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DZorn00
09-29-2007, 20:02
I am looking at getting my daughter into diving and she is 10. does anyone have a child this young diving. how do they do and how hard was it for them?

cgvmer
09-29-2007, 20:21
My daughter will be 10 in November. She has already told me she wants to certified when she turns 10. First off, she is a competitive swimmer so is very comfortable in the water.

This past summer, I took her on a trip doing SNUBA, which involves divign with a regulator attached to a tank floating on the surface. She did fantastic. The next thing I did with her was to play the PADI DVD that came with my son's class. This way she is more aware of terminology tha is being used.

I'l let you know how she does in Nov/Dec

comet24
09-29-2007, 20:24
OK I have no kids but the shop I DM with has a SCUBA camp every summer. Basically the kids spend the week at the pool learning to dive and about the oceans, reefs, sharks, ect. Then they go to the lake on Sat-Sun and do their check out dives. I was there for the check out dives but not during the week of pool stuff. Real job and all. The kids where great. Better then most of the adults we take up. Now part of that is the week in the pool just before. The parents have to come up and if certified can dive on there own and then we let them come on the last dive with us.

If your daughter wants to do it and with the right instructor it should be fine. Now we had a lot of staff up there for this weekend more then twice what we take up. Lots of supervision.

Stingray Brett
09-29-2007, 20:28
Im a minor and i love it!!!

Kidder
09-29-2007, 20:42
Here is a link on snuba diving. I had to look it up.
http://www.snuba.com/about_snuba.asp

ScubaToys Larry
09-29-2007, 21:21
Actually, snuba is no less, or more dangerous than scuba. It only takes 4 feet of movement when holding your breath to have a forced arterial gas embolism - doesn't matter if the tank is on your back or at the surface.

If she is mature enough, physically and emotionally - there have been a lot of 10 year old divers certified. I would like to suggest that you really try to encourage, but not push, and if she is having problems - give it more time. Let the instructor make the judgment call on if she is ready - and avoid pressure on the instructor as well!

I've seen that with diving parents, "What do you mean my son is not ready... he did the skills!" "Well, yes, but I just don't feel the comfort level is ...." "He's plenty comfortable... I want him to work with another instructor!"

You get the idea right?

Not saying you'd be like this at all - just the fact that you came here to ask the question speaks volumes for your concern for the safety... just remember - there will be years to dive together - and like the wine - Don't try to serve it before it's time.

Charlotte Smith
09-29-2007, 21:33
My friends have 13 1nd 14 year old girls and both are certified PADI OW and they actually did better than the adults in their classes, their brains seem to accept breathing underwater alot easier than the older people...

txmntman
09-29-2007, 23:14
My son just got certified this past summer. He is 12, and was certified as a NAUI Jr. Diver (no deeper than 60 ft). He now has 15 dives, and does very well....but, he was not ready a year or 2 ago. We have had lots of discussions about the dangers, and what he must do to dive safely. I was concerned when we first started. But, he has turned into a good diver, and a good dive buddy. We will be heading down to Cozumel around Thanksgiving, and are diving about once a week to keep in practice. As was said earlier, don't rush it, and the kids will do fine.

Kidder
09-29-2007, 23:17
It really depends on the kid. I have a niece that I don't think she will be ready until she's much older and nefew that could be ready right when he's ten. Just depend on maturity.

scubasavvy
09-30-2007, 00:13
It really depends on the kid. I have a niece that I don't think she will be ready until she's much older and nefew that could be ready right when he's ten. Just depend on maturity.

I second this, and also if they're not totally into it, you can't expect them to be ready for it. I know a lot of parents who would try to get their kid certified just so that they didn't have to pay someone to watch them while they were underwater...just drag the kid along. Or they're just a Clark Griswold type of parent who thinks their idea of fun is the same as everyone else's.

My cousin on the other hand who just turned 10 loves it. I took him to a friend who ran a Discover Scuba class and he likes to quiz me now on the gear and what its used for.

diverdad
09-30-2007, 10:46
My son will turn 10 in november and is constantly bugging about getting my tanks filled just so he can get in our pool to "scuba dive". He is always in the pool doing his 200 yard swim, 5min tread, practicing mask clearing, mask recovery and equilizing . I was wondering if Scuba toys has a discovery dive program if they do i will let him try it with a qualified instructor and let them decide if he is ready.

Kingpatzer
09-30-2007, 11:57
It's all about the individual kid.

My 14 year old scares the hell out of me in the water. I keep my eye on him like a hawk. He is prone to over-reacting and has self-control issues on the surface. He doesn't listen well to instruction and in general I have never been quite comfortable with letting him learn -- but I finally decided that trusting him was essential to both his development and our relationship.

My 11 year old, on the other hand, is calm, cool, reasoned, careful, detail oriented, etc. While his older brother is on the swim team, and he's never been quite comfortable swimming, he is by far the better diver. He still has some trim issues, but he is so focused on himself and his buddy at all times, that I have no concerns about him at all.

My 8 year old can't wait till he's old enough, but he's in the mold of his oldest brother, so we'll see what happens when he gets to be the right age . . .

finflippers
09-30-2007, 12:31
Our daughter got certified at twelve and seamed to love it at first but lost interest within a half dozen dives after certification. She has expressed that she might get back into diving now.

scuba-taylor
09-30-2007, 18:28
Well, I havn't gotten certified yet but I just can't wait any longer. I also have a friend who is doing it with me, she is only a few months younger then me, but we both think it's gonna be awsome!!!

scuba Widow
09-30-2007, 19:55
How young can a child start diving?

FishFood
09-30-2007, 20:03
How young can a child start diving?

