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JahJahwarrior
07-09-2007, 22:27
I want to mention how much I love my 100's, and how much I hate them. I was going to provide a link to ST to show where you can buy them, but it looks like they don't carry these tanks. I bought mine used from a local shop.

They hold 20 cubic feet of air that an 80 can't, but at a tradeoff: both companies that make aluminum 100's only make one kind, and it's 100 cubic feet at 3300 psi. If you get a 3k fill, then it's only 91 cu. feet of air. Still, not too bad!

I don't know numbers for bouyancy, but I do know weight: I believe my tanks weigh a little over 40 pounds each. I didn't think it was bad until I had a little walk to the water at a local spring. These tanks are heavy! However, my back doesn't hurt as much now when I dive as it used to, in other words, if you use these tanks, your back eventually will get stronger. You do have to be careful that you carry them correctly or you will hurt yourself. They do weigh more than an 80!! Bouyancy wise, they don't float when full! I was showing off to a friend who the gear is weightless in the water, and I grabbed a buddies tank and threw it in the pool. It sank. Found out why later: it was a 100! (I later picked up two of the exact same tank from a local shop on sale, used.) When empty, these aren't quite as bouyant as an 80 if I remember correctly. I think you could take off two pounds if you moved to one of these, which doesn't help me much, when all of my weights are 5 pounders and I dive with three of them....

Finish: Mine are brushed aluminum, and I like it. My buddy has two non-matching painted ones, and they look like crap. Mine do show some signs of corrosion and wear, you can see slight colour differences where a previous user had bands on them to use them as stage bottles. Not quite rust, but a little different colour. Still looks better than chipped paint! I do not like shotblast tanks very much, but if buying new, I'd prefer shotblast over painted.

All said and done, I love my Luxfer aluminum 100's, and would reccomend them again. Good for the person who wants more bottom time, can haul the weight, and doesn't want to invest in steel tanks just yet. I'm sure Joe and Larry can get them for you if youw anted some. However, if you are female or you have a great SAC, I'd almost say stick with an 80, and if you have the money, I'd say go LP95 steels....

Wolfie2012
07-09-2007, 22:30
I think I'll stick with my steel 130's ;) If only I could find a way to eat underwater, I might never come up!

ScubaToys Joe
07-09-2007, 22:47
I'm with you jahjahwarrior. And we normally stock the 100's. And can get them in if we don't have them in stock... but that 3300 psi thing makes it not work for a lot of folks. Our compressor is set up no problem, but a lot of fill stations - as you point out - just won't bother adjust for 1 guys tanks.


So if anyone is really looking for them - give a shout - but we are doing a lot more steel tanks for the guys who want more air.

frankc420
07-09-2007, 23:05
Manufacturer & Nominal Capacity: Luxfer
Service pressure psi: 3300
Actual air capacity, ft3: 99.3
Outer diameter, in: 8
Length without valve, in: 26.21
Empty weight, lbs (w/o valve): 40.86
Buoyancy Empty, lbs (w/valve): 3.11
Buoyancy Full, lbs (w/valve): -4.34

*Empty weights do not include valves, which would add 1.5 - 2.5 lbs, but buoyancy figures do.

fireman mike
07-10-2007, 12:43
Yes I have a love hate with mine 100's too. I am saving to buy steel 119 that way I have more air and can lose some weight. Ps

medic001918
07-10-2007, 12:49
Like many people, I'm partial to steel tanks. My fiance dives steel HP100's which works out well for her. The size is similar to an AL80, but she gets the added weight savings (from her belt) that she has to carry. And it will be far more beneficial when she gets her drysuit. Myself, I dive a LP95, or LP108's. Both pretty large, heavy steel tanks. But they allow me to dive my SS bp/w & a drysuit without having to carry any additional weight. Everyone has to look at where they dive in determining a tank. If you dive in warm water where thick wetsuits or drysuits aren't an issue an aluminum tank can be the best choice for you.
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<DIV>To the OP, I'm glad that you found a tank that you like and that works well for you. Stick with it.</DIV>
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Shane</DIV>

