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Mediterranean_diver
09-12-2007, 13:05
I hate to be a negative vibe in the forum with all of you cool divers but I must tell you about the malfunction with my new equipment bought from scuba toys.

In July I bought the regulator package deal (Mares R2 Rebel Package) and when it arrived I went diving in the Bay of NaplesItaly to check it out. When I was at roughly 12 meters to my surprise I heard a blow out and a sudden gush of air escaping my tank. My air pressure gauge had blown out and I was losing air fast. Thankfully my dive buddy was close and he shared his air and turned off my air. He then went back down again and found the little pin inside the gauge and I put it back together again. The problem was because the end of the high pressure hose leading into the air gauge was not tightened. This caused it to blow out when I was diving. Thankfully I am alive and this is just some helpful advise.

When you receive new equipment that was checked and tested, check it again.

Hopefully Scuba toys can make this right?????

Otherwise I must say that I am very happy with this package and just the other day I was down at 41 meters without any problems with this gear.

Charlotte Smith
09-12-2007, 13:13
I ALWAYS check to see if my hoses are tight among many other things before a dive....no matter who has checked it out.

Bigg_Budd
09-12-2007, 13:16
I ALWAYS check to see if my hoses are tight among many other things before a dive....no matter who has checked it out.

Amen Sister. Especially new gear.

Zenagirl
09-12-2007, 13:20
Unfortunately, I had the same thing happen with my primary reg after ST serviced it last April. Was scary, but we managed the emergency.

I called and spoke with Joe and he made it right for me. Regardless, checking hoses for tightness is part of my pre-dive checklist now!

TxScubaBear
09-12-2007, 13:32
At AOW dive camp this past weekend, a couple of the guys there mentioned they check their hoses before each and every dive, that in itself was a valuable lesson.

ScubaToys Larry
09-12-2007, 13:45
Wow... Ok, I'm a little confused by all this... so help me out here. I never heard of this happening before... This happened to you in July? Did you contact us then? And if I'm to understand what happened, the gauge unscrewed itself from the hose and blew off? And the HP spool blew out? And it was draining the tank fast??

Just trying to figure out what happened - what could have caused it.

I know it's possible to have a brand new seat in a reg go bad.. and a reg free flow - but I've never heard of a gauge coming off...

Here's a picture of a different gauge when disassembled:

http://www.scubatoys.com/store/joelarry/pics/hpspoolparts.jpg

I assume yours was an Aeris in a Boot? 2 Gauge??

Shoot me a PM if you could with your name and info so I can look up the serial numbers on your units - or post out here so I can figure it out!

Thanks!

Mediterranean_diver
09-12-2007, 13:53
Larry,

Thanks for the picture, the little pin inside the air gauge as shown in the picture blew out when the end of the hose came apart. The threads were loose and when I turn the pressure gauge (that has a swivel) it blew out and came unscrewed. Hope this helps.

ScubaToys Larry
09-12-2007, 13:58
Larry,

Thanks for the picture, the little pin inside the air gauge as shown in the picture blew out when the end of the hose came apart. The threads were loose and when I turn the pressure gauge (that has a swivel) it blew out and came unscrewed. Hope this helps.


Cool... was it an aeris gauge?? Can you PM me your info so I can look up the models and makes??

Mediterranean_diver
10-11-2007, 09:40
Larry,

The model is acually called tulsa and it was attached to the octopus with the serial number RI13436. Hope this is the info you need!!

comet24
10-11-2007, 09:51
Glad your buddy and you handled the emergency well. When ever you get a new piece of gear or one back from being serviced you should check to make sure everything is tight. I also check my gear after a flight before my first dive of that trip. I found my primary second stage was loose after a flight. Not sure if the flight had anything to do with it. But just a quick check saved me problems. I also keep an adjustable wrench and allen keys in my bag.

BobArnold8265
10-11-2007, 09:59
I've had a couple of issues in the past with gear that was just serviced from my LDS. I've had two occassions where my reg wasn't properly serviced and leaked. I think with all new gear or recently serviced gear, it's always wise to hook it up to a tank and check it out before actually using it. People make mistakes and it's best to make sure you double check your "life support" gear yourself !!