Most of the agencies will certify starting at 10. Its up to the parent to decide if his or her child can handle it of course.

scuba Widow
09-30-2007, 20:06
How young can a child start diving?

Most of the agencies will certify starting at 10. Its up to the parent to decide if his or her child can handle it of course.


oh ok...Thanks I am still learning alot.

wxboy911
10-01-2007, 07:37
I have an almost 8 year old that cannot wait...He and I have done snorkeling in the pool and talked a lot about it but I think I will wait till he is at least 12...I guess. If he is ready earlier then maybe.

Vercingetorix
10-01-2007, 08:10
I have a nephew who turns 12 in January. He has expressed an interest in diving, but the kid has a hard time concentrating when being instructed. Even when told the correct way to do something, the advice is often ignored.

Thankfully, his current interest is baseball (he's on two teams), so he's not pushing his parents for diving. I've suggested to the parents to let an instructor evaluate his readiness.

DZorn00
10-02-2007, 06:42
I was told it would be better to let my Daughter do a discovery dive then let her decide if she is ready(with the instructor and my approval first of course). Would this be the best way to go? She is an awesome swimmer and should have been born a fish. So the swimming does not concern me it is the Ascending/descending that has me at odds.

scubamate
10-02-2007, 19:41
If your child wants to dive at age ten and you are agreeable make sure you get the right instructor. I have certified several 10 and 11 year olds that were very excited about learning but most importantly, I felt they were mature and ready enough.

texarkguy
10-02-2007, 20:53
My daughter turned 10 this Summer and went through the PADI junior diving certification. It helped tremendously that both I, her father, and her stepfather are involved in diving, so she had a great deal of comfort with the process. It also helped that in her classes, she had friends going through class with her. I know that isn't something you can always control, but it did help. After certification, we have been diving several times. My observation is that a child that young will feel comfortable diving, but only if a family member she trusts is very close at hand. Other than that, she has done great. Hope that helps others.

BuzzGA
10-02-2007, 21:43
Age has less to do with it than maturity...we've all seen plenty of "adult" divers we would prefer not to share an ocean with. So as long as she is ready it should be a great experience. Don't push because after all she has plenty of time to take up the addiction!

msprzeor
10-02-2007, 22:00
Hey, I'm not a parent, but I am a teacher and my husband and I have a scuba club at my school. Last year we helped certify a 10 yr old with both mom & dad and an 11 yr old with dad. Both kids ended up doing a great job but there is a lot more to consider when working with the kiddos. First, I wouldn't put a kid in a big LDS class - and I'm sure most instructors would agree since the ratio gets cut down to 4:1 when you have a 10 or 11 yr. old in class. It definitely needs to be a small class with the kids because they get cold, hungry and tired much quicker than the adults ... and we've all been there to know how long the pool & OW sessions can be.

As most have mentioned, the kids ended up doing better at the skills than most of the adults because they are generally less inhibited - it may take a few more tries to get it right, but they don't mind trying. The swim/tread was tough for them and there were times when both got really emotional at the pool ... with that said, they loved it and came back to school telling everyone how awesome it was after each session. The book work is also significantly tougher for a 10 yr old than an adult - so more patience and teaching with that. Once certified, the kids were so proud of themselves because it is a big accomplishment for a kid!

Just make sure they understand the expectations and how serious it is. For this year's class, we're going to start all kids off with the Seal Team and once they are really comfortable in the pool on scuba, we'll offer them the Jr. certification - hopefully that will make it a little easier.

I definitely recommend getting kids involved - they are great to work with!! Just keep in mind they have different needs and will react differently to various situations.

BuzzGA
10-02-2007, 22:49
Hey, I'm not a parent, but I am a teacher and my husband and I have a scuba club at my school. Last year we helped certify a 10 yr old with both mom & dad and an 11 yr old with dad. Both kids ended up doing a great job but there is a lot more to consider when working with the kiddos. First, I wouldn't put a kid in a big LDS class - and I'm sure most instructors would agree since the ratio gets cut down to 4:1 when you have a 10 or 11 yr. old in class. It definitely needs to be a small class with the kids because they get cold, hungry and tired much quicker than the adults ... and we've all been there to know how long the pool & OW sessions can be.

As most have mentioned, the kids ended up doing better at the skills than most of the adults because they are generally less inhibited - it may take a few more tries to get it right, but they don't mind trying. The swim/tread was tough for them and there were times when both got really emotional at the pool ... with that said, they loved it and came back to school telling everyone how awesome it was after each session. The book work is also significantly tougher for a 10 yr old than an adult - so more patience and teaching with that. Once certified, the kids were so proud of themselves because it is a big accomplishment for a kid!

Just make sure they understand the expectations and how serious it is. For this year's class, we're going to start all kids off with the Seal Team and once they are really comfortable in the pool on scuba, we'll offer them the Jr. certification - hopefully that will make it a little easier.

I definitely recommend getting kids involved - they are great to work with!! Just keep in mind they have different needs and will react differently to various situations.

Good points and I can't wait to see how your club does this year!

Charles R
10-03-2007, 09:08
My 10yo did fine with all of the stuff in the class and he is more of a DIR type diver that was by my choice he is certified thru PADI but works with several DIR divers and instructors to help with his skills and dive planning. he knows how to read tables and he also knows how to use the wheel and plan dived doing the math without the cheat cards. But my son is very advanced with his math skills we don't know were he got it but he is in the 3rd grade doing pre algebra and Geometry they send him to 6th grade for math. Like many others have said there are ways to see if they are ready like PADi bubble makers and PADI seal team as well as SNUBA these are all ways to see if your child has the comfort level required to to it right and do it safe!

mike_s
10-03-2007, 09:19
My suggestion for anyone who has a kid that wants to learn to dive....


