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Flatliner
09-22-2007, 13:15
Hi all,

I am looking for ideas. My son and I are going to be diving at the YMCA pool a couple of times a week this winter. How can we keep our gear safe from the chlorine? I have considered a large rinse tank with the chlorine treatment that they make for fish tanks but I don't know enough chemistry to know if this would be ok.

Does anyone have any home brewed neutralizer that would be cheaper and ok to use?

Thanks in advance.

crpntr133
09-22-2007, 13:24
If it is like most public pools you are probably going to have some odd colored gear. Rinse really well right after getting out and you might be fine.
They also sell a solution that is used for bathing suits and such. Not sure of the name but my GF used it for her swimming classes because the chlorine faded her first suit really bad.

bperrybap
09-22-2007, 14:46
I found that some pools are so overly chlorinated that
even immediate rinsing isn't enough.
I did some pool dives and the rash guard I had on smelled
of strong chlorine even after several washings/rinsings
and even drying.
I was amazed that the chlorine smell lingered.
I figured that it couldn't be good for the rest of the gear.
Since I have several large aquariums I tried using
some of the de-chlorinator I use on my fish tanks. It worked
like a charm. Removed the chlorine smell completely.
Now I use it on all my gear when I do my final rinsings in
the bathtub.

Top-Fin makes an inexpensive product that you can pick
up at Walmart.

--- bill

wkowalski
09-22-2007, 14:57
Sodium thiosulfate is a chlorine neutralizer. If you can't find it locally you can get it online (http://www.chemistrystore.com/sodium_thiosulfate.htm (http://www.chemistrystore.com/sodium_thiosulfate.htm))

Wayne...

quasimoto
09-22-2007, 16:08
Goodluck! If it is as strong as most public pools you will have some funky colored gear. I have also heard that chlorine is hard on neoprene.

James
09-23-2007, 02:24
I have also heard that chlorine is hard on neoprene.

That is true. Chlorine is hard on everything because it is an oxidizer.
Chlorine is not the only thing that can affect you in the pool.
If saturation index in the pool water is too high, it will leave a white residu behind when it dries. If it is too low, the water could be corrosive. The corrosion would show up in any jewlery you are wearing before it shows in stainless steel. It would also turn the pool water a copper green color becasue it would corrode the inside of the heaters too.

I know about pool chemistry because I used to work with computerized chemical controlers so I could tell you how it effects everything from the pump room, to the pool surface, to the air in the room the indoors pool is located, but I do not know enough about scuba gear to say how much it will be affected. I do know, however, that a swimsuit will fade over time even if you rinse off after getting out of the pool.

If you are just looking for something to get the residual chlorine off your gear the aquarium treatment should work fine. It cannot be too harsh of a chemical if fish can live with it. Thiosulfate can be found in most pool stores and its ph should be pretty close to neutral so that should not hurt anything. But rememebr, while your gear is in the pool is when it will be most affected by the chlorine and ph.

jo8243
09-23-2007, 16:22
They sell chlorine neutralizer at swimming pool shops, but I think most of the damage will be done while you're in the water, not afterwards. You want to rinse with fresh water and that should probably be enough.

comet24
09-25-2007, 02:22
Rinse it as soon as you get out of the water and that will do about as much as you can. The chlorine will do the damage while in the water. No need to spend money on Sodium Thiosulfate. For it to have a effect you would have to rinse the gear in a solution of it as soon as you got out.

Chlorine in public pools is normally around 3.5ppm. Most health department regulate it to between 1.5-5ppm some will let you go up to 10ppm.

Lone Frogman
09-25-2007, 06:16
Buy a test kit and test the water before you get in. If the chlorine level is too high don't get in. Bring your concern to the aquatics director. If they fail to act bring your concern to the health department. Burning eyes and strong chlorine smells means the combined chlorine is too high. When the combined chlorine gets too high, the pool needs to be shocked. High combined chlorine levels actually cause the chlorine to be less effective. Shocking the pool is the way to remove the chloramines and allow the free chlorine to do its sanitation.
I dive pools for work, some of the pools I dive for work have a free chlorine as high as 30PPM. Some of my gear has shown some fading, but in the last 12 years I have no equipment damaged by high chlorine levels. However I the rinse my gear inside and out immediately after using.

Ramgib
09-25-2007, 09:17
I know that some people will wet/soak gear in fresh water just before entering pool. They say it slows the obsorbtion of the cholorinated water. Not sure how true this is.

quasimoto
09-25-2007, 15:00
I have heard about the presoaking as well but never tried it. My gear is for OW and not the pool.

ScubaJW
11-08-2007, 10:47
I agree with one person here, that while you are in the pool, it's killing your gear. I mean, it will fade your gear's true color. I would suggest get in the pool and practice for just a few minutes, that's it. Or even practice in the lake - can be anywhere and just practice there in the shallow area. That's what I would do if it was me.

NitroWill
11-08-2007, 10:53
I know that some people will wet/soak gear in fresh water just before entering pool. They say it slows the obsorbtion of the cholorinated water. Not sure how true this is.

This is what I do before using my gear in the pool - I believe it does help slow down the effects of chlorine. I also soak my hair in freshwater as it really helps in keeping hair less damaged

kroorda
12-05-2008, 15:29
Pee in it.

