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WaScubaDude
09-29-2007, 20:52
Please tell us about your best and the worst dive buddy. Why is your best dive buddy, your best, and why is your worst dive buddy your worst?

I had a dive buddy once who would simply swim away as soon as we got underwater. At best, we would surface somewhere near each other. It's not all bad being alone, at least you know you're the one taking care of yourself.

I've also had great dive buddies who would keep a good watch on me while we were diving. He actually reattached my tank as it was slipping out of my tank strap.

How about you?

paintsnow
09-30-2007, 13:43
i got buddied up with a diver fresh out of AOW with followed OW immediately.

to say the least he was horrible. i dont know how he got certified.

he couldn't get down at first but after some flailing he finally made it down a but and pressure helped compress his wetsuit.

during the dive i got kicked by him multiple times even though i was at somewhat of a distance. he didn't fin, he flailed.

then later on during the dive he randomly swims off to show the DM his pressure, i guess he did that cause the DM was also his instructor. further on when the DM asked everyone for their pressure he was really really low. i don't remember what it was, but he should have been on the boat with that much pressure.

so he never told me he was low on air. after i saw him signal his pressure to the DM, i swam a bit below him and kept watching his gauge, i don't know if he would have tried to swim to the front to share air with the DM if he ran out (we were in the back) or what.

over all i felt like i was responsible for him and had to watch him, which didn't make me feel comfortable because i was only AOW from a few days before.

so the dive was horrible and i spent the time recovering and clearing my mask and reg, and watching his SPG

Kidder
09-30-2007, 13:51
i got buddied up with a diver fresh out of AOW with followed OW immediately.

to say the least he was horrible. i dont know how he got certified.

he couldn't get down at first but after some flailing he finally made it down a but and pressure helped compress his wetsuit.

during the dive i got kicked by him multiple times even though i was at somewhat of a distance. he didn't fin, he flailed.

then later on during the dive he randomly swims off to show the DM his pressure, i guess he did that cause the DM was also his instructor. further on when the DM asked everyone for their pressure he was really really low. i don't remember what it was, but he should have been on the boat with that much pressure.

so he never told me he was low on air. after i saw him signal his pressure to the DM, i swam a bit below him and kept watching his gauge, i don't know if he would have tried to swim to the front to share air with the DM if he ran out (we were in the back) or what.

over all i felt like i was responsible for him and had to watch him, which didn't make me feel comfortable because i was only AOW from a few days before.

so the dive was horrible and i spent the time recovering and clearing my mask and reg, and watching his SPG

Ugh.... That's a pretty rough dive. I wouldn't want to be stressed like that under water. That dude needed some serious training. My dive buddy is someone I've known my whole life and he is very good and a better diver than I. I've dove most of my dives with him and we have things pretty well down. the other people I dive with are my wife and his wife. I never feel like I'm going to get in any bad situations with them. I'm glad to have the company and the spare air should something go wrong.

On a side note I've learned to steer clean of OW classes. I've been kicked and dropped on by people who were shallower and then dropped down unexpectedly.

diverdad
09-30-2007, 21:48
Most of the divers that i have buddied up with are more experienced than i, but i buddied up with a young kid once he was all over the place and i felt that i had to keep an eye on him pretty close.

texdiveguy
09-30-2007, 22:22
I am my BEST dive buddy--seriously!

BUT I do have a good friend that is an excellent dive pal!!!!

paintsnow
10-01-2007, 01:37
well my buoyancy wasn't that great on the trip either. probably because it was my first time diving a steel tank and the weight was in kg, and being a stupid American kid i only comprehend pounds.

but at least i try to be a better diver and i got my buoyancy down a lot better by the end of the week.
this kid seemed content with his abilities and described it as a great dive.
didn't even apologize for kicking me 50 times.

the other people that were diving with us were from Finland
and boy did i envy them, perfect trim, perfect buoyancy, perfect everything, or at least as far as i could tell.

ill get there one day....one day
:)

Zenagirl
10-01-2007, 07:51
Best buddy is my husband. He's always right near me and when I had an emergency this summer, he was right there with his octo so I didn't have to do an OOA.