Is to get them the Course books/dvd and make them read them completely. If they attack the books and read everything in them, then they will have the focus to pay attention in class. If you can't even get them to read the books, then they won't pay attention in class and no sense signing them up for it.

Basically make them prove they will follow through with it before you let them start.

ladyfish
10-03-2007, 12:12
I have two boys that are divers (11 and 14). The oldest got certified at 12, but he probably would have done fine at 10 but we weren't in an area that would be conducive to getting him trained. My 11 year old wasn't ready at 10, but was at 11.

A few suggestions:
1. If using PADI, get the DVD version instead of the book. It runs on the computer and it has the text as well as videos to explain things. Worked well with my 11 year old.
2. Realize that they get colder much more quickly. You may want to do two dives a day, but they may only be capable of doing one. I certified my son in the Bahamas, but it was colder than we expected. So he could only do one dive a day before he was too cold. No problem, we worked within his parameters.
3. If using PADI and you are concerned about the dive table problems: use the eRDP. It's allowed with PADI and is easier to use than the tables. I taught my 11 year old with the tables, but also taught him the eRDP so he could use it on the test (I'm an instructor). He didn't get any of the table problems wrong!!!
4. Make sure the gear fits!!! It is difficult to find BCD's that are small enough for 10 year olds. If the gear doesn't fit, they won't be comfortable, just like an adult. Use small tanks 50's or 63's. You can even shorten the regulator hose so it is more comfortable. Check that regulator mouthpiece too, it might be too big. you can swap it for a smaller one.

Good luck. Remember THEY have to have the desire to dive, not the parent!!!

cgvmer
10-03-2007, 13:46
Larry,
Yes thanks for pointing out the issues with SNUBA, I was using it as an example of how I was testing her comfort in the water. We had gone over the rules: always breath, equalize, go up and down slowly ..
My daughter was breathing on the reg, equalizing better than me, and generally having blast in 15ft of water (just a little deeper than the pool she's in constantly.

gcornell
10-03-2007, 15:51
My son got certified days after he turned 10. I paid extra for private lessons here in NY and he did his open water dives in T&C on the Aggressor. He has always been comfortable in the water so the certification went smoothly.

HOWEVER, I realized very early on that he does not truly understand how many bad things can happen if you don't follow the rules. This has to do with his age and maturity. We did about 20 dives in a week, but he knows that he absolutely MUST listen to me or the dive is over. Also, he needs to stay within inches of my reach.

Overall, I am very happy he got certified. It's an amazing experience to share with your child.

RoadRacer1978
10-05-2007, 11:04
My son is 6 and cannot wait until he is 10. He wants to get certified so bad. Taking him to do SASSY and when he gets a little older will do the PADI bubble maker and SEAL team. If he wants to continue to the next step I will encourage him, but not push him. He is already my dive buddy. We sit on the couch and watch shows about sharks and the ocean together all the time.

pnevai
10-05-2007, 21:10
As parents and grandparents most of us think our kids and grandchildern are the smartest kids. And many are bright, and soak up stuff like a sponge. But you must not confuse information retention with mental ability. Physical skills for diving are harder but not impossible so long as the equipment fits the child. Again one should not equate the memorization of certain physical tasks with the ability to apply those skills in a stressed situation.

Studies have proven that abstract thinking does not develop until a child is around 15 or 16 years of age. Up until that point it is memorized act and react. Reasoning skills kick in during the late teens. Children tend to run on emotion and sensation within a rather narrow tolerance band. So regardless of how the child may perform in a highly controlled situation, you need to be aware that the performance is only reliable within the parameters of that environment. So since childern of young age have not yet developed their abstract thinking and reasoning skills, when confronted with a situation outside of the the defined environment their performance will degrade severely at best and become unpredictable and erratic at worst. (In other words remember that kids tend to panic easily) Even if such an incident does not cause physical injury, the mental scars can take a lifetime to heal. (Those who have childhood fears need no further explaination)

Because of the above issues, Children should Never dive superivised by only one adult no matter how confident they may seem. It is not because the adult may not be able to assist the child, it is because in a serious situation the child will not be able to help the adult and if the adult should have a problem even a minor one, they can not remedy their own situation and still supervise the child. The difficulty the adult may experience could actually end up panicing the child just at the time when the adult is least able to assist the child. Children under 15 ideally should be supervised by no less than 3 adults. One buddy team of adults to be there for each other and a third adult to watch over the child should one of the other adults need assistance.

If only two adults are available in the buddy team with the child then while one adult is tending to the other no one is left to watch over.
the child.

Personally I feel that scuba certification should not even be considered before the age of 12 but that is only my oppinion, based on knowledge and experience as a father and grand dad.

CaptainRon
10-08-2007, 12:15
My son got certified days after he turned 10...HOWEVER, I realized very early on that he does not truly understand how many bad things can happen if you don't follow the rules. This has to do with his age and maturity. We did about 20 dives in a week, but he knows that he absolutely MUST listen to me or the dive is over. Also, he needs to stay within inches of my reach.

I agree that a child this age does not usually possess the life experiences to understand all the ways things can go wrong as related to cause and effect. I would also be concerned about how a young child would react in an emergency situation. Of course, from my job as a paramedic, I see many adults who panic in an emergency and it is the child who remains calm.

