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AggieDad
09-08-2007, 14:37
Any try one of these units out yet?
Prices on the market?

Xspect
09-08-2007, 22:05
I think I just read an ad for $1890

Soonerwink
09-08-2007, 22:12
It sounds like a nice computer from Scuba Diving Mags gear bag section. It seems a little pricey compared to new Data Mask. I think I would rather have the integrated mask though.

Advokat
09-08-2007, 22:35
It sounds like a nice computer from Scuba Diving Mags gear bag section. It seems a little pricey compared to new Data Mask. I think I would rather have the integrated mask though.

The Data Mask probably does not even have 10% of functions that Galileo is capable of performing...

AggieDad
09-09-2007, 13:49
The latest Scuba diving mag has an article about this computer and it looks very nice. I contacted my LDS and found out that at this time it is a European model only and not available in the US. This will probably change soon. MSRP is approx. 1900.
It appears to have a lot of very nice features and the electronic compass works even when tilted 90 degrees and has a memory of your heading.

Flatliner
09-09-2007, 15:14
As a self proclaimed gadget junkie, I am in LUST. Got this months Scuba Diving magazine. They have a great write up. IF I was single, or a DINK, it would already be on the credit card...

AggieDad
09-09-2007, 16:03
Me too. My LDS said that the ScubaPro rep is coming in next week and he will query them as to when the US version is going to be available and how much. I am hoping that it is not too much and won't have the problems that the Sunnto D9 had. I am always leery of being the first on the block but I could get rid of a hose and my massive compass with this thing.
I am really interested in learning about how it uses heart rates in the computer for protection against DCS.

Now if only Larry and Joe would carry it and offer it as a prize for the best thread (obviously this one :smiley2:).

ianr33
09-09-2007, 16:15
I was disappointed to see that it can only be used with 4 wireless transmitters.

I think any self respecting computer these days needs at least 10.

ianr33
09-09-2007, 16:18
I am really interested in learning about how it uses heart rates in the computer for protection against DCS.


Is there any connection between Heart Rate and DCS?

Maybe they could factor in BMI as well? Hmmm.......on second thoughts that might be a marketing disaster :smiley1:

rtrski
09-10-2007, 11:24
Looks snazzy, for sure, but I can't help but think of the "Law of Multifunction Devices"....

$2k for an air-integrated computer plus compass? Ouchies.

divingmedic
09-11-2007, 10:50
All of the married fellows must be thinking "No what would I have to do to get the wife to let my buy this thing?"

mm_dm
09-11-2007, 11:01
Looks cool, but two grand can buy alot of other gear.

CompuDude
09-11-2007, 11:41
Yeah, but... *DROOOOOL*

It's really the ultimate computer, this side of a VR3.

I want one BAD.

They're supposed to be released here in the US before the end of the year, but the ScubaPro reps aren't being more specific yet. They've been available in the UK and overseas markets for nearly a year now. There are several people who have them who have written pretty rave reviews over on ScubaBoard.

Advokat
09-11-2007, 18:33
They've been in Australia since May and I know at least three people who own them and I often go diving with them. The display is great-even I can see it from 1m away or so. The algorithm seems to be much different to my TUSA 700 and in most cases Galileo shows extra 7-9 minutes of bottom time.

Splitlip
09-11-2007, 19:28
They've been in Australia since May and I know at least three people who own them and I often go diving with them. The display is great-even I can see it from 1m away or so. The algorithm seems to be much different to my TUSA 700 and in most cases Galileo shows extra 7-9 minutes of bottom time.

The TUSA's are VERY conservative.

Splitlip
09-11-2007, 19:31
Yeah, but... *DROOOOOL*

It's really the ultimate computer, this side of a VR3.

I want one BAD.

They're supposed to be released here in the US before the end of the year, but the ScubaPro reps aren't being more specific yet. They've been available in the UK and overseas markets for nearly a year now. There are several people who have them who have written pretty rave reviews over on ScubaBoard.

I sometimes dive with a guy who somehow scored one here in SOFLA. I'll have to check it out this weekend.

Advokat
09-11-2007, 20:40
They've been in Australia since May and I know at least three people who own them and I often go diving with them. The display is great-even I can see it from 1m away or so. The algorithm seems to be much different to my TUSA 700 and in most cases Galileo shows extra 7-9 minutes of bottom time.

The TUSA's are VERY conservative.

The Nemo Wide is even more conservative...

Splitlip
09-11-2007, 21:02
They've been in Australia since May and I know at least three people who own them and I often go diving with them. The display is great-even I can see it from 1m away or so. The algorithm seems to be much different to my TUSA 700 and in most cases Galileo shows extra 7-9 minutes of bottom time.

The TUSA's are VERY conservative.

The Nemo Wide is even more conservative...

That is a good thing to know.

THT98
09-11-2007, 22:42
I just saw one today. It's pretty cool. You can tip the compass upside down, and it simply switches from north to south or whatever. It is, however a really large computer. As mentioned above, it's also almost $2K. I dive with a Smart Tec and love it. Honestly, I'm not sure I could justify spending the extra money. Like I said though, it's cool looking!

