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FishFood
07-13-2007, 18:19
Im just curious, is anyone here a Navy or USCG diver? (OR UAF or Army if there is just a thing)

techgnostic
07-15-2007, 23:39
All services include diving in their bag of tricks: CGC divers, UDTs, PJs, 21D, plus just about every special ops unit includes divers.

medictom
08-08-2007, 21:38
Yep there are diver's in every branch, but the best (I THINK) are the 003's!

paintsnow
08-08-2007, 22:11
yeah im pretty interested in becoming a navy diver as well.

anybody out there have any tips other then dive, dive, dive, and stay fit?

Kingpatzer
08-26-2007, 09:35
Military diving (navy included) is just as much about being of a military mission mind set as it is about being a diver.

Physical fitness is vitally important. Focus on stamina and endurance over raw strength. Being able to bench press your body weight is great, but being able to run for 15 miles and still have the energy to engage in some strenuous activity is better.

In the military safety is critical, and that comes from attention to detail. The inability to focus on what's important and ignore what is not is the major reason people wash out of most military training. Civilians always think they can do this well, it's the job of training to demonstrate clearly why they're wrong. The more focused you can train yourself to be the better. But no matter how good you get at it, once you're in training you'll find you can get better.

Teamwork is another huge issue in the military. There is no unit out there that needs heroes. Heroes require recovery operations and body bags. The ability to support, encourage and help your team mates is huge, and often of more value than being able to accomplish any particular skill.

The ability to get along with anyone is part of the team work thing, but is it's own skill and is necessary to success. You've never realized how many different types of personalities there are in the world until you've been in a military barracks. And you will have to live and get along with these folks for a long time. At times you will have to put your life in their hands. Being able to get along is hugely important, and is an area that most new recruits struggle with a lot.

The ability to follow one's leaders is a key component of military life, and frankly, is necessary to becoming a leader one's self. Knowing what you don't know, being able to accept as your vision a course of action you disagree with, and being able to separate your personal feelings from your professional duties are vitally important in any military career.

Perhaps the least important skill at all is diving. Frankly, you don't do it right anyway, and the military will teach you want they want you to know in this area. If you show up thinking you know how to dive, you've made yourself a trainer's dream target to demonstrate how little value civilian experience is. And the one thing you never want to be in the military is a trainer's dummy.

mcc2318
11-20-2007, 14:56
Army Scuba School is mostly reserved for special forces and rangers

kyfriedchipper
11-20-2007, 15:57
There is a thread I posted w/ the Navy Seals workout on it - may be a good starting point to see if you can make it!

navyhmc
11-20-2007, 20:03
The navy has two different dive programs. One is basically for the spec ops type with more covert type intentions and then there are the true navy divers. Think: Men of honor.

The Navy dive school is definitely a very tough school. Though there are the old salts who think it never should have left Philly.

mcc2318
11-24-2007, 23:01
last i heard the army scuba school had i think an 80% drop out rate but that was about 2 years ago

MConnelly2
12-30-2007, 21:20
Coast Guard uses the Navy Diving and Salvage Training Center in Panama City. They maintain a Liason Office there, and teach a follow-on course after the regular Navy course. (At least, to the best of my memory, last time I looked into it that was the gist of it. None of the diving billets in the Coast Guard interested me, so I put the idea out of my head.)

FishFood
12-30-2007, 21:23
Coast Guard uses the Navy Diving and Salvage Training Center in Panama City. They maintain a Liason Office there, and teach a follow-on course after the regular Navy course. (At least, to the best of my memory, last time I looked into it that was the gist of it. None of the diving billets in the Coast Guard interested me, so I put the idea out of my head.)

Yep, youd either be scraping boat hulls or freezing your arse off in Alaska :smiley21:

MLenyo
01-14-2008, 02:58
Coast Guard uses the Navy Diving and Salvage Training Center in Panama City. They maintain a Liason Office there, and teach a follow-on course after the regular Navy course. (At least, to the best of my memory, last time I looked into it that was the gist of it. None of the diving billets in the Coast Guard interested me, so I put the idea out of my head.)

Yep, youd either be scrapping boat hulls or freezing your arse off in Alaska :smiley21:

i think i'll take a pass on that!

det4220
01-14-2008, 09:10
Yep, youd either be scraping boat hulls or freezing your arse off in Alaska :smiley21:


Wow. This is easily one of the most uninformed posts I have ever seen on this forum. It might be better to make sure you know what you are talking about before you hit "Submit Reply."

navyhmc
01-14-2008, 09:17
Yep, youd either be scraping boat hulls or freezing your arse off in Alaska :smiley21:


Wow. This is easily one of the most uninformed posts I have ever seen on this forum. It might be better to make sure you know what you are talking about before you hit "Submit Reply."