Of course, just because they get certified, it doesn't mean they are finished with learning to be a diver. My daughter just completed her junior OW certification last weekend. Certification just means she has met the requirements of the class. As I told her, now the real lessons begin. We will be spending part of every dive we make right now practicing the skills she learned during her training until I feel confident in her abilities. As a parent, I feel it is my responsibility to make sure she is capable of handling an emergency should the need arise.

danielh03
10-08-2007, 13:24
I noticed a few jr divers this past weekend.... is it normal to put an AL 80 on a 10 year olds back? He could barely stand up and not get hit in the back of the knees! felt kinda sorry for him, then i was really envious at the same time! Think of the BT he can get off that tank!

pnevai
10-08-2007, 19:11
NAUI's take offoicial take on this, exerpt from the NAUI FAQ.

Q: What is NAUI's position on lowering the minimum age for scuba certification?
A: We have reviewed the reasons that twelve was established as a minimum age and find that there is no reliable data or information by which to consider lowering it at this time. In the majority of juveniles, significant skeletal growth is ending just prior to age twelve. Recent studies have shown that there is a second phase of brain growth that occurs in ten to twelve year olds. These growth phases could be compromised by hyperbaric exposures and no one promoting lowering the age limit can demonstrate that there is no increased risk to children. Arbitrarily lowering the age limit, without any evidence and no better reason other than "to promote the sport" is in our opinion unconscionable. We do not agree that it is appropriate to certify this population as scuba divers and will not be changing the minimum age prerequisite for NAUI Worldwide scuba training and certification.
The following is an excerpt from a "Medical Answers" column published in Sources: The Journal of Underwater Education in the November/December issue 1991. While it has been over a decade since the column was published, no new data has developed to alter the opinions expressed in the column or our official position on the question of minimum age, i.e., "The minimum age for each level of training is to be reached by the water phase of the course." For courses involving the breathing of compressed gases the minimum age is twelve. Upon graduation the individual may be registered for a conditional "junior" certification.
MEDICAL ANSWERS, By R. Kelly Hill, Jr., M.D., F.A.C.M., NAUI #9243
"Little kids shouldn't dive. There, I've typed it so that it is very clear. Just like pregnancy, being a human-in-progress is a contraindication to diving. There are two rational reasons based upon diving physiology, and one irrational reason for my position on [youngsters] diving.
Rational Reason #1: The DCS risk for juveniles is unknown, and there are no decompression tables or algorithms developed specifically for them. When experts in diving medicine get together to look at incidence rates, causal factors and risk analysis, there is little consensus - and that is for adults not our children. The historical data collected on the few children who have dived is a very inadequate sample to determine if children have more or less risk than adults. Animal experiments have not been particularly helpful in determining the relative incidence of DCS in this group when compared to adults. Remember that the basic concept behind the development of decompression tables is whether or not the test group got bent using [a particular] schedule. Those groups tend to be relatively small [in number], until recently were exclusively male, and no one in his right mind would include children in a test group...
Rational Reason #2: Juveniles have a unique tissue risk for decompression sickness. Though all of a juvenile's tissues are in transition, one tissue type in particular is at potential risk for DCS: bone. As the skeleton grows , it does so by lengthening bones at their ends, through the growth plates. Just like with other tissues, if something, such as a bubble, damages this tissue or its blood supply, the tissue fails. The growth plate has its own set of on and off-gassing parameters, and they are ones that were not necessarily included in the testing of decompression schedules. If a growth plate dies, that bone does not grow from that end and the bone is permanently distorted. If the distortion is significant, the result may be surgery, disability or both... the risk is real and the incidence unknown.
Irrational Reason #1: Risk/Benefit.
Since the data is not clear, why take a risk? Diving is a wonderful experience, but there are lots of wonderful experiences open to kids, like growing up with two legs the same length. The benefits of children diving are not commensurate with the risk.

mike_s
10-09-2007, 11:33
I noticed a few jr divers this past weekend.... is it normal to put an AL 80 on a 10 year olds back? He could barely stand up and not get hit in the back of the knees! felt kinda sorry for him, then i was really envious at the same time! Think of the BT he can get off that tank!


a lot of younger divers use AL63's to fix this problem. or maybe a steel72

A good instructor would have noticed this right away and tried to help outfit the youth properly.

mm2002
10-10-2007, 10:39
There was a 10 year old boy in our class, and although he had a tough time with the book work, he was a natural under water. Our daughter is 6, and she can't wait to turn 10! That kid in our class gave us a lot of confidence that she will do fine.

BuzzF117
10-10-2007, 12:08
I am the father of twin 14 yr olds boy and a girl and I am planning on getting my daughter certified next summer but my son lacks the self control to make me feel comfortable enough to get him certified at this time. Both can handle the bookwork portion with no problem and the confined pool dives would be fine but im not confident my son could do an open water he would want to shoot to the surface so he could tell everybody how cool that last fish he saw was or he would want to go after it.

DZorn00
10-10-2007, 14:01
I am the father of twin 14 yr olds boy and a girl and I am planning on getting my daughter certified next summer but my son lacks the self control to make me feel comfortable enough to get him certified at this time. Both can handle the bookwork portion with no problem and the confined pool dives would be fine but im not confident my son could do an open water he would want to shoot to the surface so he could tell everybody how cool that last fish he saw was or he would want to go after it.
i kinda want to do this too. Just go up and tell every one what I had seen. I know my daughter will want to do that too. I would have a hard time taking my daughter any lower than 45 feet anyways.

GNX Guy
10-22-2007, 16:16
My son turned 10 this past July. Passed the written test with flying colors. Remembered more than I did. He is doing great in the confined water dives so far and had done the skills equal too or better than the adults. Remembers more things than I. He has a tad bit of a problem equilizing due to his nose being so small, its hard for him to squeez his nose.

kfore
11-03-2007, 20:48
My 10 1/2 year old son and I both completed OW training together this summer. He mastered and retained the bookwork better than some of the 40-somethings in our class. Skills were not a problem except for fin pivots (low-fat little body tended to sink a bit - ahh the problems of youth...). All in all, he mastered the various water skills faster than I did.