MSilvia
12-05-2008, 15:42
How can we keep our gear safe from the chlorine?
Use rental gear.

tndiverdude
12-28-2008, 18:38
I cant see wearing a wet suit in the pool at all. Maybe a spring suit or skin but not a wet suit.
Chlorine definately turns neoprene into this half powder half gooky stuff that pills and becomes little balls.
I saw that stuff they were talking about for neutralizing, but to be safe just don't so it.

SAdude
12-31-2008, 14:14
When I certified in the 70's, My instructor had all of us go to the showers just before we went in the pool. We would fill our suits with fresh water,(the farmer johns and jackets) He told us that this helped keep the chlorine out of the suit. Not sure if it works, but from what he said those were suits from a couple of years before our class.

Good luck

bane51031
12-31-2008, 19:10
Chlorine sucks, took it's toll on my shorty and bcd while doing my Divemaster even though I rinsed the crap out it afterwards, now we use the shops gear when doing pool classes so are gear looks pretty...

shawnwill36
01-27-2009, 07:14
i am in the pool alot and i just rinse for a very long time. never really had any problem.

H2ODoc
01-27-2009, 07:46
Some thoughts on chlorine in pools....

- rinsing in fresh water before hand should make no difference whatsoever

- chlorinated pool water will make no noticeable corrosion to your stainless steel gear. True: chlorine and chlorides are corrosive, but unless you are soaking in there for a week straight, it is negligible.

- it will, however, quickly "bleach" your wetsuit, BCD, etc.

- I've heard some people say to put conditioner in your hair before swimming to prevent chlorine attacking their hair. Seems like that has some credibility as the conditioners provide a barrier between the water and your hair. Maybe a light coating of conditioner on your BCD might slow down the bleaching. The thing to consider, though, is what is the conditioner ingredients doing to the BCD material?

- Sea water contains much higher levels or chlorides that are corrosive to stainless steel, but the relative amount of contact time results in negligible corrosion (rinse afterward, though!) DMs spend hours per day, all year long soaking in seawater - even then, the corrosion rate is somewhat negligible!

- rinsing with hot water afterward might be the best option: chlorine quickly degrades in hot water. Soak it in a hot bathtub at home.

- as stated before - sodium thiosulfate will neutralize chlorine as will sodium sulfite and other reducing agents.

- peeing in it is not a bad idea! You'd make chloramines which don't bleach as much as chlorine! Althought, they are somewhat toxic and can form carcinogens. Ooops.

The OP "Flatliner" is in Lincoln, NE. I work for a chemical company in Denver - want me to ship you 50 lbs of sodium sulfite? That would neutralize about 25 olympic sized chlorinated swimming pools! :smiley2:

(not trying to be a know-it-all here, but I've worked in water treatment for 20 years!)

Paverdude
02-10-2009, 08:37
I thought all the p from the kids in the pool would do it :)

scubadiver888
02-10-2009, 18:31
The OP "Flatliner" is in Lincoln, NE. I work for a chemical company in Denver - want me to ship you 50 lbs of sodium sulfite? That would neutralize about 25 olympic sized chlorinated swimming pools! :smiley2:

(not trying to be a know-it-all here, but I've worked in water treatment for 20 years!)
Hmm, the site wkowalski posted has 2lb, 9lb, etc. size containers of sodium thiosulfate. Would 2lbs of sodium thiosulfate neutralize an olympic sized swimming pool?

I was thinking, just bring enough chemicals to neutralize the chlorine, dump it in, then use the pool. :smiley36: No one pee in the pool though!! :smilie39:

Lone Frogman
02-11-2009, 03:34
The OP "Flatliner" is in Lincoln, NE. I work for a chemical company in Denver - want me to ship you 50 lbs of sodium sulfite? That would neutralize about 25 olympic sized chlorinated swimming pools! :smiley2:

(not trying to be a know-it-all here, but I've worked in water treatment for 20 years!)
Hmm, the site wkowalski posted has 2lb, 9lb, etc. size containers of sodium thiosulfate. Would 2lbs of sodium thiosulfate neutralize an olympic sized swimming pool?

I was thinking, just bring enough chemicals to neutralize the chlorine, dump it in, then use the pool. :smiley36: No one pee in the pool though!! :smilie39:

2 lbs I don't think so, It all depends on the level of chlorine before you start. Swimming in a unsantized pool? Ever heard of E. coli? You can have the pool to your self. Don't forget you will need to disable the chlorine feeding system also. The chlorine feed rate on a olympic size pools is quite high.

scubadiver888
02-11-2009, 07:13
The OP "Flatliner" is in Lincoln, NE. I work for a chemical company in Denver - want me to ship you 50 lbs of sodium sulfite? That would neutralize about 25 olympic sized chlorinated swimming pools! :smiley2:

(not trying to be a know-it-all here, but I've worked in water treatment for 20 years!)
Hmm, the site wkowalski posted has 2lb, 9lb, etc. size containers of sodium thiosulfate. Would 2lbs of sodium thiosulfate neutralize an olympic sized swimming pool?

I was thinking, just bring enough chemicals to neutralize the chlorine, dump it in, then use the pool. :smiley36: No one pee in the pool though!! :smilie39:

2 lbs I don't think so, It all depends on the level of chlorine before you start. Swimming in a unsantized pool? Ever heard of E. coli? You can have the pool to your self. Don't forget you will need to disable the chlorine feeding system also. The chlorine feed rate on a olympic size pools is quite high.
Dave,

:smiley36: & :smilie39: == joking.