DougNR
10-11-2007, 11:23
In this case it's the connection to the guage itself that blew out!?!
That really seems strange! When most of us do pre-dive checks, I'd bet most would verify the threads at the 1st stage without giving much thought to the HP hose / guage connection.

I obviously can't speak for what ST's checklist calls for when assembling a new package rig, but I'm not sure I would have expectations that covers and or collars would be removed to verify the integrity of that particular fitting. Not many current guages have simple access to that joint (I believe).

Guess I'm gonna hafta re-examine my personal checklist as well!!

DZorn00
10-11-2007, 11:29
People make mistakes and it's best to make sure you double check your "life support" gear yourself !!
Amen to that, we all make mistake especially if we are rushed in any form. Being a former Marine and always checking and rechecking, I tend to do that a lot a t home and with my hobbies. Drives the wife and kids crazy but hey, better safe than sorry right?

JahJahwarrior
10-11-2007, 19:18
OP--you might want to replace your guage. It's probably not good if water gets in there.


As for stuff coming back from service in a not-functioning shape, I had my first reg set come back freeflowing a tiny bit, and it seemed to be getting worse. Got another shop to test it out for $20, and they reported it was fine. Next dive, I had to actually call it before I got below, as I could not get the second stage to stop freeflowing to save my life. This has led me to believe that I am probably safer never letting anyone but myself work on my gear.

TxScubaBear
10-12-2007, 06:17
This thread brings home the trueness of how safe it can be diving with a buddy all the time.....

cgvmer
10-12-2007, 06:49
The good part of this is that you and your buddy reacted quickly and ended the dive safely. Given the mechanical nature of these devices we all need to do a pre-dive check. I know most of my gear was rental until recently and I always had to check it because of the abuse rental gear takes (I have returned broken regs and leaking bcd's), so know I own, and realize I have to do the same checks with my own gear.
Lesson learned.

fyrediver
10-24-2007, 22:33
Several of us Military guy's down here bought a real nice package from ST.Mine came in a week later, as I ordered a few days behind them. My low psi line was connected to the BC, but was never connected to the regulator set. One of our guy's came here as a master diver. With that, I trusted him to know where to connect the line to the reg. He tested the whole system with soapy water after the connection was made. He also matched it with the set up of the other reg sets for accuracy. I was so confident of the fix, that we went to 130ft. on the reef, with no issues. We got a real good deal otherwise on the systems. That and more, is why I HATE it when guys like us, new divers want to throw the stuff on and jump right in. I like to look at my stuff in a calm, orderly fashion. Lastly, we had rental gear here malfunction when we dove the producer, a wreck at 100ft. in swift current. Haste makes waste. When your building something, or buddy checking.

ianr33
10-25-2007, 06:47
You should not lose air "fast" if a high pressure hose ruptures (or if the s.p.g. falls off) . The air will be coming out of a pinhole size orifice in the reg (at least in modern regs) Will take around 20 MINUTES to empty a tank,although I am sure it will look very dramatic.

Losing a low pressure hose is a different story though,a tank can empty in a couple of minutes or so.
The Deco Stop (http://thedecostop.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5296)

This post illustrates a good reason not to have the s.p.g. in a boot.Much harder to check the connection or see a small leak .

Zenagirl
10-25-2007, 13:11
I can tell you that when the hose disconnected from my second stage, it took no more than 2 minutes for the tank to empty from 900psi to 10psi. And yes, it was pretty spectacular to see the hose whipping around and the huge blast of bubbles above my head.

mm2002
10-25-2007, 13:56
I can tell you that when the hose disconnected from my second stage, it took no more than 2 minutes for the tank to empty from 900psi to 10psi. And yes, it was pretty spectacular to see the hose whipping around and the huge blast of bubbles above my head.

I can imagine that would definitely get your attention! :icon_eek:
I suddenly have the desire to go take our stuff apart and check it out.

mitsuguy
10-25-2007, 14:35
what I wanna know from the OP is how in the world did his buddy ever find that itty bitty little pin... I'd imagine even in a pool, it would be next to impossible to find....