I strongly agree with comments made elsewhere in this thread. A lot depends upon the maturity and desire of the child in question. It also helped that we have a swimming pool at home and he is very comfortable in the water and a strong swimmer.

As a parent, I have to say that I have never had as intense an experience as I did when going through classes with my son. This was the first time I can recall that he was my peer: he was my equal in skills and knowledge, and when we were dive buddies, I knew he had my back.

I was able to see a small glimpse of that future day when I will look him in the eye as a man and know that I did something right as a parent. Excuse me now - I need to go tell him to clean his room and stop picking on his sister...

couped243
11-03-2007, 21:36
My son was certified this year he's 14. He was amazing in the pool, better than the adults in his class but had some minor issues with the tables. I don't think that he would have been ready at ten. Just not focused enough, but that's an idividual thing. He got it together though and did his OW check out dives on Father's day weekend. I'm currently deployed so I unfortunately I had to miss it. But we'll make up for it this up-coming season.

Scubling
11-06-2007, 15:10
I think it would be awsome to let your kid start scuba. I did and it was exicting ( im 11 ). But it is also alot of work reading the book, taking the tests and going underwater. In the end it was thrilling knowing that you can acutally breath underwater at such a young age!!!

teog
12-13-2007, 13:56
My 10 y/o daughter over the summer wanted to get her jr open water. We signed her up for class a local SSI shop. After we began reading the book she realized it wasnt for her.

Im hoping she changes her mind in a couple of years.

Shortyman801
12-15-2007, 10:31
I never really understood why people got certified at 14. I thought about but realized it was waaaaayyyyyy too expensive to get JOW, then have to take OW in 12 months. But, if I would have had the money, I definitely would have gotten cert. when I was 10

CaptainRon
12-15-2007, 15:18
I never really understood why people got certified at 14. I thought about but realized it was waaaaayyyyyy too expensive to get JOW, then have to take OW in 12 months. But, if I would have had the money, I definitely would have gotten cert. when I was 10

Once you are certified as a JOW, the upgrade to OW is automatic when you turn 15. You just have to get a new replacement card. No new classes to take.

Splitlip
12-15-2007, 15:58
I suppose some kids are more skilled than others, but I believe 10 yrs old is just too young.
Most states require one to be 16 or older to drive. I am of the opinion that the same level of development should be required to dive.

My daughter is a fish. She has been swimming since she was 2. Snorkeling shortly thereafter, has been helping her Key West cousins collect tropicals since she was 5, swam competetively until she discovered soccer and has been surfing since she was 9. Stronger swimmer than I. She got on me when she turned 10 to scuba. Was she ready? according to the agencies trying to sell me a certification...sure. IMO, no 10 year old is ready.
She was certified at 15.

wheelman
12-15-2007, 16:16
I agree with splitlip, 10 is to young. My oldest turned 14 in Sept. and we have had the discussions. I have decided to make him wait until he is 16 to cert. same reasoning as driving a car.

Shortyman801
12-15-2007, 22:20
I never really understood why people got certified at 14. I thought about but realized it was waaaaayyyyyy too expensive to get JOW, then have to take OW in 12 months. But, if I would have had the money, I definitely would have gotten cert. when I was 10

Once you are certified as a JOW, the upgrade to OW is automatic when you turn 15. You just have to get a new replacement card. No new classes to take.



Seriously? My birthday is May 7, So if I get JOW certified in March, I don't have to take any other course to get OW, just get a new card?

I think that when you get your permit should be when you get SCUBA. You are mature and responsible enough to drive a car, which is probably more dangerous (at least where I live it is). I believe 16 is too long, but 10 is a little too young. Putting myself in a concerned father's shoes, I can see how scary putting you 10 yr. old underwater on life support is.

downunder
12-17-2007, 12:33
Seriously? My birthday is May 7, So if I get JOW certified in March, I don't have to take any other course to get OW, just get a new card?

I think that when you get your permit should be when you get SCUBA. You are mature and responsible enough to drive a car, which is probably more dangerous (at least where I live it is). I believe 16 is too long, but 10 is a little too young. Putting myself in a concerned father's shoes, I can see how scary putting you 10 yr. old underwater on life support is.


Yes - the JROW is automatically upgraded to an OW.

Personally, I don't think relating the age of diving to a drivers license age is appropiate! That is taking the leap that the government knows all when they say any child 15.99 years old is not mature enough to handle a vehicle and any that is 16 years old is. Well, we can all find a few 17 year olds that should NOT be driving!

It all comes down to maturity. Funny thing is many parents don't really know how mature their kids are because they don't spend time with them doing homework and other activities! But anyways... I got my son certified at 10 and he is now 11. He has completed over 20 dives including ship wrecks, sharks, low visibility in Michigan to name a few. He had done a wonderful job in the classes (he scored the higest - even above the adults in the class!) and I enjoy him as a dive partner.

Also, it is something they have to want and are willing to work for. My son has studied A LOT. My other son who is now 10 isn't that interested in it. He won't be going through the classes unless something changes in that are and he is able to demonstrate that.

