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View Full Version : Newbies & Refreshers-PLEASE!! do not overstate abilities & experience!!



scubagirlj
05-04-2011, 15:36
to all you divers that are dusting off your gear after an extended sabbatical, and for those of you newly certified, PLEASE DO NOT overstate your diving experience & ability when you go out of town/country for a dive vacation-i have had some rather annoying/harrowing/dangerous experiences with "refreshers" & "referrals", all of whom have said "i'm good" only to turn into baskets cases when encountering current/major depth- PLEASE tell the DO you are diving with EXACTLY what conditions, depths & locations you are used to diving in, its for your own good- no one needs to be a hero

Diver Kat
05-04-2011, 16:17
Smart suggestion. Even though we've lots of dive experience at this point, we usually opt/ask for an easier dive #1/day 1 on a trip, and leave the big wrecks and deeper reefs for when we've settled in and made sure all the equipment is adjusted and working correctly.

snagel
05-04-2011, 17:59
Yep, even those that are experienced divers....if you haven't dove in awhile take it easy atleast first couple dives. Gives you time to reaquaint yourself with the underworld. It's amazing to me that after not diving for the winter, the first couple dives I have to get myself back into the right frame of mind.

Speak up if your uncomfortable with any dive. I've seen some that are so easy about doing whatever dive and don't have a problem jumping in and going to 120'. Then find out that they are fresh out of open water and truly believe the DM won't put them in any sort of danger.

Snagel

Zenagirl
05-04-2011, 20:05
Agree 100% with what everyone is saying....for both newer and experienced divers!! Be honest not only for your own safety but for those around you.

buddha0724
05-05-2011, 07:28
Well I am still a newbie and when have never dove out of my area but I make sure that the guys I am diving with know how green I am. But I also have my log book with me and I have filled out for each of my dives. Anyone who wants to verify my dives can check it out.
I guess I always thought that the dive book would be a good tool for DO to use and see what their customers skills are.

Would I get strange looks walking into a DO in FLorida and handing the DM my log book and say here is my qualifications?

scubagirlj
05-05-2011, 09:26
you'd be better off handing them your c card & telling them what you tell your buddies; that you are not an experienced diver, period-anyone can sit down & fill out what ever they like in a log book, i ask to see their computer(and here's a hint...no snorkel, big clear panoramic mask +/or or colored split fins[at least no colored splits on men]...you'll get a lot more respect when diving with a new DO)

maddhadder
05-05-2011, 11:15
I have yellow/black splits, and I'm a guy, what does that mean!?!?

scubagirlj
05-05-2011, 13:32
I have yellow/black splits, and I'm a guy, what does that mean!?!?
let me guess, the rest of your gear all matches?

Noob
05-05-2011, 13:52
Great post Scubagirlj

I have black and grey splits, I also dont dive a snorkel unless I'm diving in the ocean.

PlatypusMan
05-05-2011, 18:08
I have white splits, and have been known to wear my snorkel in the ocean from time-to-time.

Also have a red weight belt, glued-on thigh pockets and a raft of still/video camera equipment that I might have with me on the boat.

Red left-side and green right-side caribiners on my D-rings round out my fashionable BP/W look.

What does that mean?

PPM

Zenagirl
05-05-2011, 18:29
You're color blind?? ;)

BRsnow
05-05-2011, 19:25
I am pretty experienced with riding in taxi's and usually pretty relaxed, but sometimes you just get a crazy driver who can make the ride far more tense than one would have thought;) BR

Lulubelle
05-05-2011, 20:58
Snorkel? What's that? We call them straws, because that is about all they are good for here.

scubastud
05-05-2011, 21:01
I'm sorry scubagirl, it won't happen again.
I thought you knew I was kidding when I told you I have more s'perience than Navy and Splitty combined.

scubagirlj
05-05-2011, 22:13
I have white splits, and have been known to wear my snorkel in the ocean from time-to-time.

Also have a red weight belt, glued-on thigh pockets and a raft of still/video camera equipment that I might have with me on the boat.

Red left-side and green right-side caribiners on my D-rings round out my fashionable BP/W look.

What does that mean?

PPM
...aside from being overly anal re the caribiners, as long as you only wear you fins between memorial day & labor day, i'd almost overlook the "split"factor...ROFLMAO

Beefcake
05-05-2011, 23:00
I agree with the main sentiment of the thread; mis-representing your skill level is dumb and dangerous. However, I find the generalizations about judging a diver by their gear to be laughable. When I was a ski instructor, I could tell a lot more about a prospective student by watching how he carried his gear from the lodge to the slopes than by what equipment he brought to the lesson.