Haven't had any other buddies, but we have a friend that dives with us and the first time we dove as a team of 3 was the worst. He would go off in a different direction to look at something that interested him and not keep track of where we were. I spent the entire dive keeping tabs on him. After a talk on the boat and a couple more dives, we got in sync and now we dive in a team of 3 almost as easily as just 2.

ccarter
10-01-2007, 08:40
Just about all of my dives have been with my brother but I did do a few with a guy from work this summer which didn't go so well. He's pretty inexperienced and ended up standing/walking along the bottom.. disappearing randomly.. tried to go in a cave at a spring.. was not too much fun.

jo8243
10-01-2007, 15:02
Just about all of my dives have been with my brother but I did do a few with a guy from work this summer which didn't go so well. He's pretty inexperienced and ended up standing/walking along the bottom.. disappearing randomly.. tried to go in a cave at a spring.. was not too much fun.

Is he the guy that tried to walk on the jetties at Panama City with all his gear on? lol.

dallasdivergirl
10-01-2007, 15:06
I haven't really had a bad dive buddy yet.

I am hoping it doesn't happen any time soon.

ccarter
10-01-2007, 15:10
Just about all of my dives have been with my brother but I did do a few with a guy from work this summer which didn't go so well. He's pretty inexperienced and ended up standing/walking along the bottom.. disappearing randomly.. tried to go in a cave at a spring.. was not too much fun.

Is he the guy that tried to walk on the jetties at Panama City with all his gear on? lol.
Word.

Defman
10-01-2007, 15:30
I posted this earlier, it looks like we lost some posts... (edit: yep, just saw server swap post)

I'll admit to being a bad buddy. The vast majority of the time I am on a trip alone and get on a boat with people who are with buddies. So for me it's like a solo dive with other people around! Maybe I'm wrong, but I'd like to think that I'm anyone's buddy and they are mine! I'm so used to being alone that I forget to pay attention to others.

Example of being a bad buddy.. Last December I was buddied with a friend of a friend, all I knew was that he was an experienced DM. So... I really didn't worry about him. Friends failed to mention that it was his first trip since losing (as in died) a student in a class and he was pretty shook up about it. I lost sight of him while descending, being confident in his skills I assumed I'd catch up with him at the bottom. He never showed. Lucky for me he went back to the boat. Friend (also my instructor) wasn't happy with me for losing him, then filled me in on the story.

Regardless, I was a very bad buddy that day....

datamunk
10-01-2007, 22:28
well, i have my worst dive buddy experience.

overall, i prefer to dive somewhat alone, for solitude and because im always with students.

i used to work in a dive shop, and one rainy day this guy, Matt L., came in, talking up a storm about how he is an awesome diver and a former NAVY SEAL. (and SSI open water).

Anyway, he is simply annoying just to talk to, all the stupid stories he creates (obviously). Finally I took him out with me to do some lobstering, and the way I do it is with a tickle stick and then to grab em, and stick in my bag. Anyway...

We are diving along, he takes off against the current (drift divin) and i decide hey, hes a navy seal, he can dive solo... so, after our first dive he has managed to have lost his net and snare and tickle stick that he has never used before. the next dive, he follows behind me (which is fine) and just about every time id grab for a lobster his hand would beat me, and scare it off, causing me to get all of 2 lobsters.

..he then lost his dive knife.

anyway, while under water id peek behind me to see how he was doin, expectin great skills, and he was definately bouncing from sand to 10-15 feet up and down and up and down. needless to say, i informed him i will never take him diving because he A) got in my space B) is too much of a liability

once i quit, the navy seal got ajob at my dive shop somehow.

anyway, my main dive buddy is a customer of mine that turned to a good friend, and we went thru divemaster together... i dont mind diving with him, or my lil clique of divers i know, but other than that, i will probably be babysitting you cuz i see you actin all wild ;)

WaScubaDude
10-31-2007, 17:57
I posted this earlier, it looks like we lost some posts... (edit: yep, just saw server swap post)

I'll admit to being a bad buddy. The vast majority of the time I am on a trip alone and get on a boat with people who are with buddies. So for me it's like a solo dive with other people around! Maybe I'm wrong, but I'd like to think that I'm anyone's buddy and they are mine! I'm so used to being alone that I forget to pay attention to others.

Example of being a bad buddy.. Last December I was buddied with a friend of a friend, all I knew was that he was an experienced DM. So... I really didn't worry about him. Friends failed to mention that it was his first trip since losing (as in died) a student in a class and he was pretty shook up about it. I lost sight of him while descending, being confident in his skills I assumed I'd catch up with him at the bottom. He never showed. Lucky for me he went back to the boat. Friend (also my instructor) wasn't happy with me for losing him, then filled me in on the story.

Regardless, I was a very bad buddy that day....

