to set the regulator where you need it.

alot of time fire chiefs like to make promises that suprise the fireman and catch them off gaurd. If i were you, i would bring some brownies or cookies of the like...ice cream is always good. once they get to know you i bet they would fill your bottles for you and bs. sometimes when we are blindsided by things some people might get a bit of a attitude!

look at the condition of the cascade also. if it is a newer mako and kept up, i would bet the air is fire. at my dept. it has triple filters and i could use it as 02 clean air. check the paperwork on it. usually posted on the compressor control panel or near it.

enjoy

brett

Rcontrera
06-13-2010, 20:45
Please do remember that most fire station compressors are the property of a city, county or some other government agency. Asking a fire fighter to give you a fill can, sometimes cost him/her their job.

As has already been mentioned, there are also different specs for SCBA air than for diving. While most fire stations equipped with modern compressors put out great air, there are still quite a few that don't. And it is impossible to tell which is which from the outside of the compressor.

bigman241
06-14-2010, 06:04
The guy I talked to is the fire chief. He told me they fill another guys tank which makes me think it should be ok. I doubt anyone would care everyone is easy going around here.

tfd86
06-14-2010, 07:25
Ya it's a great option to have saves me a couple hundred dollars a year

navyhmc
06-14-2010, 07:29
As other's have said: Even though it's okay from the chief, the guys on the floor are going to be doing the work. Meet with them, talk with them and I have never known a fire fighter that will turn down ice cream. A gallon or two now and again is a very good gesture. Don't overuse the privedge either, coming up every other day for air is not kosher in it's own right. I have the same privledge here that I only use on a very few specific ocassions and it's always accomanied with said ice cream-enough for the whole shift.

cummings66
06-16-2010, 14:55
My local fire department won't take anything from me, I've tried many times but no dice. I also don't abuse the privilege, I only do that when there is no other choice. I don't like to be a mooch.

mfolsom
06-18-2010, 07:13
I use FD air too. No problems with it so far and several guys I no use it as well. I've offered to help them any way I can on a volunteer basis.

acamato
06-29-2010, 08:13
Here is a chart that compares the different SCBA and SCUBA air specs: http://www.airchecklab.com/assets/docs/08AirSpecs.pdf

The NFPA spec has a lower CO (5 vs 10ppm) and Oil (2 vs 5ppm) requirement that Grade E, however the O2 range is greater 19.5-23.5% vs 20-22%.

KWS
07-02-2010, 14:46
yup... main difference is that Grade D air is suitable for SCBA, whereas Grade E is required for SCUBA...

they will have a little air examination chart on the wall somewhere, or on file that will easily show you - Grade D, no good, Grade E, good...


YOU COUGHT ME BY SURPRISE. when did grade e become required for scuba non nitrox use?

mitsuguy
07-02-2010, 14:59
yup... main difference is that Grade D air is suitable for SCBA, whereas Grade E is required for SCUBA...

they will have a little air examination chart on the wall somewhere, or on file that will easily show you - Grade D, no good, Grade E, good...


YOU COUGHT ME BY SURPRISE. when did grade e become required for scuba non nitrox use?

afaik, it has always been required for scuba... Modified Grade E is required for an O2 clean environment...