In these internet forums, it seems that anyone that isn't DIR or Tech-oriented is assumed to be a doughball. I couldn't care less how my equipment is perceived by others; I use whatever equipment is comfortable and suits the dive at hand. This usually includes a "straw", and I will often leave my Hollis bat-fins in the truck in favor of my cheap old Oceanic Vector beginner fins because they are less likely to give me cramps on subsequent dives. So, if I showed up on your trip with my snorkel, bright blue Vector fins, my craigslist special 7mm wetsuit, and my cheap Titan regs and shiny Gekko computer just like they use in OW classes, would I be assumed to be a newbie? Or, would my BPW and the fact that I know how to put my gear together give me away?

The reason that I'm bringing this up is that I have seen guys with thousands of dollars worth of the latest and greatest fancy black gear on dive boats that look and talk like they know what they're doing and then ruin eveyone's dive by sucking air twice as fast as even the old fat guys like me. There is an old saying among fishermen that the skill of a fisherman is usually inversely proportionate to the cost of his equipment. In other words, I'd rather choose my dive buddy by how confidently he puts his kit together than by the color of his fins. In fact, one of my best dive buddies happens to wear bright yellow split fins because our visibility is generally so poor that bright colors are often helpful in keeping track of each other. I'm just sayin'....

Lulubelle
05-05-2011, 23:05
...aside from being overly anal re the caribiners, as long as you only wear you fins between memorial day & labor day, i'd almost overlook the "split"factor...ROFLMAO

That's a southern thing Judy, well done. But I wear my white fins whenever the heck I want.

scubastud
05-05-2011, 23:27
I agree with the main sentiment of the thread; mis-representing your skill level is dumb and dangerous. However, I find the generalizations about judging a diver by their gear to be laughable. When I was a ski instructor, I could tell a lot more about a prospective student by watching how he carried his gear from the lodge to the slopes than by what equipment he brought to the lesson.

In these internet forums, it seems that anyone that isn't DIR or Tech-oriented is assumed to be a doughball. I couldn't care less how my equipment is perceived by others; I use whatever equipment is comfortable and suits the dive at hand. This usually includes a "straw", and I will often leave my Hollis bat-fins in the truck in favor of my cheap old Oceanic Vector beginner fins because they are less likely to give me cramps on subsequent dives. So, if I showed up on your trip with my snorkel, bright blue Vector fins, my craigslist special 7mm wetsuit, and my cheap Titan regs and shiny Gekko computer just like they use in OW classes, would I be assumed to be a newbie? Or, would my BPW and the fact that I know how to put my gear together give me away?

The reason that I'm bringing this up is that I have seen guys with thousands of dollars worth of the latest and greatest fancy black gear on dive boats that look and talk like they know what they're doing and then ruin eveyone's dive by sucking air twice as fast as even the old fat guys like me. There is an old saying among fishermen that the skill of a fisherman is usually inversely proportionate to the cost of his equipment. In other words, I'd rather choose my dive buddy by how confidently he puts his kit together than by the color of his fins. In fact, one of my best dive buddies happens to wear bright yellow split fins because our visibility is generally so poor that bright colors are often helpful in keeping track of each other. I'm just sayin'....

:smiley32::smiley32::smiley32: :smiley20::smiley20::smiley20::smiley20: couldn't agree more Beefy! great post!! :smiley32::smiley32::smiley32::smiley20::smiley20:

WaScubaDude
05-06-2011, 11:54
to all you divers that are dusting off your gear after an extended sabbatical, and for those of you newly certified, PLEASE DO NOT overstate your diving experience & ability when you go out of town/country for a dive vacation-i have had some rather annoying/harrowing/dangerous experiences with "refreshers" & "referrals", all of whom have said "i'm good" only to turn into baskets cases when encountering current/major depth- PLEASE tell the DO you are diving with EXACTLY what conditions, depths & locations you are used to diving in, its for your own good- no one needs to be a hero

Hey Scubagirlj, Was there a specific incident that promted your post? Do you work for a dive op?
I think your advice is good. The smarter dive ops will do an easy dive first to check out how a diver actually performs. They must believe, and I do for sure, that a cert or # of claimed dives, or even the gear worn, helps little in determining a divers comfort and performance in and on the water. I personally have dove with instructors and "experienced" divers blah blah, who left little to be desired in terms of their dive skills. I have also been the "fool" who left the weight belt or fins on the boat. lol