PDA

View Full Version : keeping a camera housing from fogging up



Kidder
09-11-2007, 21:53
I have found that keeping a camera in the cooler unsealed before diving has prevented fogging. I just wipe out the condensation before going down. I tried before this to keep it clear with the defog that cam with it, but I either put to little and fogged or to much and it dried messing up my shots. Does anyone have a better way to keep it from fogging?

bversteegh
09-11-2007, 22:09
Are you having trouble fogging before or during the dive?

If before the dive - you just need to keep the housing at the same temperature/humidity as the ambient - bringing the housing from an air conditioned cabin/car to a humid bench will gaurantee fogging. Conversely - if you load and seal the housing in an air conditioned environment (also dehumidified), you'll be all right. (outside window might fog, but this will go away when you get in the water).

If you are having trouble fogging underwater, it is caused by your camera heating up - probably from using the internal flash. Put in a couple packs of dessicant before you seal your housing - and you should be set.

WestTnDiver
09-11-2007, 22:13
I've found that loading the camera in an air conditioned room helps. I never open the housing outside of my room if I can help it. I also use desiccants in the housing. The ones I like the best are about 1 inch long cylinders that change color when they are damp. They are blue when dry & pink when they need to be changed. Before a trip I put them in the oven for several hours and dry them out.

skdvr
09-11-2007, 22:24
I've found that loading the camera in an air conditioned room helps. I never open the housing outside of my room if I can help it. I also use desiccants in the housing. The ones I like the best are about 1 inch long cylinders that change color when they are damp. They are blue when dry & pink when they need to be changed. Before a trip I put them in the oven for several hours and dry them out.

cant they be put into the microwave to dry them out or is it better to put them in the oven???

Phil

Kidder
09-12-2007, 07:09
Most of my fogging problems happened at depth. I like the idea of sealing it an air conditioned enviroment. I'll also have to try the desiccants. Where is a good place to get them?

WestTnDiver
09-12-2007, 07:42
I've melted a few in the microwave so I stick to the oven on low - 125 or 150. I put them on a baking pan separated by an inch or so. I also use some of the ones that come in a little paper bag.
I googled moisture munchers and bought the ones that would fit in my housing - these are the ones that change color. They come in different sizes. Another couple of sources of the ones that don't change color are shoe stores - the ones in some of the shoe boxes fit. My pharmacist also collected an assortment from drug bottles. Most of them were too big but they were free!

wxboy911
09-12-2007, 10:43
Here is a link...

http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=SL911

Those may work for keeping the moisture out.

Phestr
09-13-2007, 07:24
The manager of my LDS said he puts SeaIce (solid defog) on the inside of the lens, and then buffs it clear. Says it works like a champ. I haven't had a problem, but I only dive warm water, and apparently my camera runs pretty cool.

CompuDude
09-13-2007, 13:05
Mine has only fogged up once, ever, so I don't usually worry about it.

But dessicants and loading your camera in the AC are the way to go if you're having issues.

Buy the good rechargeable ones (I find toaster ovens work well), don't cheap out and try to re-use the little packets that come with vitamins, shoes and various small electronics. They're usually already saturated by the time you get them, and don't recharge well.

jpep
09-16-2007, 13:42
Mine has only fogged up once, ever, so I don't usually worry about it.

But dessicants and loading your camera in the AC are the way to go if you're having issues.

Buy the good rechargeable ones (I find toaster ovens work well), don't cheap out and try to re-use the little packets that come with vitamins, shoes and various small electronics. They're usually already saturated by the time you get them, and don't recharge well.


Definitely agree with coumpudude about inserting rechargeable dessicant in the camera housing and/or strobe housing and sealing the housing in an AC'd room. I do so about an hour or so before the 1st dive, and don't have fogging issues, despite the heat that can build up in the camera/strobe housings while diving.

I also tried to nuke the reusable dessicant cartridges (that look like old the Schaefer fountain pen ink catridges... showing my age I guess:smiley13:) in a microwave... just malforms the dessicant cartridge's casing and renders them essentially unusable. Low level oven heat on a cookie tray seems to work to get the dessicant cartridges to dry out, i.e., go from pink (damp) to blue. Note that any subsequent exposure to humidity is absorbed by the cartridges... so you may wish to keep them stored in a vacuum sealed bag once recharged.

I'm new to u/w photography and have a Sealife DC 500 with the digital strobe. Not top of the line by any means, but it works for me... a diver who likes to take u/w photos of my dives... since I'm no u/w photographer.... yet. :smiley36:

Scubakraut
10-03-2007, 12:46
The cheapest method and "free" (if you are a female or with your female partner) is stuff a tampon or 2 in the housing with your camera. The tampon absorbs moisture real well.

PhD4JC
12-04-2007, 15:07
NOne of the posts that I have read mentioned putting cameras in the buckets of water (not for cleaning/rinsing goggles) that I see on my tropical dives. I guess to keep the cameras at a temperature closer to ocean water (than air temps).