Last honest diver. I'd dive with ya, or without ya. hahahaha

Charlotte Smith
10-31-2007, 18:34
My husband is my dive buddy and I know without a doubt that I am safe no matter what the situation.....maybe that is not the best thing though. If I HAD to dive with someone else would I expect them to take care of me as he does now.....I am not so sure I would get that from anyone else.

WaScubaDude
11-01-2007, 01:20
My husband is my dive buddy and I know without a doubt that I am safe no matter what the situation.....maybe that is not the best thing though. If I HAD to dive with someone else would I expect them to take care of me as he does now.....I am not so sure I would get that from anyone else.

Could be a great "base" for you to stretch out from. Maybe learn to lead the dive, lead skill drills, or take a more advanced course. What a great day when you are every bit as good or better diver then your husband, and able to aid him and/or others.

Puffer Fish
11-01-2007, 05:14
but other than that, i will probably be babysitting you cuz i see you actin all wild ;)

Buddies range from a babysitting job to you all the way to you being the one being watched. As a relatively new diver, with very limited experience, you are making a giant, arrogant mistake in starting with the above attitude.

Diving is both a general skill and site specific. A Seal, for example, would have no reason to have drift diving skills, or lobster catching skills. Just as you today, don't need kelp skills.

I sure don't know if that guy was or was not military trained, but not catching lobster would not be the way to tell.

Having been thru the army's version of that training and worked with Seal's, I can tell you that none of their training relates to the type of dive you were doing.

I would suggest, that you look at it like this:

1. General diving skills, the important ones, are not something you can see on a specific dive. You will have no idea how skilled they are at handling an emergency (the really important part of being a buddy). Don't assume they are bad, don't assume they are good.

2. Do at least attempt to understand their experience level, only to the extent that it helps to understand how balanced the relationship is.

I dive with a lot of different people, sometimes new, sometimes new to an area but very experieced. I may be the one learning from them. Sometimes it is a babysitting job, sometimes I'm the one needed help with the environment.

I figure everyone I help out, help pay back the people that help me out.

Jim -NAUI #4186

scubarealtor
11-01-2007, 06:50
never had a truly bad dive buddy. i wonder if that means i'm the bad buddy? :)

Charlotte Smith
11-01-2007, 07:24
My husband is my dive buddy and I know without a doubt that I am safe no matter what the situation.....maybe that is not the best thing though. If I HAD to dive with someone else would I expect them to take care of me as he does now.....I am not so sure I would get that from anyone else.

Could be a great "base" for you to stretch out from. Maybe learn to lead the dive, lead skill drills, or take a more advanced course. What a great day when you are every bit as good or better diver then your husband, and able to aid him and/or others.
Unfortunately....I AM the better diver(probably because I never panic and don't scare easily), but just let him swim beside me watching me all of the time instead of keeping up with him, his air(he uses ALOT more), and his gear. I guess we just get comfortable with what we think is going to be there every time......but my eyes are open now...thanks for this thread....

Chad
11-01-2007, 10:32
but other than that, i will probably be babysitting you cuz i see you actin all wild ;)

As a relatively new diver, with very limited experience, you are making a giant, arrogant mistake in starting with the above attitude.



It's interesting how different people see things. I saw it as a light hearted quip, a tongue in cheek joke.

I saw it the same way. I mean he even used a winking smiley. ;)

Puffer Fish
11-01-2007, 18:11
but other than that, i will probably be babysitting you cuz i see you actin all wild ;)

As a relatively new diver, with very limited experience, you are making a giant, arrogant mistake in starting with the above attitude.



It's interesting how different people see things. I saw it as a light hearted quip, a tongue in cheek joke.

Sorry, I took it in the context of the rest of the post. Imagine you went diving with him, and got in his way, lost your knife... didn't have good trim... and you are now a "bad" diver. Sadly, I have seen that sort of judgement made on people that did not deserve it. (alone with some that did)

I took a very nice new diver (only had one or two hundred dives) out with a bunch of vets this last year... Divers who all had thousands of dives.. From the time he got on the boat, he was criticized, told he was doing something wrong... at one point, the captain told him he was swimming to the anchor wrong...he left hating them and it was that last dive he made.

I have made dives with some real jerks, or at least I thought they were at the time. But a real bad buddy is one that endangers you and/or himself. If your buddy refuses to give you air, when you are out... that is a bad buddy.

I will give him the part about trying to take his lobster.. that would upset me also...

Anyway, had the post been light hearted... I would have taken it that way... but understand, I'm a former military diver, and if that guy was really a SEAL, he needs to back off making fun of him. He could be and have all those terrible skills he pointed out. If the guy isn't, then the pretender needs to be straightened out as there are few lower forms of life.