JahJahwarrior
07-10-2007, 13:16
Please let me reiterate that I do believe steel tanks are better almost all around. They let you shuck weight on your weight belt, are often smaller than Aluminum tanks, LP tanks can be filled anywhere that fills normal tanks, and can sometimes be safely overfilledjust a tad to give you more air, but that's really a tech/cave thing :) They last for forever if cared for, and have better bouyancy characteristics. But, they are also very expensive! So if you have the money, I would probably never advise that you buy aluminum tanks. I have found a tank that works for me, yes, but you know what? 80's would work. Steel hp80s too, or LP95, 98's, 105, 108's, all of those could work too. :) Infact, I'd rather be diving LP95's.

My only purpose in writing about these tanks was to "review" them in some way. I figured maybe someone out there wanted to know why they should or shouldn't by aluminum 100's. I also talked about finish, because that applies to all aluminum tanks.

And if I went with steel, I would go with low pressure tanks. For one, a high pressure tank has the same problems I'm running into: the shop doesn't even look half the time, and gives me a fill to 3k. Infact, one of my buddy's tanks is two months out of vip, and he keeps getting them filled, no shop has noticed yet. :) (no clue why he got them vipped at seperate times) A low pressure tank can also be overfilled, the safety of that is a can of worms that I don't want toopen, but it happens, and rarely does it result in catastrophe. I'm in Cave Country, which is why occasionally when the right guy is at the shop, I'll get a fill to 3600. (this gives me more like 110 cu. ft. I believe, maybe 115.) And, I can handle the weight, even if it means I might have to actually (gasp!) work out a little....

mwhities
07-10-2007, 13:25
I dive with Catalina AL100s. Only about 4 or 5 dives with them but, I trim out well and they help me last as long as my dive buddy with an al80. :)

Michael

cummings66
07-10-2007, 19:31
And if I went with steel, I would go with low pressure tanks. For one, a high pressure tank has the same problems I'm running into:

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<DIV>The largest advantage to a steel HP100 is the fact that its much lighter than your tank for example. If a person wants a lightweight tank that's steel then the HP is what you get, if you want full consistant fills then get the LP tank.</DIV>
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<DIV>Never buy any tank thinking you can get it overfilled, and you did open that can by making an inferance that in cave country it happens all the time. That doesn't mean it's safe to do it all the time, I know it's common however and I don't really agree with it.</DIV>
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<DIV>Compare empty weights of HP and LP tanks and you'll see why many like Hp tanks even though getting full fills are dodgy in many areas. I know of a small handful of shops that can even do it consistantly, most can not.</DIV>

somewhereinla
07-11-2007, 10:06
I have the same problem, what you need to do is insist on getting your fill to the 3442 (in my case) mark. Very often the problem is they don't let the tank cool long enough for the air to compress again. Ask them to take their time or bring your tank the day before.

cummings66
07-11-2007, 12:57
Even that won't always work. Ask them to check it before you walk out the door and to top it off if needed. Plan on waiting around an hour if you want a good full fill.
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<DIV>There are some shops I frequent that simply can not fill them no matter what because their compressor will not put out that pressure.</DIV>

CompuDude
07-11-2007, 19:49
JahJah- Have you considered buying used steel tanks? Those 3AA steel tanks just last forever, even with the overfills they get. And when you buy used, you're talking about similar prices to the aluminum tanks. Something to consider.

For me, aluminum tanks have few valid uses: Pools sessions. Free tanks provided to me while on dive travels somewhere tropical. And starter doubles.

cummings66
07-11-2007, 22:25
Don't forget they do make great stage bottles.
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<DIV>I told my instructor I don't ever intend on diving with an AL tank, now here I am getting into tech and guess what the preferred stage bottles are?</DIV>

CompuDude
07-11-2007, 22:30
Don't forget they do make great stage bottles.
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<div>I told my instructor I don't ever intend on diving with an AL tank, now here I am getting into tech and guess what the preferred stage bottles are?</div>
You're absolutely right, that one should be on the list. :)

