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bigman241
12-18-2010, 18:13
One of the ideas my dad is obsessing over is buying a boat to run around and dive from.

We had been running around the idea, mainly a joke, until we saw a older 31 foot trojan at a local pawn shop CHEAP. I guess the owner though he would pull it to lake cumberland, then back home at the end of the year:smilie39: ohhh a 300 miles trip.

In fact he is showing our house tonight in hopes of selling it and buying a nice boat. :smiley20:

Being the sound, reasonable, cautious person I am:smiley9:, I have concerns, but nothing a course, and some wheel time with a seasoned boat owner would not fix.

I got one question, to run a boat out to say the reefs, or god help us dad's idea of running to the bahama's :smiley5: don't you need a captain license to do so.

From what I and he read the boat would be ok for long hauls say out to the reefs and maybe the bahama's not sure I want to make that trip

Vercingetorix
12-18-2010, 18:33
I got one question, to run a boat out to say the reefs, or god help us dad's idea of running to the bahama's :smiley5: don't you need a captain license to do so.


No. You're not joining the Merchant Marine. It's a pleasure craft. Any idiot can own and run a pleasure craft; unfortunately, mnany untrained idiots do.

scubagirlj
12-18-2010, 18:41
big- there seems to be a rule in SOFL-if it floats, flys or fornicates, rent it

bigman241
12-18-2010, 18:45
I like that one
big- there seems to be a rule in SOFL-if it floats, flys or fornicates, rent it

bigman241
12-18-2010, 18:46
if he did buy the boat, we would get some training, not looking to drown, HEY IT WAS NOT MY IDEA, I JUST GET TO BE THE ONE TO MAKE SURE IT IS SAFE AND LEGAL.

NOT like any thing could happen running 150+ miles off the coast in open :smiley5::smiley13::smiley11::smiley11:water

I have seen the effects of untrained idiots on small and big inland lakes, watched a guy run over and smash my dad's foot on a jet ski, cause he though letting go of the throttle meant stop, and we pulled a guy into a dock on cumberland(ky) who ran down a channel 5 miles till he hit 1/4 tank and I guess thought the trip back would be only a mile. :smiley29:
No. You're not joining the Merchant Marine. It's a pleasure craft. Any idiot can own and run a pleasure craft; unfortunately, mnany untrained idiots do.

Splitlip
12-18-2010, 18:46
LOL. Sadly, in Florida you need nothing to operate a boat. Maybe now you have to be 14 yrs old.

I've done it from palm beach in a 37 ft Bertram, 35 or 36 ft Trojan, a 24 ft Aquasport CC, a 23 ft Thunderbird IO (leaving a bar in Boynton at last call), my own 23 ft Mako CC and a (ahem) 19 ft Chris Craft tender (but I was 22 and invincible) with nothing but a CB and a compass. On that trip we hung around the Sailfish Marina until we found somebody with "LORAN" to follow. (pre GPS) But followed 270 home solo.

Have a friend who did it on his 16th birthday in 16 ft ski boat.
Warning. Do not attempt this without the proper vessel and training. Chuck Muir was lost an his 61 footer.

Splitlip
12-18-2010, 18:56
Tim:

If you do plan on a boat, I highly recommend taking training with the Coast Guard Auxiliary or one of the other agencies. If nothing else, lake guys learn to dock when there is current. You'll also learn how to navigate using channel markers and dead reckoning.

I don't know your seamanship history, but when I boated in Indiana, I could see landmarks on all points of the compass.

Granted today, there is such a thing as GPS but...you still learned your tables even though you dive a computer.

bigman241
12-18-2010, 20:46
agreed, I have seen folks get in trouble when they can dock the fishing boat in a tiny lake and try to dock a big speed boat on a big lake in waves. Been around boats all my left, but my ocean experience is I have been on a dive boat diving, thats IT. A course will be a must
Tim:

If you do plan on a boat, I highly recommend taking training with the Coast Guard Auxiliary or one of the other agencies. If nothing else, lake guys learn to dock when there is current. You'll also learn how to navigate using channel markers and dead reckoning.

I don't know your seamanship history, but when I boated in Indiana, I could see landmarks on all points of the compass.

Granted today, there is such a thing as GPS but...you still learned your tables even though you dive a computer.

Splitlip
12-18-2010, 21:02
Here.

USCGAUX Boating Safety Education - United States Coast Guard Auxiliary (http://www.cgaux.org/boatinged/)

scubastud
12-18-2010, 23:35
big- there seems to be a rule in SOFL-if it floats, flys or fornicates, rent it

Fornica....

Prostitution is legal in Florida?

bigman241
12-19-2010, 00:02
guess depends on how you look at it, some might see a day at the local strip club as fornication. LOL
Fornica....

Prostitution is legal in Florida?