CaptainRon
12-18-2007, 16:47
My 13 yo daughter just got certified as a JOW diver. Of course, right now she is only allowed to dive with me. I feel I know her abilities and experience level better than anyone, so at her age, I would not even allow her to dive with an instructor or divemaster if I was not with her. I feel like her interest in diving has given me just a little bit more time that I am able to spend with her until she decides that it is no longer "cool" to hang around with Dad.:smiley19:

FYI, we will be diving Grand Cayman and Cozumel in 3 weeks. Yea!!!

mm2002
12-18-2007, 17:40
My 13 yo daughter just got certified as a JOW diver. Of course, right now she is only allowed to dive with me. I feel I know her abilities and experience level better than anyone, so at her age, I would not even allow her to dive with an instructor or divemaster if I was not with her. I feel like her interest in diving has given me just a little bit more time that I am able to spend with her until she decides that it is no longer "cool" to hang around with Dad.:smiley19:

FYI, we will be diving Grand Cayman and Cozumel in 3 weeks. Yea!!!


Way to go! That sounds exciting! I can't wait until my oldest daughter is old enough.

PsychDiver
12-19-2007, 11:07
I started in the pool with my father (Prior UDT and commercial diver) at age 5. That was 1962. I started diving at age 10. By age 12 I was pumping my own tanks. By age 14 I was solo diving in rivers and lakes up to about 25'. But I look now at some 10 year olds and think "no way would I let them dive." My daughter and wife say they wouldn't let kids dive until 12. I think it is the maturity of the child. In my childhood there were no standards and we often flew by the seat of our pants. I don't agree that your have to be fifteen to be able to rationalize. At 18 months an infant develops object permanence were they know that an object that goes out of view still exists. That is abstract reasoning. It is not the inability to reason or problem solve that is the issue. It is the lack of life experiences to use in the problem solving process.

CaptainRon
12-19-2007, 18:26
Way to go! That sounds exciting! I can't wait until my oldest daughter is old enough.
Won't take long. Seems like they grow up so fast........

mm2002
12-19-2007, 18:45
Way to go! That sounds exciting! I can't wait until my oldest daughter is old enough.
Won't take long. Seems like they grow up so fast........


OK, there's a reality slap for me. I take back what I said about not being able to wait till she's old enough. I can wait!
Man, you're right, they grow up so damn fast. She's 7, and my youngest is going on 3. If I could keep then exactly like they are right now, I'd consider it! :smiley19:

cindybindy
01-21-2008, 10:31
My grandaughter will be turning 10 in May and is looking forward to getting her open water diving done.

She absolutely loves the water. Her first trip to Cozumel was when she was 19 months old and she started snorkeling at that time (since then she has been to Cozumel 5 times). When she turned 8 she took the PADI Seal class and became a certified PADI Seal and did some shallow shore diving in Cozumel last year with a DI. She is thrilled to think that this spring/summer she will be taking her open water course and getting to dive with grandma, grandpa, her mom, and uncle off the boat in Cozumel next year. If she didn't feel so comfortable in the water I don't think it would work too well, but like I said she has been snorkeling since she was very young and really likes the water and has only respect for it.

PsychDiver
01-21-2008, 16:58
It sounds like she is well prepared. She will be able to do the skills but keep her close because it is the problem solving skills of youngsters that are not yet developed.

gbrdiver
01-23-2008, 05:19
My son is 13, has his Jn AOW and about 50 dives now. His theory knowledge is up there with his instructors...and his muturity underwater is amazing. I have already been at the end of a verbal tirade after a dive in almost zero vis - that he called! His instructor tells me he has never had a problem with a junior that really wants to dive - they do the skills first time, know all the answers...and know that they can call a dive with no questions asked. Hell, I wish I could do that when I started!

ChrisA
02-19-2008, 13:13
I am looking at getting my daughter into diving and she is 10. does anyone have a child this young diving. how do they do and how hard was it for them?

Just a word of warning: Most 10 year olds will not be able pass the OW class. Your daughter may be an exception. The ideal 10 year old will be larger than average, a very, very strong swimmer with water skills who maybe has progressed through many of the YMCA swim classes and a nearly straight A student.

The PADI OW book, I think is written at about the level of a middle school science text book. It is certainly not a 5th grade level text. More likely middle school level I think. The gear is also heavy. Many kids this age simply lack strenght and can't gear up and get in and out of the water on their own.

Next there is the problem of supervising a young diver. PADI guidlines say that she would have to dive with a buddy who is either (1) her parent or (2) a "profesional" (meaning a dive master or instructor.) The problem with #1 (the parent) is that you really, really do need some training in how to supervise divers. I'd say at a dead minimum you need to have finished the rescue class. Newly OW certified parents are completely un-qualified to supervise newly certified children. Also the 10 year old is not going to be able to help an adult buddy who is in trouble. No 10 year old is mature enough to manage an emergency situation in the water by herself. So that adult budy is in effect a solo diver and should be qualified to dive solo. That said the supervision problem is solvable.

One other thing to watch out for is the instructor who might allow the 10 year old to have to much "help" in class. They need to be treated as equals to adults and do their own thinking, reading and gear handling. If they can't they should not get that OW c-card. Like I said most 10 year olds will not pass the class. But some do.

One thing you can do to see if she is ready is try free diving. How is she with with mask, find and snorkle on "real" open water. can she swim down and look at the fishes. can she get to 10 or 20 feet of depth? I'd make sure she is very comfortable as a free diver/snorkler before getting into scuba.

ChrisA
02-19-2008, 13:24
My son is 13, has his Jn AOW and about 50 dives now. His theory knowledge is up there with his instructors...and his muturity underwater is amazing. I have already been at the end of a verbal tirade after a dive in almost zero vis - that he called! His instructor tells me he has never had a problem with a junior that really wants to dive - they do the skills first time, know all the answers...and know that they can call a dive with no questions asked. Hell, I wish I could do that when I started!

There is a huge difference between 10 years of age and 13 years. We are talking 5th graders vs. 8th graders here. The 13 year old is headed to high school very soon while the 10 year old is in elementary school. Kids grow up fast. three years makes a big difference

The instructors tell me that most 12 years olds who work at it will pass the OW class while most 10 year old will not pass. Of course there are exceptions.