AggieDad
09-12-2007, 15:13
Just talked with my LDS and the SPRO rep had just been in the shop. He had 400 when he started his rounds and only had sixty left. He can give my shop two. I have a Smart Com now and just have to confirm what all comes with the computer. i.e. AI transmitter, heart rate monitor band etc.

Dang it...I will have to start the new budget just a little later.

AggieDad
09-14-2007, 19:43
I was just in Hong Kong and went by one of the local shops. They had a Galileo and I played with it for a while. My thoughts.
1. Very large
2. Numbers easy to see - I think I could almost read without my reader glasses uw.
3. Easy to program. My main concern was converting from metric to imperial and it was no problem.
4. Compass was easy to see and use.

All in all it looks like a great system. The best price I could get there was $1462 USD. My LDS will sell me one at a DiveMaster discount of approx. $1561.

My bank account says to wait.

andyallen69
09-17-2007, 14:46
Guys, heres a review from UK Dive magazine for your info

"The Galileo is a major move for Uwatec which faces stiff competition from Suunto. So what has it come up with? The company has chosen to go for a military-styled, oil-filled brute of a case with a user-changeable battery compartment. Gone are the irritating wet contacts of the Aladin that required the dexterity of a flute player, which have been replaced with three chunky and easy-to-use buttons - but why didn't they include a fourth? With three buttons you still have to use a long press as well as a short press, the fourth button would have done away with this hassle. Having said that, the Galileo is quite easy to get to grips with as the menu choices are displayed directly below each of the three buttons and change with each page being selected. In terms of functionality, it covers all the basics of its predecessors, including three different nitrox mixes and the ability to monitor the pressure of all of them. But it can also monitor the gas of your buddy via a wireless connection.

Uwatec has added a compass and incorporated a heart-beat monitor. So now the latest ZH-L8 ADT MB PMG algorithm can incorporate water temperature, breathing rate and a diver's heart rate into its calculation of decompression obligations. The question is, is it all a gimmick or does it work? I strapped the monitor around my chest, switched on the computer and a quick dip in the pool confirmed it was working. Although with a heartbeat reading as low as 55bpm (beats per minute), at times I was a little suspicious. Upon heading into open water the Galileo seemed to settle down, until I carried out some vigorous exercise, when it started flashing 'increased workload'. This meant that, according to the unit, my ticker was beating faster than 170 bpm. Given my current level of fitness, this seems unlikely. I would have thought it would have been closer to 140bpm. That said, when a colleague of mine used the Galileo in the field for a longer period (see Adrenalin Test on page 66), the heartbeat readings were more consistent and more in keeping with what you would expect them to be.

I compared the decompression readings with a gas-integrated Suunto Vytec DS and Delta P VR3. As far as I could tell, the Galileo was pretty similar in its calculations to the Vytec DS, irrespective of my over-exertion on one particular dive. The VR3 was less conservative - I had set a zero safety margin, so that would be expected - by a consistent margin, so no conclusions can be deduced as to whether the gas and heart-rate monitor made any difference. The tilt-compensating compass is simple to use and is displayed in large digits. It doesn't require calibrating but you do have to set where in the world you are. The display is the Galileo's strong point - the new dot matrix readout is clear while packing all the information you require into a single screen. Alternatively you can select reduced information and huge digits depending upon your preference. It's a shame that the backlight doesn't do justice to the display, and on one particularly gloomy dive I had to use my torch to illuminate the unit so that I could read it.

The Galileo computer is undoubtedly a step forward from the old Aladins, but it could have gone further. There are competing models that are easier to use and I had hoped for it to include trimix which would have really put it on the map. "

VERDICT
Large display and some unique features
Value 7/10
Performance 8/10

mwheat
01-08-2008, 10:07
They've been in Australia since May and I know at least three people who own them and I often go diving with them. The display is great-even I can see it from 1m away or so. The algorithm seems to be much different to my TUSA 700 and in most cases Galileo shows extra 7-9 minutes of bottom time.

I dive both computers also and see the same exact thing.

I've only got about 8 dives on the Galileo so far. But overall, I really like it.

Specmac
01-10-2008, 08:12
I have the Galileo Sol and here's a review I posted on another board:

Thought I'd post my first impressions of the Galileo Sol:

Display and UI are the best I've seen exception maybe being the color VR3 which I have not actually seen in person. There are 3 options for the main screen while underwater.

Display options:

Classic mode - Provides most of the information you could want at a glance and is a compromise between amount of information and readability/usability. The best option for me I leave it in this mode.

Full Mode - Displays as much information as possible on the main screen. A little too busy for me plus the characters are too small for my 50 year old eyes.

Light Mode - Minimum required information but huge characters. I refer to this as "Old Geaser Mode")

The back light is my only real complaint as I still have to put the dive light on it to read during low light or night dives.