WaScubaDude
12-19-2010, 00:15
guess depends on how you look at it, some might see a day at the local strip club as fornication. LOL

No Bigman, there is No Sex in the Champagne Room!

inventor
12-19-2010, 00:28
No Bigman, there is No Sex in the Champagne Room!

YouTube - Chris Rock - No Sex in the Champagne Room *Unsensored* (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSLeUTpwFjI)

bigman241
12-19-2010, 00:37
your a funny funny man buddy, HEck your in vegas, not to far to the bunny ranch. LOL

I did not mean that you would get laid in a strip club, I know some you can, just to alot of folks, having a 3/4 naked girl dancing on your lap, is fornacating. Heck I know a few folks who think looking at woman with that guy mind, is fornacating.
YouTube - Chris Rock - No Sex in the Champagne Room *Unsensored* (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSLeUTpwFjI)

scubastud
12-19-2010, 06:50
ahhhh you live in the bible belt.

bigman241
12-19-2010, 08:21
pretty much, not that thats a bad thing. I am noticing there is not much of a bible belt left these days.
ahhhh you live in the bible belt.

Splitlip
12-19-2010, 11:18
ahhhh you live in the bible belt.

3/4 naked. LOL I guess so.

scubastud
12-19-2010, 11:45
3/4 naked. LOL I guess so.

:smilie39::smilie39::smilie39:

Jack Hammer
12-19-2010, 13:03
Biggie - Having dove quite a bit off small boats here's a few tips.

Make sure the radio works and everybody on board knows how to use it.

At least one person has to stay on the boat at all times - at all times. Either rotate diving in pairs or bring someone to hang out up top.

Never ever leave the boat unattended on the surface. There are too many times when people have gone swimming and the current has pulled them away from the boat.

Make sure that everyone knows how to start the motor and operate the boat.

Have a GPS and make sure everybody knows how to read the coordinates in case they need to relay them over the radio.

Make sure each diver has a SMB.

Have an agreed upon plan so the person on the boat knows when you should return and at what point to be concerned.

Have binoculars on the boat. They come in extremely handy for many purposes.

Have O2 on the boat.

Make sure everyone knows where the closest recompression chamber is.

Know what flags to fly and how to display them. In some areas you can get a ticket for diving without the proper dive flag(s) displayed.

Have ~50' or more of line attached to a float behind the boat while you are diving. I can't stress how many times these lines have allowed me to get to the boat and not get carried away by current.

Be vigilant about checking the weather the day before, the morning before, and immediately before you leave. We didn't check once immediately before leaving and got caught with divers in the water when a violent storm rolled over and within a few minutes we went from calm glassy water to sideways rain and big waves.

Davetowz
12-20-2010, 17:50
Fornica....

Prostitution is legal in Florida?
If you speak the language!! LOL

bigman241
12-20-2010, 18:07
very very good list, was mentally going through it. Even with only 5 ocean dives under mt belt, I thought about the line behind the boat, was wondering if just having it out was over kill glad to hear someone say it was a good thing to do. Buy or rent I am sure we will be doing some boat dives on our own. I was planning a big deep sea fishing trip, but found a good boat rental for a price that would allow for a 3 day rental VS 8 hours of fishing. Mom seem to think 3 days on our own, being able to check stuff out was more fun then a one day trip on a fish charter.

SO you list will come in handy. I am going to copy paste it to be safe. I have an smg, but do not like the setup, I am going to get me one I want and let dad have the one I have now, he was going to buy the same one and said he liked it, I saw no reason to end up with 3.

My big concern is leaving mom on board alone, will have to get out on the water and give her some time and teach her a few things before going down, I also plan on a big print float to pull with us, that way who ever us on the surface will know where we are.
Biggie - Having dove quite a bit off small boats here's a few tips.

Make sure the radio works and everybody on board knows how to use it.

At least one person has to stay on the boat at all times - at all times. Either rotate diving in pairs or bring someone to hang out up top.

Never ever leave the boat unattended on the surface. There are too many times when people have gone swimming and the current has pulled them away from the boat.

Make sure that everyone knows how to start the motor and operate the boat.

Have a GPS and make sure everybody knows how to read the coordinates in case they need to relay them over the radio.

Make sure each diver has a SMB.

Have an agreed upon plan so the person on the boat knows when you should return and at what point to be concerned.

Have binoculars on the boat. They come in extremely handy for many purposes.

Have O2 on the boat.

Make sure everyone knows where the closest recompression chamber is.

Know what flags to fly and how to display them. In some areas you can get a ticket for diving without the proper dive flag(s) displayed.

Have ~50' or more of line attached to a float behind the boat while you are diving. I can't stress how many times these lines have allowed me to get to the boat and not get carried away by current.

Be vigilant about checking the weather the day before, the morning before, and immediately before you leave. We didn't check once immediately before leaving and got caught with divers in the water when a violent storm rolled over and within a few minutes we went from calm glassy water to sideways rain and big waves.