You've never talked to Coastie divers, have you???? :D

det4220
01-14-2008, 10:00
It's a small community. Right now, most of the divers are in the MSST, with another group on Bouy Tenders. When the dive lockers are set up, the MSST will probably lose it's divers and their missions will go to the dive lockers.

chris in the socal
03-19-2008, 23:15
I have a friend who dives for blackwater the private military contractors.
He does alot of boat hull inspections in Iraq.

MicahEW
03-20-2008, 08:34
Im just curious, is anyone here a Navy or USCG diver? (OR UAF or Army if there is just a thing)

there are always the SEABEE's they have divers I am wanting to lookinto this thread more to see how I can possibly dive as a career too.

reeldive
03-25-2008, 19:51
Military diving (navy included) is just as much about being of a military mission mind set as it is about being a diver.

Physical fitness is vitally important. Focus on stamina and endurance over raw strength. Being able to bench press your body weight is great, but being able to run for 15 miles and still have the energy to engage in some strenuous activity is better.

In the military safety is critical, and that comes from attention to detail. The inability to focus on what's important and ignore what is not is the major reason people wash out of most military training. Civilians always think they can do this well, it's the job of training to demonstrate clearly why they're wrong. The more focused you can train yourself to be the better. But no matter how good you get at it, once you're in training you'll find you can get better.

Teamwork is another huge issue in the military. There is no unit out there that needs heroes. Heroes require recovery operations and body bags. The ability to support, encourage and help your team mates is huge, and often of more value than being able to accomplish any particular skill.

The ability to get along with anyone is part of the team work thing, but is it's own skill and is necessary to success. You've never realized how many different types of personalities there are in the world until you've been in a military barracks. And you will have to live and get along with these folks for a long time. At times you will have to put your life in their hands. Being able to get along is hugely important, and is an area that most new recruits struggle with a lot.

The ability to follow one's leaders is a key component of military life, and frankly, is necessary to becoming a leader one's self. Knowing what you don't know, being able to accept as your vision a course of action you disagree with, and being able to separate your personal feelings from your professional duties are vitally important in any military career.

Perhaps the least important skill at all is diving. Frankly, you don't do it right anyway, and the military will teach you want they want you to know in this area. If you show up thinking you know how to dive, you've made yourself a trainer's dream target to demonstrate how little value civilian experience is. And the one thing you never want to be in the military is a trainer's dummy. Thank you. I'm retired AF (Not in a dive related career field) My nephew is looking into the Navy Dive program and has asked for my advice. What you've stated here about team work, leadership. and dedication to the mission is exactly what one needs to succeed in a military career I'm going to foward this to him, if you don't mind.

Foxfyre
03-26-2008, 05:05
Hmmm. I just love how the site times out and a post is lost... LOL!

I am not sure just what you expect.
If you are expecting an experience in any way reflecting what you may have experienced in sport or even commercial diving, you will most likely not find NavSpecWar to your liking.

Combat diving rarely exceeds 30 foot of depth, and diving is but one skill among many utilized in facilitating a mission. It is not an end in itself.

Additionally, as the conditions you will be exposed to are seldom what one might desire in a recreational trip to say Cozumel, the reputation of the emphasis on an 'ironman' conditioning regimen remains fundamental to the program - simply because you will be exposed to conditions that will literally incapacitate the typical sport or commercial diver.

Having survived BUDS, if I can answer any specific questions, please PM me. But know that specwar applications will not provide an experience that is in any way reminiscent of sport diving - and little of commercial diving which is typically oriented to extended deep exposure.

On the other hand, if you happen to already benefit from exceptional conditioning (don't plan on achieving that after joining and/or applying) and you enjoy extremely adverse environmental conditions (read cold!, black water and did I mention cold!?) in the process of completing a larger mission, you just might enjoy it. :smiley2:

Have I scared you away yet? :smiley2:

scubasamurai
03-29-2008, 20:50
if you truely have any interested in "military diving" i would talk with a recruiter. most will get you in touch with the "right" people to talk with. i know most out there think i am crazy, but the they will because they need people. i lived in norfolk VA and most of the navy guys i lived next door to were divers. they were more than happy to chat and get you started in the right direction. and i agree with the above,
black water, dark water very cold and lonely water.

Shellback
03-30-2008, 21:16
Im just curious, is anyone here a Navy or USCG diver? (OR UAF or Army if there is just a thing)
FishFood, back when I was in the Navy and working as a recruiter the way it worked to become a diver went like this. The individual came in the Navy into a career field that was the source rating for a Diver and then once they finished Boot Camp and their technical training then they could apply to become a Diver. Every diver in the Navy has a primary occupation, Electrician, Hull Technician (welder), Boatswain Mate etc. I know that times have changed since I recruited in the 80s but believe that the process is probably somewhat similar to those days. Good luck if you go that route.