TRACI
12-04-2007, 15:42
These are good suggestions, especially since I just got camera for diving, I need all the knowledge I can get! :)

CompuDude
12-04-2007, 15:53
These are good suggestions, especially since I just got camera for diving, I need all the knowledge I can get! :)

If you're diving locally, I'd say just dive without worrying about it for a little bit before tracking down exotic tools to deal with an issue you may or may not even have. I've only had my camera fog up on me twice in my life, and I've never used anything to control fogging.

Note I'm only talking about local test dives where fogging, if it happens, isn't a terrible loss. If you're traveling somewhere, by all means use something just in case, since those photos are more valuable and irreplaceable.

TRACI
12-04-2007, 16:09
My first dive will be in the ocean in January, maybe fogging will not be a issue. (hopefully)

Puffer Fish
12-04-2007, 16:21
NOne of the posts that I have read mentioned putting cameras in the buckets of water (not for cleaning/rinsing goggles) that I see on my tropical dives. I guess to keep the cameras at a temperature closer to ocean water (than air temps).
Leaving a camera in a plastic bag (ok, container) in the sun is a very bad thing to do... with a lot more concerns than just moisture inside the case..temperatures inside the case could reach more than 140 degrees, and damage both the case and the camera.... a camera bucket is your friend.

Puffer Fish
12-04-2007, 16:23
My first dive will be in the ocean in January, maybe fogging will not be a issue. (hopefully)
Make sure you open and load under air conditioning and use the air drying pouches... never had an issue, even when diving cold to hot and hot to cold.

tarheeldiver
12-10-2007, 19:16
My first dive will be in the ocean in January, maybe fogging will not be a issue. (hopefully)
Make sure you open and load under air conditioning and use the air drying pouches... never had an issue, even when diving cold to hot and hot to cold.
do you just use the little silica gel packs that come in packaging or the moisture munchers

Puffer Fish
12-10-2007, 21:25
My first dive will be in the ocean in January, maybe fogging will not be a issue. (hopefully)
Make sure you open and load under air conditioning and use the air drying pouches... never had an issue, even when diving cold to hot and hot to cold.
do you just use the little silica gel packs that come in packaging or the moisture munchers
I use moisture munchers, but any one should work...I have never had even the slightest fogging...and I get around a year on a moisture muncher (they don't go bad... I just seem to loose one a year (?))

ScubaJW
12-10-2007, 22:01
Whenever I go diving on a trip, I try to keep the silica gel packs exposed to the air to a minimum!

When I take out my camera, I hurry and close the housing with the silicia gels inside it to keep it dry. Ambient air has plenty of moisture and it renders those useless.

Zeagle Eagle
07-08-2011, 12:45
I've melted a few in the microwave so I stick to the oven on low - 125 or 150. I put them on a baking pan separated by an inch or so. I also use some of the ones that come in a little paper bag.
I googled moisture munchers and bought the ones that would fit in my housing - these are the ones that change color. They come in different sizes. Another couple of sources of the ones that don't change color are shoe stores - the ones in some of the shoe boxes fit. My pharmacist also collected an assortment from drug bottles. Most of them were too big but they were free!

I know this is an old thread; but, I had camera lens fogging problems in COZ last week. After I got home I pulled out my moisture munchers and some assorted packets from purchases. The munchers were pink so I put them on a cookie tin and put all of them in the oven for 2 hours at 170 degrees. Now they are all bright blue and recharged. I keep them in a vacuum sealed plastic box. Maybe next time I will remember to bring them.

Any recommendations on how many to put in an ikelite housing Ikelite Housing for JVC Digital Video Cameras (http://www.ikelite.com/web_two/jvc_hd300.html) and any ideas on how to attach them?

Do they sell moisture muncher holders?

Does it make any difference how close to the lens they are?

Cheddarchick
07-08-2011, 13:30
I keep my packets in a tupperware with Damp rid in it. Keeps them dry as a bone & recharges them.....

Zeagle Eagle
07-08-2011, 14:39
I keep my packets in a tupperware with Damp rid in it. Keeps them dry as a bone & recharges them.....

Excellent idea CC. I think I will add a damp rid if it will fit in my vacuum container.

Looks like the sell it at walmart in refill packets.
Walmart.com: FG90 DampRid Easy Fill Large Room Moisture Absorber with Pouch: Household Essentials (http://www.walmart.com/ip/FG90-DampRid-Easy-Fill-Large-Room-Moisture-Absorber-with-Pouch/15033117?sourceid=1500000000000007346530&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=15033117)

Cheddarchick
07-08-2011, 18:40
Works like a charm..

DevilDiver
07-08-2011, 19:32
You can always use this trick.... they are absorbent as hell. (ooop's I meant well)

http://forum.scubatoys.com/techniques-43/sanitary-pads-your-housing-27248/

Zeagle Eagle
07-08-2011, 23:08
You can always use this trick.... they are absorbent as hell. (ooop's I meant well)

http://forum.scubatoys.com/techniques-43/sanitary-pads-your-housing-27248/

Wife says they only absorb moisture that they actually touch.