My son did OW at age 14 and did very well. But was a strong swimmer, had experience surfing (we live near the beach) and had done quite a bit of free diving out in the ocean. We'd spend hours and hours out in the kelp beds for the few years before to took OW. Where the kids seems the be lacking is when stuff goes wrong.

Little Wolf
03-14-2008, 18:27
I am 10 and i am going to get my junior open water this summer.

Little Wolf
03-19-2008, 15:03
I am 10 and I am getting my Junior Open Water this summer,I can't wait.Me and my dad(Dark Wolf)will then get to go diving together!

Wonka
03-19-2008, 21:46
I took my 13 year old daughter on a discovery dive before even considering letting her do her ow. We did the dive in the local pool, and I filled her in on what to expect, (equalizing, mask squeeze, clearing etc.) and let her know that when we hit the water, I would be there, but she was to listen to the dive master. She had a hard time equalizing, and the mask kept fogging, I feared that she would be turned off by the experience. She absolutely LOVED IT, and was hooked as hard as I am, then it was a two hour drive each way to do her classes. She missed by two questions on her first try, but because of the timing, had to complete her written & OW dives in punta cana. After her pool check at the resort, the divemaster said she was more than ready for her open water dives, 18 dives later, she completed her OW, then we both did our AOW.
It was an amazing experience to share with her, everyone of the seven DM we dove with said she was born to dive. She never surfaced with less than 800 psi, even on two of our 60 minute dives, and after her first two open water dives, you could just see the passion for the sport developing.
I did notice she had a hard time with the text end of the certification, but I might have scared her beforehand. I told her that it was the most important test she would take, and that not learning the material could be fatal. If they are old enough to understand this, then they are mature enough to be certified.
sorry about the length
good luck

mm2002
03-19-2008, 22:41
I am 10 and I am getting my Junior Open Water this summer,I can't wait.Me and my dad(Dark Wolf)will then get to go diving together!

Wow, that is cool!!! My oldest daughter is 7, and she's already watching the OW videos and soaking up every little bit. Your Dad is a lucky man! (and you are a lucky daughter!)

scuba007
03-20-2008, 08:41
Wow. Good to have your dad as a dive buddy.
Good luck and have lots of fun doing your OW

Brandon Belew
03-20-2008, 09:01
So DW, going to get LW set up in a drysuit and doubles so you can take her to the armageddon?

cummings66
03-20-2008, 21:18
Double 40's, cool. Might even double 19's? Seriously, I think as a parent that I don't want to think about it. I have enough trouble convincing myself that someday I will need to turn my daughter Elizabeth loose on her own.

She is 5 and keeps asking for a tank of her own, even thought my AL40 was her tank for a while. I've wondered if I could let her learn to dive at 10, to be honest I don't think I can.

My reasoning is simple, her bones are still growing and there is the question about bone damage at such an early age. I do my best to protect her from harm and the unknown, and to me this is such a large unknown.

I've been teaching her how to swim since she was one and I should have started sooner in fact, but the thing is, I want her to be able to take care of herself without me being around, yet I don't want to not be there to take care of her. It's a conundrum.

As any parent here will attest to, she means more to me than my own life does. There is nothing I would not do to protect her. If new facts come to light I will evaluate them and reconsider. Until then, there is swimming and snorkeling.

Scubling
03-23-2008, 10:14
It's not to bad as long as you are willing to study hard and try your best underwater

Draq
03-25-2008, 16:47
My 10 year old just completed his OW class and pool work and will be doing his OW dives next week. He has been "begging" for about a year.

He had no problem at all with the materials, swim test, tread or anything else for that matter. A 13 year old and an 11 year old were also in his class and they did fine as well. I thought maybe the tables would throw him but he didn't want or need any help from me.

I think he is a very bright and mature kid for his age, and I have been on dive boats with adults who worried me more than he does, but that is another story. I don't think he is exceptionally large or strong.

Before we let him do this we let him do a discover scuba diving class in Cozumel and I dove with him on those dives and watched him carefully to see how he seemed to handle it. I also sought the advice of the instructor about whether she thought he could handle scuba.

He understands the depth limits and that he will be held to them. There will have to be concessions made by me, his mom and his brother so that he can dive safely, but that's okay. I think a lot of shallow dives are in our collective future.

Splitlip
03-25-2008, 19:48
I am looking at getting my daughter into diving and she is 10. does anyone have a child this young diving. how do they do and how hard was it for them?


Next there is the problem of supervising a young diver. PADI guidlines say that she would have to dive with a buddy who is either (1) her parent or (2) a "profesional" (meaning a dive master or instructor.) The problem with #1 (the parent) is that you really, really do need some training in how to supervise divers. I'd say at a dead minimum you need to have finished the rescue class. Newly OW certified parents are completely un-qualified to supervise newly certified children. Also the 10 year old is not going to be able to help an adult buddy who is in trouble. No 10 year old is mature enough to manage an emergency situation in the water by herself. So that adult budy is in effect a solo diver and should be qualified to dive solo. That said the supervision problem is solvable.



DING DING DING

Splitlip
03-25-2008, 19:50
My son is 13, has his Jn AOW and about 50 dives now. His theory knowledge is up there with his instructors...and his muturity underwater is amazing. I have already been at the end of a verbal tirade after a dive in almost zero vis - that he called! His instructor tells me he has never had a problem with a junior that really wants to dive - they do the skills first time, know all the answers...and know that they can call a dive with no questions asked. Hell, I wish I could do that when I started!

