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View Full Version : Kayak Diving, Long Island NY



Rich Keller
11-11-2011, 05:59
I have found kayak diving can get me to a lot of beach sites on Long Island that can not be reached by land. I will be adding kayak launch sites to this blog and listing locations within a 5 mile paddle from that site. If you know of any places to put in a kayak on Long Island please let me know and I will add them to the list. All GPS numbers are approximate. Some of these locations I have not been back to in years and it may no longer be legal to park or enter the water at some of these sites. In the case of the town beaches and ramps it is usually possible to get a nonresident day pass to use that location.

Huntington Harbor, West Shore Rd, N40 53 42 W073 25 30. From here you can reach all of Northport Bay, Huntington Bay out to the tip of Eatons Neck and about 3/4 of the north facing shore of Lloyds Neck. Lloyds Neck was a great place for lobster before the die off almost 10 years ago. Target Rock is at the north east side of Lloyd Neck and I have found artifacts there dating back to the late 1700s. The tip of Eatons Neck was good for lobster too as well as spear fishing.

Cold Spring Harbor, Harbor Rd, N40 52 02 W073 27 44. From here you can reach all of Cold Spring Harbor out to the north tip of Center Island and about 3/4 of the way up the west side of Lloyds Neck. You can also reach the lower part of Oyster Bay. The tip of Center Island was good for lobster.

Centerport Harbor, Coolidge Dr, N40 53 34 W073 22 28. From here you can reach all of Centerport Harbor and Northport Bay. You need to time this right though as at low tide you would be crossing a mud flat.

Northport Harbor, Scudder Beach off Woodbine Ave, N40 53 36 W073 21 25. From here you can reach all of Northport Harbor and Bay.

Ramp at LIPA power station, off Eatons Neck Rd, N40 55 25 W073 20 47. From here you can reach west to the tip of Eatons Neck and east as far as Sunken Meadow State Park. The west side of this site is good for spear fishing and lobster once you get into the rocky areas starting about half way from the ramp to the point of Eatons Neck. I have not done much diving on the east side of this site and can not tell you much about it.

Nissequoge River, Old Dock Rd, N40 54 18 W073 13 53. This is a Smithtown ramp so you will need a day pass to use this site. From here you can go west as far as Crab Meadow Beach and east as far as the mouth of Stony Brook Harbor in the Long Island Sound. You can also go up the river as far as Rt. 25 in Smithtown though I do not know of any good places to dive in the river itself it does make a good kayak day trip.

I will be adding more later but what is here so far covers the shore line from the tip of Center Island in the west to the mouth of Stony Brook Harbor in the east and all the bays and harbors that lie between.

AfterDark
11-12-2011, 00:33
I like this idea of yours, putting together a listing of launch and destination sites for kayak diving.

I've been considering buying a kayak for diving for sometime now. I own a sit inside, nice for touring and even fishing but not diving. I've been thinking a tantum sit on top kayak would give me plenty of room and a longer kayak for better stability and handling. The biggest point with a tantum is I can sell the idea to Mrs. AD as something we can also use together. She doesn't feel safe in a kayak or canoe alone but a tantum kayak would suit her fine. Do you think a tantum setup could be made to work for diving? RI is an ideal place for this because we have a consititutional right (state) to access the ocean below the high water mark and beyond. At less then high tide any beach or waterfront property is usable. Maybe a list of RI kayak sites is in the future? :)

Rich Keller
11-12-2011, 05:35
A tandem kayak is a better way to go. That is what I use for all the same reasons you mentioned and it can handle more weight. The first kayak I tried was a single that belonged to a friend and even though it was made for diving with me and all my gear it was overloaded and so it was harder to paddle and would not track properly. You would want one that was made to be used by one or two people. I know Ocean Kayak and Hobie make them and I am sure there are others. The other thing I did after trying this a few times was to set up a surface supply rig so I could leave the tank in the kayak as I dive. This makes it easier to swim and get back in the kayak when I was done.

AfterDark
11-16-2011, 23:23
A tandem kayak is a better way to go. That is what I use for all the same reasons you mentioned and it can handle more weight. The first kayak I tried was a single that belonged to a friend and even though it was made for diving with me and all my gear it was overloaded and so it was harder to paddle and would not track properly. You would want one that was made to be used by one or two people. I know Ocean Kayak and Hobie make them and I am sure there are others. The other thing I did after trying this a few times was to set up a surface supply rig so I could leave the tank in the kayak as I dive. This makes it easier to swim and get back in the kayak when I was done.