(Although I think perhaps only Al.80s, as I don't know that I can recall reading about anyone using Al.100s as stages)

FXWX
07-14-2007, 07:54
Good for you. I was using LP cylinders and the guys who sold them would overfill them. They closed, and now I can only get the "legal" amount. It is not about the ability ofanyone's compressor. Too bad for me.
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<DIV>You can get a predictable amount of air and dive with it. Have fun.</DIV>

JahJahwarrior
07-14-2007, 21:37
JahJah- Have you considered buying used steel tanks? Those 3AA steel tanks just last forever, even with the overfills they get. And when you buy used, you're talking about similar prices to the aluminum tanks. Something to consider.





Yes, I definitely considered it. Seems like usually a single used steel tank went for atleast $200, which would mean $150 more for two of the, compared to my aluminum tanks, which cost $125 each. :) Used doubles could be had for $400-$600. Of course, sometimes very good deals come along on steels too, but if they aren't local, the shipping cost often renders them a normal deal. :) Alot of great deals cna be had in southern california....the complete opposite side of the country....

cummings66
07-15-2007, 07:29
I would say so, around here steel tanks cost much more than that unless those are used prices.

CompuDude
07-15-2007, 12:21
JahJah- Have you considered buying used steel tanks? Those 3AA steel tanks just last forever, even with the overfills they get. And when you buy used, you're talking about similar prices to the aluminum tanks. Something to consider.
Yes, I definitely considered it. Seems like usually a single used steel tank went for atleast $200, which would mean $150 more for two of the, compared to my aluminum tanks, which cost $125 each. :) Used doubles could be had for $400-$600. Of course, sometimes very good deals come along on steels too, but if they aren't local, the shipping cost often renders them a normal deal. :) Alot of great deals cna be had in southern california....the complete opposite side of the country....
True, I live in SoCal so steel are quite popular... and get sold perhaps more. The question is, are the many advantages of steel worth a little extra money to you? It was for me, both weight off my belt, lighter tanks (hp100 vs. Al.80) and most importantly, longer bottom times. BT is the whole reason I do this. Anything I can do to increase BT vs. the amount of time it takes to set up and clean up, I'm for it!

cummings66
07-15-2007, 20:42
The HP100 is the perfect tank, it's similar to the AL80 and contains more air given a good fill, it's buoyancy characteristics are pretty decent. Honestly it's my favorite tank and I'd like to own at least 4 of them, I was even tempted to get rid of my HP120's and replace them with the 100 but I need the 120's for a technical course.

fire diver
07-15-2007, 22:24
True, I live in SoCal so steel are quite popular... and get sold perhaps more. The question is, are the many advantages of steel worth a little extra money to you? It was for me, both weight off my belt, lighter tanks (hp100 vs. Al.80) and most importantly, longer bottom times. BT is the whole reason I do this. Anything I can do to increase BT vs. the amount of time it takes to set up and clean up, I'm for it!

<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>That price difference may not exist for long. The cost of AL is rising pretty fast. The Dive shops I have talked to expect the price between steel and AL to be about equal in a year or two. I know the cost of AL80's have gone up ALOT since I started diving several years ago.</DIV>
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<DIV>FD</DIV>

Lucky(AR)
07-16-2007, 20:18
i tried the 100s and just for the price and the weight i really like the 80 better

cummings66
07-16-2007, 22:14
Steel 100's? I can't see much difference myself. It's only 1.6lbs heavier and gives you 20 cf more air. Of course that air weighs a bit more, but the tank itself is almost the same weight as an AL80.

CompuDude
07-16-2007, 22:17
Steel 100's? I can't see much difference myself. It's only 1.6lbs heavier and gives you 20 cf more air. Of course that air weighs a bit more, but the tank itself is almost the same weight as an AL80.
I assume he's talking about Aluminum 100s, given the thread topic. smileys/smiley1.gif

cummings66
07-16-2007, 23:52
Turns out it was a steel 100. Maybe it was a Faber, those suckers are heavy compared to everybody else.