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TGK
02-11-2013, 21:44
So my friends are posting photos of a ski trip and the first thought that comes to mind..."I wonder what ice diving is like"

snagel
02-11-2013, 22:18
Yep, he's hooked!

navyhmc
02-12-2013, 08:08
Bwhaahaahaahaaa!

Look master! We have snared another poor hapless soul!!!

You won't regret it either!!!

navyhmc
02-12-2013, 08:23
"Igor, quit being an impolite lout! Get our new guest some Kool aid and cookies!"

PACKRMAN
02-12-2013, 10:11
With a bp/w to go.

bfmorgan
02-12-2013, 12:45
Once upon a time someone inquired about diving what looked like a mudhole in Kansas City just off the expressway. Navy knew the location, depth, pros/cons. This is what happens when the dive bug bites. Every puddle of water is an opportunity and you want to make the most of it.

Have you thought about diving in the pond that they use for making snow at the resort?

scubadiver888
02-12-2013, 20:32
"Igor, quit being an impolite lout! Get our new guest some Kool aid and cookies!"

I'm pretty sure he found the kool aid and cookies. Now if you send him up to Canada we'll teach him ice diving. Bwhaahaahaahaaa!

snagel
02-12-2013, 21:43
You don't look at a puddle of water the same....Heck, I've been know to take a drive just to look at mudholes to determine if I could dive it. Almost jumped in my pond a couple winters ago because it looked so clear.

Snagel

Davetowz
02-13-2013, 19:31
Ice diving is awesome! mudholes too!

bfmorgan
02-13-2013, 19:56
Yup, Davetowz's signature line sums it up....

PlatypusMan
02-14-2013, 23:59
So my friends are posting photos of a ski trip and the first thought that comes to mind..."I wonder what ice diving is like"

Are you going to the lake this weekend? If so, come back afterwards and tell us if you're still interested, as I will teach dry suit to the proper Padawan.

TGK
02-15-2013, 19:59
Yes I'm headed to the lake this weekend. Any tips to stay warm? Lol

bfmorgan
02-15-2013, 20:38
Lots of them. Take warm water and pour it inside your suit just before diving. You can put very warm water in a cooler and take it to the lake.The 12 oz. or so spring water/purified bottled water containers work well. Make sure the water is not too hot before putting it in the suit. You will experience some serious damage if it is too hot.

Avoid wind when your suit is wet. Amazingly the water evaporation can chill your body temp. Portable shelters and propane heaters are used by many divers when the temps are real cold.

Gloves and hoods are worth their weight in gold. Temperature affects a lot of things. You will use more energy, and consume more air in cold water as compared to more temperate waters. Make your dives shorter to maintain body temperature.

Of course, Platypus Man has the best idea, drysuit.

navyhmc
02-16-2013, 11:35
bfmorgan is the man when it comes to cold water diving. A few other tips: Don't underestimate the value of a pair of good fitting boots-not too tight as to cut off or impeded circulation in your feet, not too loose to allow a lot of water to move in and out of them. Tuck the boots inside the legs of your suit, you stay warmer. I have 3 pairs of boots: thin low ankle for caribbean and warm waters, 3mm high ankle for summer lakes and 7mm thick soles for cold water (Bare ICE Booots for cold water)

Also: eat a very good balanced meal about 2 hours before the first dive. High complex carbs, moderate protien and moderate fat. Aviod hot drinks right after a dive because of a bit of an increased DCS risk, but after about 30 minutes, hot and preferrably thick (cocoa) drinks are great. Good snacks between dives is also important-got to keep the fuel moving in your internal furnace to keep it burning good and hot.

bfmorgan
02-16-2013, 13:45
bfmorgan is the man when it comes to cold water diving. A few other tips: Don't underestimate the value of a pair of good fitting boots-not too tight as to cut off or impeded circulation in your feet, not too loose to allow a lot of water to move in and out of them. Tuck the boots inside the legs of your suit, you stay warmer. I have 3 pairs of boots: thin low ankle for caribbean and warm waters, 3mm high ankle for summer lakes and 7mm thick soles for cold water (Bare ICE Booots for cold water)

Also: eat a very good balanced meal about 2 hours before the first dive. High complex carbs, moderate protien and moderate fat. Aviod hot drinks right after a dive because of a bit of an increased DCS risk, but after about 30 minutes, hot and preferrably thick (cocoa) drinks are great. Good snacks between dives is also important-got to keep the fuel moving in your internal furnace to keep it burning good and hot.
Good points. Just like on the surface layers are also good.....when the water gets cold I wear a 3mm hooded vest, then 7mm over that. The hooded vest stops a lot of the water exchange close to the body.

Navy has some of the best advice, I always forget to mention how important it is to eat correctly. In cold water you will burn a lot of energy, which is why you use more air and will frequently feel much more tired than after a warm water dive.

CWSWine
02-16-2013, 13:46
I could do all the above including the drysuit and still be cold until I add a hood to my kit. A properly fitting hood does wonders in keeping my overall core temp up and extending my dive time.

TGK
02-16-2013, 19:05
So I am thinking heck to the no to ice diving. It was like 52 and I was too cold. I was burning through air like it was nothing.

bfmorgan
02-16-2013, 22:47
Don't sweat air usage until you get some dives under your belt. You will find your consumption rate dropping somewhere around 12-20 dives. You have to dive a lot after that to have your consumption rate improve but it will. Good news is if you learn to dive in cold water then it gets easier in warmer water. Clearing your mask in cold water is much more difficult than in 70 degree water.

navyhmc
02-16-2013, 22:53
52f? That's not too bad. You get used to it over time. Heck, I don't know what it is, but there's something about cold water taht just calls to me. I love the 58f-48f water. 42f is a little cold but still good for 2 dives per day. but not everyone is me and for that all of us are grateful.

TGK
02-16-2013, 22:56
52f? That's not too bad. You get used to it over time. Heck, I don't know what it is, but there's something about cold water taht just calls to me. I love the 58f-48f water. 42f is a little cold but still good for 2 dives per day. but not everyone is me and for that all of us are grateful.

It's hard enough learning a new skill, and then throw additional gear (hoods and gloves) just makes things even worse...IMHO

scubadiver888
02-17-2013, 00:18
It's hard enough learning a new skill, and then throw additional gear (hoods and gloves) just makes things even worse...IMHO

I hear you. I started diving in 80F water. First dive in Canada was 14mm on the core, 5mm gloves and hood working a reel. Lost the reel at my safety stop trying to clip it to a d-ring. :(

You get used to it though.

bfmorgan
02-17-2013, 06:06
52f? That's not too bad. You get used to it over time. Heck, I don't know what it is, but there's something about cold water taht just calls to me. I love the 58f-48f water. 42f is a little cold but still good for 2 dives per day. but not everyone is me and for that all of us are grateful.
I agree with your temperature ranges, maybe a little strangely, but I prefer colder water over warm water. And for where I do most of my diving, the surface temp could be 65 degrees, but we will likely find water at depth in the 40's range anyway.

navyhmc
02-17-2013, 06:34
Yeah, after a 30 minute dive at 52 or so, when you get up in that 65 degree water, it feels like bath water.