Zenagirl
10-25-2007, 18:37
I can imagine that would definitely get your attention! :icon_eek:
I suddenly have the desire to go take our stuff apart and check it out.

The nice thing is that you don't have to take anything apart, you just have to make sure that the hose is tightened down on the reg. That's now part of my pre-dive check on each and every dive. ;)

cyclone
10-25-2007, 19:16
Sometimes upon checking out our equipment bought to a decent dealer also takes a little bit of precautions. Sometimes it's the way we handle it too, puts a lot of stress to the hoses and such. I always babied mine. I am good with technical stuff and always try and check for wobbles and loose stuff and better not to dive if your not sure about the conditions. These equipments are replaceable and your life is not. :smiley20:

mm2002
10-25-2007, 19:25
I can imagine that would definitely get your attention! :icon_eek:
I suddenly have the desire to go take our stuff apart and check it out.

The nice thing is that you don't have to take anything apart, you just have to make sure that the hose is tightened down on the reg. That's now part of my pre-dive check on each and every dive. ;)

True, but I was thinking about removing the SPG from the console, and checking the hose fitting. I suppose that's not really "taking it apart" though. :smiley29:

UCFKnightDiver
10-25-2007, 23:11
scary

hychang
10-26-2007, 10:21
Thanks OP for sharing your story. Like the others here, there's another item on me pre and post dive checklist. I'm glad that you and your buddy handled it so well.


what I wanna know from the OP is how in the world did his buddy ever find that itty bitty little pin... I'd imagine even in a pool, it would be next to impossible to find....

cummings66
10-29-2007, 20:06
I can tell you that when the hose disconnected from my second stage,

Yup, losing that would be a fast way to no air. Losing the gage on an HP hose should take a long time as ian33 showed in the posting. I read that a long time back and was amazed. Many people thought a HP hose would lose air fast and the LP would take a long time, it was the opposite.

Puffer Fish
10-30-2007, 20:14
I can tell you that when the hose disconnected from my second stage,

Yup, losing that would be a fast way to no air. Losing the gage on an HP hose should take a long time as ian33 showed in the posting. I read that a long time back and was amazed. Many people thought a HP hose would lose air fast and the LP would take a long time, it was the opposite.

I thing "long time" is somewhat understating the issue... but it sure is better than the LP side.

lucidblue
10-30-2007, 20:30
Something to add to my pre-dive checklist...

bubble-head
10-30-2007, 20:52
Thanks for your post. I'm going to be re-checking my HP hose (and others) for tightness since it's been a while. Glad to hear your buddy and you made it through the experience ok.

Zenagirl
10-31-2007, 07:49
Thanks! I think it's just one of those things that isn't taught and overlooked for pre-trip checks at least. I will now check all my hose connections prior to trips, and especially after service, but also check after I've arrived at my destination before I dive the first time. A little too vigilant? Yeah, but at this point it makes me feel better.

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
10-31-2007, 11:43
I know of someone who thought his HP hose was defective because of the tiny orifice. Instead of complaining he thought he'd do a good deed and drilled it out with a dremel tool. He connected his SPG and when he pressurized the system the SPG shot across the room and hit the wall. Important rule: pressure times area is force. Lucky he wasn't hurt by his home-made cannon.

kenmendes
10-31-2007, 11:52
Thanks for the info and that your buddy was close enough to handle the emergency. Well i guess you learned a new pre dive check. Never trust anyone but yourself. Its your life not theirs.

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 17:57
Thanks! I think it's just one of those things that isn't taught and overlooked for pre-trip checks at least. I will now check all my hose connections prior to trips, and especially after service, but also check after I've arrived at my destination before I dive the first time. A little too vigilant? Yeah, but at this point it makes me feel better.
We used to teach that as part of the normal OW class, but that and a lot of other stuff is no longer covered.

You are doing good...the object is to be comfortable, and that means knowing all the little things are taken care of.

Oddly, I have always check hoses on every trip.. is second nature to me.. but I never checked tank knobs... that was until I had one come off on a boat and some of the parts roll off the end of the boat....I now check them also.