The audible and visual alarms and alerts are the best I've seen on a dive computer. The visual alerts leave no question as to what your being notified about. For example if your exceeding the MOD, the MOD display parameter will switch from black on white to white on black and a message will appear in the center of the screen " MOD Exceeded". The audible alarm is loud enough and a pleasant sound that gets your attention without being too annoying. On my Pro Plus 2 it was a real annoying tone that seemed too load without a hood, but I often didn't hear it with a hood on. Not to mention the fact it was always a task loading and distracting activity with the Pro Plus 2 as you were often scrolling through the displays to figure out what was causing the alarm.

The digital compass is awesome and really does seem to work regardless of the tilt angle. The tilt feature and the ability to set a heading marker make this the first usable digital compass I've seen. What remains to be seen is how accurate it is as I have not had a chance to test it much in complicated navigation scenarios.

The heart monitor works well and seems to make much more sense to use for workload calculations as opposed to respiration rate. The heart monitor sensor is comfortable and after having it on for 5 minutes or so I didn't even notice it was there. The only problem I see here is there is no option to disable the heart monitor if you choose not to wear it. You can switch to respiration for workload, but it still trys to get readings from the heart monitor. I received false heart monitor readings and lost connection alerts on a dive when I was not wearing the sensor.

As for downloading dive profiles for analysis all I have to say is WOW!. You can download and graph all the data and every computer event that occurred during a dive. You can plot any of the following options against your profile: Profile/Temperature, Profile/Heart rate, Profile/Workload. In addition all alerts and alarms are also graphically plotted in the profile and you can even step through your dive profile and see what was showing on your computer display at any specific moment during the dive. You can also set bookmarks during the dive with just a touch of a button and these are also plotted in the analysis. Supposedl digital compass and heading markers data are also available, all though I haven't played with this yet.

I still wished they had used a more modern technology for the display screen. LED or TFT would have been much more readable as opposed to the age old LCD technology. But that said, it's still the best LCD display I've seen. The LCD Matrix display combined with an intuitive and easy to read UI makes this one of the best black and white LCD displays I've seen.

As for the PC software (SmarTrak) it provides much more information and analysis capability than anything I've seen. Just wish the dive equipment manufacturers would hire real software developers instead of using dive engineers to write their software. On the other hand, Dive Log has a new version out that imports and shows almost all the data from a Galileo downloaded profile. Based on this I use Dive Log as my electronic Log book as I was able to import and consolidate all my old Pro Plus 2 and new Galileo dive profiles. I still use the SmartTrak software to download and analyze individual dives and just import them into Dive Log for a consolidated electronic log book.

Also of note is the fact that the firmware is user upgradeable with downloads from the Uwatec site. The computer came with version1.2 and an update is already available. I downloaded and updated to version 1.4 which adds a new feature PDIS (Profile Dependant Intermediate Stops) or in layman terms "deep stops option". I downloaded and installed the upgrade with no problems. A trimix firmware upgrade is supposedly planned for later in 2008.

One thing I really liked about the Galileo. I didn't have to buy a separate cable or interface to download profile data to my PC. The Galileo uses an infrared interface to communicate with the PC. Most laptops already have an IR port built in so I was able to download profiles, update firmware and program the Galileo's many options from my Laptop without an additional cable. As opposed to my Pro Plus 2 which requires a $75 proprietary USB interface that is a bit finicky and can be unreliable at times. My only problem with the infrared interface was positioning and holding the Galileo in just the right position in relationship to the PC IR Port so that the laptop could detect and communicate with it. Minor problem though, as it took me all of 30 secs and a book of matches to prop it up on in order to get it positioned properly. After that it was a fast and reliable connection.

Last option of note that I'd like to point out is the ability to store your name and contact information in the Galileo so that they show up on the display when you turn it on. This is a nice feature and hopefully could help get your expensive dive computer returned if it was lost. You can also store emergency contact and medical information in the computer as well. One suggestion I would have for Uwatec is to make this information password protected as a security measure in case the computer was lost or stolen.

CompuDude
01-10-2008, 12:59
I'm jealous. That computer is definitely at the top of my wish list. But since I already have a $1.2k computer that's barely 2 years old (and still just one step from top of the line), it's hard to justify $1.8k on another!

Incidentally, making the user info password protected makes it kind of useless if the computer was lost and someone wanted to know where to return it! Ditto if the user was unconscious. Having the user and medical info on the computer is a boon for rescue personnel.

Specmac
01-10-2008, 13:18
I'm jealous. That computer is definitely at the top of my wish list. But since I already have a $1.2k computer that's barely 2 years old (and still just one step from top of the line), it's hard to justify $1.8k on another!

Incidentally, making the user info password protected makes it kind of useless if the computer was lost and someone wanted to know where to return it! Ditto if the user was unconscious. Having the user and medical info on the computer is a boon for rescue personnel.

I was referring to the need to protect updating the user information. Of course any one should be able to read it without a password.