SEAL's go thru training that no normal person could survive and do work, no normal person would want to do...

stranger
11-01-2007, 18:19
I'm no expert and far from a SEAL, but I find it hard to believe that a trained SEAL wouldn't be able to maintain proper buoyancy in a solid current.

But like I said, I could be completely off

Cojrock
11-01-2007, 18:24
My best dive buddy was my ex from england. She was an experienced instructor with many night and wreck penetration dives under her belt - I was very new to diving when we met so she taught me way more than i learned on my padi courses.

Worst dive buddy was a guide on a dive to 54m to visit the swimming pool of a wreck, he was bad cos he swam ahead with another diver leaving me with the other dive(an old lady) who started having trouble from being very narked(I took her hand and raised her 15 or so meters). Ive started doing alot of solo dives as id rather dive by myself unless i have a buddy i trust.

Puffer Fish
11-01-2007, 18:54
I'm no expert and far from a SEAL, but I find it hard to believe that a trained SEAL wouldn't be able to maintain proper buoyancy in a solid current.

But like I said, I could be completely off


I don't know the current training, but historically, it was never much of a concern. They are not being trained to protect a reef or look good.

And remember, military gear is not sport diving gear.

I know they use a lot of rebreathers today, but in my time it was military doubles..big, round heavy tanks. I know I could not go from diving with that gear and then switching to a BC, with a light suit and an AL80, and have anything approaching good control for a while.

However if you wanted someone to drag you through the water for a couple of miles, they would be who you would want.

Note: My longest ocean swim during that time was over 5 miles...I would be dead if I tried that today.

Puffer Fish
11-01-2007, 19:00
My best dive buddy was my ex from england. She was an experienced instructor with many night and wreck penetration dives under her belt - I was very new to diving when we met so she taught me way more than i learned on my padi courses.

Worst dive buddy was a guide on a dive to 54m to visit the swimming pool of a wreck, he was bad cos he swam ahead with another diver leaving me with the other dive(an old lady) who started having trouble from being very narked(I took her hand and raised her 15 or so meters). Ive started doing alot of solo dives as id rather dive by myself unless i have a buddy i trust.
That is a very sad situation, as some of the best parts of diving are sharing the experiences...I get to dive with a lot of new divers... and I know they are not going to be the best buddy, but watching them see something for the first time, or learning something new about themselves is also part of diving. I come prepared to dive solo... or rather as if I was diving solo and then don't worry about it.

Kokomo
11-01-2007, 19:21
My best buddy is my husband. He's the most fun to dive with and I feel safest when I am with him. Have also been with friends who were brand new to diving and friends who didn't have great bouyancy but that didn't really matter. I still enjoyed diving with them and knew they were very aware of me and their surroundings.

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
11-02-2007, 08:59
My worst buddy was a dive master candidate. I was supposed to follow a compass for one minute and then come back on the reciprocal. We surfaced 10 minutes later after he signals low on air. Everyone was freaked because we swam so far no one could see our bubbles. The instructor chewed him out pretty good. The DMC then blamed me for swimming so fast he couldn't keep up.

Instructor assigned an experienced DM to me who observed my kick. He said that I move at a pretty good clip but that I am not kicking particularly fast and that I must just have a naturally efficient kick. The rest of the class I tried to go very slow. I even resorted to a one fin kick at times.

cummings66
11-03-2007, 11:29
I can't say anything other than what's been said already, but I would say divers who move quickly fall towards the bad side with me. I like to go slow and see things, what's the point of diving if all I'm doing is an endurance event.

I believe in kick glide, kick glide, not kick kick kick kick. There's rarely a reason to get in a hurry, so that's why I put fast people under water in the bad category. They use more air, make me use more air, see fewer things and don't have as much fun.

My dive briefing includes this, we're going to move slow. You match my pace and stay to my side so I can look over and see you there. Don't hang above me, below me, or behind me. Don't make me look to find you, I want to know you're there on my right or left. Your choice.

Follow those rules and you're in the good buddy category, violate them and you're in the bad buddy category. Make me rescue you and you definitely are in the bad category. Make me have fun and we'll be friends for life.

RoadRacer1978
11-03-2007, 12:01
I can't say anything other than what's been said already, but I would say divers who move quickly fall towards the bad side with me. I like to go slow and see things, what's the point of diving if all I'm doing is an endurance event.

