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View Full Version : Rechargeable pak for UK lights



Judestudio
07-13-2007, 21:59
I have a UK C8 eLED Plus light, I'm tossing between getting the rechargeable pak (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=UKBatteryRecharger) or some rechargeable C-cells instead. Anyone?

Joew
07-13-2007, 22:58
I haven't used this particular light, but I have a lot of electronic gadgets and I really like proprietary batteries. I think dealing with 8 rechargable C-cells all the time would be a PITA. It's a lot easier to just plug the charger into the battery pack. The only downside to proprietary batteries is that they are usually more expensive. But $65 for the UK nicad pack is a good deal. You might spend more than that on 8 rechargable C-cells and a charger.

Judestudio
07-13-2007, 23:46
....I think dealing with 8 rechargable C-cells all the time would be a PITA. It's a lot easier to just plug the charger into the battery pack. The only downside to proprietary batteries is that they are usually more expensive. But $65 for the UK nicad pack is a good deal. You might spend more than that on 8 rechargable C-cells and a charger.
Good points. C-cell rechargeables should be a bit cheaper, but they'll be a pain to deal with especially when traveling around. Thanks Joew.

Venio
07-13-2007, 23:58
I personally would not touch anything that is NiCd. If it's going to be a rechargeable battery it has to be NiMH for its higher capacity.

CompuDude
07-14-2007, 12:59
If the rechargeable battery pack was as good as rechargeable C's, I'd be all over it. If it could be used anywhere else (like, say, if I wanted a new dive light at some point, or wanted to use them in a toy car or something!), I'd be all over it.

But NiCad is a terrible battery technology, and I avoid proprietary battery packs whenever possible. I use rechargeable 6000 mah NiMH C cells instead. Thomas Distributing carries good ones. It's not cheaper than the UK pack, but it's FAR more versatile, and lasts longer. I get roughly 4 hours out of my UK Light Cannon with them, compared to the two hours UK advertises for their battery pack.

the gooch
07-14-2007, 14:39
CompuDude is right, stay away from the NiCd battery pack.

the gooch
07-14-2007, 19:18
I want to see what happens when LiPo becomes more mainstream.

frankc420
07-14-2007, 21:19
Make you up a battery pack, solder the batteries together and shrink wrap them, you can most likely buy any of the connectors you would need anyway. That's what we did when I was into RC racing..

niko5
07-14-2007, 21:36
Judestudio (http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/member_profile.asp?PF=5&FID=6)

<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>How do you like the UK C8 eLED? I was looking at getting one.</DIV>

guggie
07-15-2007, 18:47
I want to see what happens when LiPo becomes more mainstream.


I use Lipos in my radio control helicopters all the time. They need to be cared for and do not take deep discharging well nor over charging. They are quite flammable as well. Their discharge characteristics and power/weight ratios are not beaten though.

the gooch
07-15-2007, 20:59
Yeah, a few of my Nokia phones have had LiPo as well but the technology is not perfected. The batteries can actually be molded to any shape which could have some interesting applications.

cummings66
07-15-2007, 21:43
Why is NiCad terrible? I know it's not the most efficient but terrible? It works and I've used them in my model airplanes for a very long time.
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>I could say that there are lighter batteries out there, there are batteries with longer run times as well. But terrible, I mean it works, it's reliable, predictable and been around a long time now. They're cheaper as well.</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>If I were to pick a rechargeable battery to design something around it would probably be NiMH right now unless it needed to be very light weight in which case I'd go with the newer technology batteries.</DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>I just don't think they're terrible. To me that means unreliable and that's just not the case with NiCad's.</DIV>

CompuDude
07-15-2007, 22:14
Anything with memory effects as bad as NiCad exhibits counts as unreliable in my book. In a flashlight, do you really want a battery that can't be topped off
without drastically shortening the life of the cell? In R/C
applications, you run them down every time. That's definitely not the
case with a dive light.