Beefcake
12-21-2010, 00:06
You really get to move to Key Largo? I'm extremely jealous.

If you're serious about the boat at the pawn shop, I'd start by having it surveyed. There are a million boats for sale in Florida, and there are some great deals, but it is well worth a few hundred bucks to know what you're getting.

Running a boat on the ocean takes more preparation than on a lake. I don't know about the Atlantic, but Pooh happens quick out here on the left coast. Splitlip's idea of a USCG-Aux class is a good start. The basic class, Boating Skills and Seamanship, is decent, but I would recommend their coastal navigation class as well. It's easy to rely on GPS technology, but saltwater can cause electronics to fail, and it's nice to know how to get home.

All of your past boating experience will help, but the ocean takes a really self-reliant mindset. Just like in diving, the boy scout motto "Be Prepared" will serve you well on the ocean. For instance, on one of my last trips, a mechanical problem kept my boat from planing, so I burned nearly twice as much fuel as expected. Luckily, I planned for the worst and took 35 gallons extra in Jerry-cans, so we didn't have to make the dreaded call to the coast guard.
http://i1027.photobucket.com/albums/y334/In2DeepScuba/DSCF3491.jpg
Edit: Sorry, I've been sitting here dreaming of warm enough weather to get out on the ocean, so I thought I'd throw out a photo of my little commercial troller. The ocean won't lay down here for several months, and the albacore won't be back in range until the last week of June. I guess it's time for some cold water diving until the salmon show up in the spring... Did I mention that I'm jealous of your move?

bigman241
12-21-2010, 07:52
thats a nice little boat, are you the one on the right or left?
You really get to move to Key Largo? I'm extremely jealous.

If you're serious about the boat at the pawn shop, I'd start by having it surveyed. There are a million boats for sale in Florida, and there are some great deals, but it is well worth a few hundred bucks to know what you're getting.

Running a boat on the ocean takes more preparation than on a lake. I don't know about the Atlantic, but Pooh happens quick out here on the left coast. Splitlip's idea of a USCG-Aux class is a good start. The basic class, Boating Skills and Seamanship, is decent, but I would recommend their coastal navigation class as well. It's easy to rely on GPS technology, but saltwater can cause electronics to fail, and it's nice to know how to get home.

All of your past boating experience will help, but the ocean takes a really self-reliant mindset. Just like in diving, the boy scout motto "Be Prepared" will serve you well on the ocean. For instance, on one of my last trips, a mechanical problem kept my boat from planing, so I burned nearly twice as much fuel as expected. Luckily, I planned for the worst and took 35 gallons extra in Jerry-cans, so we didn't have to make the dreaded call to the coast guard.
http://i1027.photobucket.com/albums/y334/In2DeepScuba/DSCF3491.jpg
Edit: Sorry, I've been sitting here dreaming of warm enough weather to get out on the ocean, so I thought I'd throw out a photo of my little commercial troller. The ocean won't lay down here for several months, and the albacore won't be back in range until the last week of June. I guess it's time for some cold water diving until the salmon show up in the spring... Did I mention that I'm jealous of your move?

navyhmc
12-21-2010, 08:57
You really get to move to Key Largo? I'm extremely jealous.

If you're serious about the boat at the pawn shop, I'd start by having it surveyed. There are a million boats for sale in Florida, and there are some great deals, but it is well worth a few hundred bucks to know what you're getting.

Running a boat on the ocean takes more preparation than on a lake. I don't know about the Atlantic, but Pooh happens quick out here on the left coast. Splitlip's idea of a USCG-Aux class is a good start. The basic class, Boating Skills and Seamanship, is decent, but I would recommend their coastal navigation class as well. It's easy to rely on GPS technology, but saltwater can cause electronics to fail, and it's nice to know how to get home.

All of your past boating experience will help, but the ocean takes a really self-reliant mindset. Just like in diving, the boy scout motto "Be Prepared" will serve you well on the ocean. For instance, on one of my last trips, a mechanical problem kept my boat from planing, so I burned nearly twice as much fuel as expected. Luckily, I planned for the worst and took 35 gallons extra in Jerry-cans, so we didn't have to make the dreaded call to the coast guard.
http://i1027.photobucket.com/albums/y334/In2DeepScuba/DSCF3491.jpg
Edit: Sorry, I've been sitting here dreaming of warm enough weather to get out on the ocean, so I thought I'd throw out a photo of my little commercial troller. The ocean won't lay down here for several months, and the albacore won't be back in range until the last week of June. I guess it's time for some cold water diving until the salmon show up in the spring... Did I mention that I'm jealous of your move?

Juust sit right back and you'll hear a tale
A tale of Beefcake''s trip
That started from this chilly port
aboard this tiny ship....

Sorry Beef, it just came out, couldn't help myself.

Beefcake
12-21-2010, 13:19
thats a nice little boat, are you the one on the right or left?

I'm the one with sun reflecting off my fivehead.