I believe in kick glide, kick glide, not kick kick kick kick. There's rarely a reason to get in a hurry, so that's why I put fast people under water in the bad category. They use more air, make me use more air, see fewer things and don't have as much fun.

My dive briefing includes this, we're going to move slow. You match my pace and stay to my side so I can look over and see you there. Don't hang above me, below me, or behind me. Don't make me look to find you, I want to know you're there on my right or left. Your choice.

Follow those rules and you're in the good buddy category, violate them and you're in the bad buddy category. Make me rescue you and you definitely are in the bad category. Make me have fun and we'll be friends for life.

That briefing would intimidate the crap out of me. :smiley29:

Puffer Fish
11-03-2007, 12:01
I can't say anything other than what's been said already, but I would say divers who move quickly fall towards the bad side with me. I like to go slow and see things, what's the point of diving if all I'm doing is an endurance event.

I believe in kick glide, kick glide, not kick kick kick kick. There's rarely a reason to get in a hurry, so that's why I put fast people under water in the bad category. They use more air, make me use more air, see fewer things and don't have as much fun.

My dive briefing includes this, we're going to move slow. You match my pace and stay to my side so I can look over and see you there. Don't hang above me, below me, or behind me. Don't make me look to find you, I want to know you're there on my right or left. Your choice.

Follow those rules and you're in the good buddy category, violate them and you're in the bad buddy category. Make me rescue you and you definitely are in the bad category. Make me have fun and we'll be friends for life.
We would not be very good buddies.. I dive whatever works for the dive... fast... slow.... picture taking and not moving...looking for lobster and covering miles...depending on the dive, my sac rate can be around .3 and as high a .55... depends.

I do agree with the being able to see the other diver... but sometimes I'm the one at fault. Did dives with a newer diver several weeks ago, and he was always behind me (I hate that)... after the dive, he explained he could not keep up (sorry... my fault).. next dive I slowed down to a pace he could do.

bubble-head
11-03-2007, 18:21
I've had more positive experiences than bad ones. This year I had one bad experience when a charter's dive master wanted to dive with my buddy and I. He ran out of air on the way up and shared air with me.

cummings66
11-03-2007, 19:11
I can go fast if need be, but why? I could see if you're just out hunting and need to get from point a to b, but other than that?

I have proved to many buddies over and over again that the slower we go the more territory we can cover. There's something like a course by a dam I dive near and if you go slow you can get there and back with air to spare, go fast and you'll be forced to come up early.

I like to cover ground, see new things and for me and most divers I've been with going slow gets us more territory. Now if you want to race I can match you speed wise but I'm going to use more than the .6 you have. I'd be more like a .9 doing a race, but that's how it is.

I'll say this is my belief, if you're a good buddy, and I one as well. When somebody lags behind we'd change pace to insure we don't get separated. If I noticed you slowing down I'd slow down, that type of thing. If you got fast I'd be there by your side, always there to help and share the fun.

I have only let one diver go off and leave me and that was after numerous dives with him and he not getting the buddy concept. I finally said heck with it, you want to go fast and not bother checking on where I'm at then have at it. He nearly got out of my sight before he realized I was gone. He learned after that to check on your buddy, make sure you know where they are.

WaScubaDude
11-04-2007, 23:08
snip..
My dive briefing includes this, we're going to move slow. You match my pace and stay to my side so I can look over and see you there. Don't hang above me, below me, or behind me. Don't make me look to find you, I want to know you're there on my right or left. Your choice. snip...

I find myself being the diver that is high and to the right (toward the deep side) to keep an eye on my DB and others. I appreciate your thoughtful comments. Makes me think it might be time to change up a bit.
Do you change your dive style/position relative to the experience of your DB?

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
11-09-2007, 15:31
Moving slow is good advice. Some of us just have to work more at it than others ;-)

It's much easier for me to follow than lead at this point. I like to fly in a wing man position.

WaScubaDude
12-20-2007, 16:23
Recently in Jamaica, I asked an insta buddy, How do you like to Buddy? Are we same ocean, or do you like to "hold hands?" He laughed and waved me off. Later he had a free flow and low air sit. and he ended up sharing air with me holding his tank valve. I had to laugh.