There is a huge difference between 10 years of age and 13 years. We are talking 5th graders vs. 8th graders here. The 13 year old is headed to high school very soon while the 10 year old is in elementary school. Kids grow up fast. three years makes a big difference



DING DING DING

Splitlip
03-25-2008, 19:57
ChrisA is right on.
There are sooo many things that can go wrong. A lot of recently certified divers want to believe they can grow their buddies right now. Patience people.
Please get a taste of what can go wrong down there before you get your kids in too quickly.

matt_w
03-31-2008, 11:47
My Son who is now 11 was certified last August along with his 14 year old brother. He was 10 at the time he was certified and did great. I think it has to be an individual decision. He did get a little nervous when we went to the lake, I think it was all of the Adult divers running around than the diving it self. I stayed with him and an instructor while my older Son finished with the rest of his class and they both did great.

They both have over 20 dives already and we have been having a great time.

Matt

mobeeno
04-15-2008, 22:55
My son is 10, so far we go snorkeling and freediving. I will let him get into scuba eventually

Sounder
04-17-2008, 11:29
10yo is a good age to snorkle but I think scuba should wait a few more years.

JKDiver
04-29-2008, 12:54
My daughter was certified in Roatan 11/2007, at 10 years old. She did all her classroom and pool training in the U.S. with her father. It was nice that they did the classes together so they could discuss and practice skills together. She did alot of studying and was very committed to learning. I think she got a better score on the test than me! We took her to Roatan for certification where the water was crystal clear! It was great! She loves it. We even got her her own gear. I feel she is very confident in the water, but I still want to swim next to her!

diok9
06-20-2008, 10:36
My son is approaching his 13th birthday and we are considering enrolling him in a NAUI course as one of his gifts. My wife and I have carefully considered his maturity level and i think that that is ultimately the deciding factor. I have met divers in their 30's who I believe are not fit to dive so age is a relative thing.

scuba007
06-20-2008, 10:49
Just came back from our diving trip to Italy (Elba Island). We dived with a 12 years old girl when we were there and she is much better diver then my wife and I. Are you going to be your daughter dive buddy?

cowgirldiver
06-20-2008, 12:50
My son is older (15). Though I wanted him to dive with me, I didn't want to push him. Last fall when I was at the lake diving, I took him with me. I dove and he hung out on the surface, swimming around, watching everyone, etc. When we went home he told me he would really like to see the dive platforms. There was my in....I said, I guess we'll have to put you through the class. One of the LDS gives a class here at the university, once a semester, so that's what he took. During the written (NAUI) test, he made me leave the room so no one would think he was cheating. When he did his OW, the vis was only about 1ft-the instructor mentioned what a good job he and his buddy (who was also young) did keeping in contact with each other. I think it's true that kids (who don't have attention problems) tend to pay more attention to the instructor. Now we are going to Coz in about a month and he said he wanted to make sure I was going to be his dive buddy-that certainly did my heart good to know he trusted me and wanted to do something with me.

Splitlip
06-20-2008, 17:32
What are these dive platforms of which you (and others) speak?

Are they stairs like at the springs?

I ahve seen video of what seem like free standing, under water areas with handrails and such. Are these "platforms"?

Thanks

Vercingetorix
06-21-2008, 09:41
What are these dive platforms of which you (and others) speak?

I have seen video of what seem like free standing, under water areas with handrails and such. Are these "platforms"?Yes, those are the platforms. In lakes, they are anchored to the bottom. The platforms are at different levels, such as 15 feet. Here, the students demonstrate their skills to the instructor. In deeper lakes, there are often platforms at deeper levels.

Concerning age, one of our ScubaDillo divers is a 12 year-old-girl. She's an excellent diver. She better be; her father is a diver and her step-father is an Instructor and DM.

digitalman
07-04-2008, 23:00
Actually, snuba is no less, or more dangerous than scuba. It only takes 4 feet of movement when holding your breath to have a forced arterial gas embolism - doesn't matter if the tank is on your back or at the surface.

If she is mature enough, physically and emotionally - there have been a lot of 10 year old divers certified. I would like to suggest that you really try to encourage, but not push, and if she is having problems - give it more time. Let the instructor make the judgment call on if she is ready - and avoid pressure on the instructor as well!

I've seen that with diving parents, "What do you mean my son is not ready... he did the skills!" "Well, yes, but I just don't feel the comfort level is ...." "He's plenty comfortable... I want him to work with another instructor!"

You get the idea right?

Not saying you'd be like this at all - just the fact that you came here to ask the question speaks volumes for your concern for the safety... just remember - there will be years to dive together - and like the wine - Don't try to serve it before it's time.

I like the way you said this. My kids will want to dive at an early age too I'm sure since they're already showing an interest, so I hope I'm not the pushy parent. I've already decided I won't be an instructor in their classes (not an instructor yet, but might be by the time they age into diving). I just hope that whoever their instructor is that he is wise enough to know when they're ready, not just sign off because they met the requirements.

digitalman
07-04-2008, 23:03
I am 10 and I am getting my Junior Open Water this summer,I can't wait.Me and my dad(Dark Wolf)will then get to go diving together!

Enjoy the time spent with your dad. I'm sure he'll be very proud of you.

cgvmer
07-07-2008, 12:45
My daughter(10yo) started her scuba camp today, only 3 other kids in the camp for a 5 full days (9:30-3:45) then ready for OW dives. I'll keep you posted on how the class goes.

cgvmer
07-12-2008, 08:04
Ok so my daughter (10yo) had a blast in scuba camp. The LDS had only 4 kids in the class, and they all appeared to have fun. Now we take them to Dutch Springs on 7/19 & 7/20 for their OW dives....