Thanks for the reply Rick. I'm glad to see I'm on the right track here. Do you use a bailout / pony when using the surface supply rig? The surface supply seems like a good idea for a number of reasons. Depth v hose length is the only real downside seems to me. You may have found a use for my 104 LP monster tank, surface supply! That beast weights 73 lbs full, the days of humping that thing are over. A good yak can open up a lot of dive sites here in the ocean state.

Rich Keller
11-17-2011, 07:21
I set this up to be used for shallow water dives close to shore so I did not need too much hose. I went with 50' that will work well to about 25-30' of water. Also given the limited area of the kayak I thought a longer hose would be too much to work with. I also attached a life line to the hose so I am pulling the kayak by the line not the hose itself. In water that shallow I do not use a bail out bottle but if you choose to use one the smallest one you have should due fine.

AfterDark
11-22-2011, 03:26
Hey Rick, Do you use anything to buoy the hose / line rig? I'm thinking it's important to keep the hose / line off the bottom.
Or is the air in the line enough to keep the setup positive or neutrual?

Rich Keller
11-22-2011, 06:30
The umbilical will be negative but with you pulling the kayak with it the umbilical should not be dragging along the bottom unless you are in very shallow water. I prefer it to be negative so you reduce the chance of a boat coming by and running over the umbilical. What type of bottom conditions are in the area you planing to use this?

AfterDark
11-23-2011, 02:21
Some areas I know will be rocky, other areas will be unknown to me until I dive them. Learning about and handling a umbilical sounds like a skill I'll be learning in the future. There must be a harness of some type to secure it to you, so it's not straining the hose connetion?

Yeah having a length of hose floating on the surface is not a good thing. Even if each float had a divers flag on it, it wouldn't help!
I was thinking more neutrual than positive, mostly that it's not dragging and getting hung up. As you state pulling the yak along should help that. Thanks for your help. I'm sure I'll be enjoying yak diving sooner as result. I'm still in the search phase, finding a 14' or longer tandem sit on top yak used is going to take some time.

Rich Keller
11-23-2011, 06:11
Once in a while the umbilical may get hung up on something but I have not found it to be a big problem. Most of it will be off the bottom so whatever it gets hung up on will usually be within sight. I use a commercial diving harness with a snap shackle for quick release of the umbilical if needed. This harness can also be fitted with a bailout bottle. You should be able to find one like this used for about $50-75 or you could make your own out of seat belt webbing, 4 rings and pop rivets. I also attached a couple of pics of my umbilical.

Rich Keller
12-01-2011, 17:43
If you are in the market for a commercial diving harness check this one out. Looks a little worn but it will do the job very well.

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AfterDark
12-02-2011, 02:52
If you are in the market for a commercial diving harness check this one out. Looks a little worn but it will do the job very well.

eBay - New & used electronics, cars, apparel, collectibles, sporting goods & more at low prices (http://www.ebay.com/itm/200682220197?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#ht_500wt_1169)

Thanks for the heads up. I do have enough the material and know how to make one. I made a harness for the safety line for ice diving, long gone now but I can whip up a useable harness some afternoon. What does a 50ft umbilical weight? I'm thinking it's on the weighty side. Line and hose aren't light in long lenghts.

Rich Keller
12-02-2011, 17:27
It is not very heavy, I could weigh it when I get a chance but it is not going to be a big concern, it should work out to be something less then about 10lbs. I chose a 50' umbilical because it was easy to work with in the confined space of a kayak and was enough for the depths I was using it in. I try to keep this as simple and low impact as possible.

AfterDark
12-13-2011, 02:08
It is not very heavy, I could weigh it when I get a chance but it is not going to be a big concern, it should work out to be something less then about 10lbs. I chose a 50' umbilical because it was easy to work with in the confined space of a kayak and was enough for the depths I was using it in. I try to keep this as simple and low impact as possible.

Don't weight it on my account. Weight is realtive anyway. My old 72's got heavier through the years;)

I agree KISS is a beautifui thing to strive for. Thanks again for your advise.