I can only think of two ways NiCad's characteristics are better than NiMH: Cost is one (although the numbers are relatively close here), and the other, a more predictable power output curve, is not really relevant when using freshly charged batteries (which can be difficult given NiCad's memory effects). NiMH wins by every other meaningful measure.

guggie
07-16-2007, 08:37
No one has mentioned the environmental effects of cadmium. They definitely need to be properly disposed of, not just tossed in the garbage. NiMH need proper disposal as well, but NiCads are more toxic.

frankc420
07-16-2007, 08:42
NiCd are just junky. In my experience with them, they give off false charges, don't top off easily, generally die faster than anything else, so in turn have to be charged more than any other type. Batteries only have so many cycles, I'd rather go with Lipo or NiMH. smileys/smiley1.gif

Judestudio
07-16-2007, 17:03
Judestudio</font> (http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/member_profile.asp?PF=5&FID=6)

<div></div>
<div>How do you like the UK C8 eLED? I was looking at getting one.
I compared that with UK C4 eLED, PT Shockwave and PT Miniwave before deciding on the UK C8 eLED. Main reason is that the C8 is the only one out of all four that has a regulatory circuitry on both high and low settings. The C4 light is not regulated on the high setting if running from batteries. The PT lights are not regulated at all. The C8 gives out a nice white light, very durable, I like it a lot.

I also went for an LED light for its durability and low cost maintenance. I had my eye on the HID Cannon for a while, but then give it up after finding out how easy the light bulb breaks and that getting a new bulb costs around the same as getting a new light....
</div>

techgnostic
07-18-2007, 00:24
I want to see what happens when LiPo becomes more mainstream.
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>What'sLiPo????
</DIV>
<DIV>Sound more like a Kung Fu master.</DIV>

CompuDude
07-18-2007, 01:19
Judestudio</font> (http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/member_profile.asp?PF=5&FID=6)

<div></div>
<div>How do you like the UK C8 eLED? I was looking at getting one.
I compared that with UK C4 eLED, PT Shockwave and PT Miniwave before deciding on the UK C8 eLED. Main reason is that the C8 is the only one out of all four that has a regulatory circuitry on both high and low settings. The C4 light is not regulated on the high setting if running from batteries. The PT lights are not regulated at all. The C8 gives out a nice white light, very durable, I like it a lot.

I also went for an LED light for its durability and low cost maintenance. I had my eye on the HID Cannon for a while, but then give it up after finding out how easy the light bulb breaks and that getting a new bulb costs around the same as getting a new light....
</div>
I'm not saying it never happens, because any bulb can break, and yes they are expensive, but I have two light cannons and I do NOT treat them gingerly. No problems whatsoever. I think the fragility complaints are a bit overblown by people with bad luck who are complaining loudly on account of the cost. The Light Cannon really is one of the best lights you can get without going to a cannister.



I want to see what happens when LiPo becomes more mainstream.
<div></div>
<div>What'sLiPo????
</div>
<div>Sound more like a Kung Fu master.
Lithium Polymer. Basically Lithium-Ion, but a variety that can be molded into many shapes, and is not restricted to a form factor you can fit traditional battery cylinders into (they tend put a case around them to conceal it, but LiIon batteries usually have little cylinders under the plastic shell).
</div>

tc_rain
07-19-2007, 14:01
Does any of the batteries dim as the charge weakens or do they just go out?

CompuDude
07-19-2007, 14:08
Does any of the batteries dim as the charge weakens or do they just go out?
Alkalines and NiCad's (and lead acid, but those are only used in older can lights and scooters at this point) tend to dim as the charge gets low, but that depends on the circuitry in the light. A light with a regulated circuit will do it's best to compensate for this and give strong light throughout the life of the charge no matter what kind of batteries are in there.

tc_rain
07-19-2007, 16:32
I had an instructor once tell me that he will not use rechargable batteries because the tend to die off without warning. For me, I just figured I would charge the light before each dive. <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

CompuDude
07-19-2007, 16:44
I had an instructor once tell me that he will not use rechargable batteries because the tend to die off without warning. </span>For me, I just figured I would charge the light before each dive. </span>
Or at least before each dive day, yes. If I know I get close to 4 hrs burntime out of my batteries, I charged them overnight, and I've only been in the water with my light on for 2.5, I'm not really worried about the lights going out due to lack of power.

That instructor clearly hasn't used many regulated lights, however, because the same thing happens no matter what kind of batteries you have, there.

CompuDude
07-19-2007, 16:48
Good point. The rule of thumb is rechargables in the primary, alkalines (lithium, whatever, but non-rechargeable with a long shelf life) in the backups. Rotate the batteries in the backups out every six months even if you don't use them, and sooner, of course, if you do.

tc_rain
07-19-2007, 17:00
Maybe I misunderstood him.although, Ihad no intention of using fresh disposable batteries after each dive.

Lucky(AR)
07-22-2007, 09:35
my dive buddy bought the uk charge kit he loves it 65.00 you cant go wrong