MConnelly2
12-30-2007, 23:34
Best buddy:
Being fairly new to this, with less than a couple dozen dives, there's only a few people I dive with. Travelling to nice warm places to dive on coral reefs and look at the pretty fishies just doesn't really interest me (maybe I'm just not a pretty fishy type of person), so I've never really dove with an 'insta-buddy'. I either dive with the guy who taught me to dive, runs the local dive shop here on Nantucket, The Sunken Ship (top notch outfit, by the way, and I have very high standards and don't give unwarranted praise), or I dive with one of the other guys from the station. Dive shop guy has been diving for longer than I've been alive, and the two guys at the station are both experienced Motor Lifeboatmen (they don't panic, don't get excited very easy, can count on them to calmly and rationally deal with anything that comes our way), both experienced divers, one of them into tech diving, but from Florida and not used to the cold. Still trying to kick with split fins in a drysuit with a bushel of scallops around his neck, not going anywhere fast nor easy. Other guys is also an experienced diver, and the best part - has gear to loan me as I slowly acquire my own. After this Christmas, all I need is gauges. Santa, wife, kids, and rest of family VERY good to me.

Worst buddy:
Would have to be me. The new guy. Very good about not kicking up silt, still not great with buoyancy control, don't have my weight nailed down yet (new 7mm 2 piece wetsuit I've only dove thrice, drysuit I've only dove once, and a brand new tank, a steel 100, that I haven't dove at all yet, so I'm still working down to the right amount of lead for me), and I've had trouble getting down on one dive [jokes about no rhythm/no soul/can't dance go here], and popped up once from about ten feet. Not sure what I did - all was good, and just starting floating up and couldn't stay down. BC was empty. Maybe just breathing too deep. So I'd say that, yup, at this point, I'm 'that guy', but that just makes my dive buddies that much better for having the patience to put up with me and help me out, make sure I'm progressing and learning the right way.

cummings66
01-02-2008, 19:16
Do you change your dive style/position relative to the experience of your DB?

Yes. In some conditions they lead or follow, it depends on the environment and their skills. I don't care if I lead or follow, but I do need to know where they are regardless of skill. If you've got the right light I can take you being in the position you seem to prefer, but if you have no light I don't like it. Do you know how uncomfortable it is to constantly have to turn and look around for your buddy because he's not in sight? It doesn't matter if you can see him, can he see you? That's what's important, each diver must know where the other is at all times in case of emergency. When I first started diving I had a buddy who liked to lag behind and above, once when I turned around to look he was gone. Turned out he had problems and went up without telling me, that's why I hate that position. I can't see something happen in realtime. By style if you mean deep or shallow I'd say yes, if you mean fast or slow then within reason I will modify it as well. The thing is we discuss it and stick to the plan we discuss. If you take off at warp speed and I have to struggle to keep up I will eventually be forced to let you go without me. I have done that one time and he deserved it. You do not leave your buddy, it goes two ways and what I give I expect in return, but the opposite can apply if it's able to be done safely. I will not put you in danger, and I will be there for you is my promise to any diver I go out with.

If you've got a light I can see and you move it properly then I know where you are and I'm fine with you being somewhere else. In the end don't make me look for you is what I ask of my buddies.

My best buddy is the one who saves me, the worst is the one who doesn't care I'm there.

You never know when a problem crops up. I had a blast diving this weekend, started one last dive but couldn't equalize and so we aborted it. I got home and hooked my regs up to a tank so I could clean them and lost the HP line immediately. While losing the HP line is the best thing to lose compared to a LP line, it would have been fun with a buddy who's gone missing at 110 feet deep. I don't like leaving a buddy at depth and I would have done so if I couldn't find you due to my problem.

DiveKwaj
01-04-2008, 23:27
I have to be pretty desperate to dive If I'm going to pair up with someone I don't know. Our local diving regulations require all visitors to go on a "check-out" dive with a scuba club member. So I see lots of people from all areas, experience levels and walks of life. A large percentage of the "certified" divers (in quotes because I use the term loosely) I have checked out are terrible divers who can't equalize, flail, have terrible bouancy control and I would view as a "threat" under other cirecumstances.

cutter77
01-05-2008, 00:37
My daughter was somewhat of a liability when first certified...but she's a definite asset now, and my best dive buddy.

jafo123
01-05-2008, 03:11
I dive mostly with my son. He's a good diver and getting better with every dive. I have to tell him after every dive that I want him shoulder to shoulder with all the time. (still worry about him you know, the parental thing.) He likes to be behind me and slightly above me so most of the time when I check on him I usualy end up having to roll over to see him. I always know where to find him but rolling over all the time gets me up set from time to time. Maybe this year will be different. Ha! Ha! Ha! You know how kids are!
I have dove with one old man once during a trainning class (I mean 80 years old) that dove like a rocket when he led the dive. I was quick to point out his diving to fast and he did understand and did slow down. In that he learned how much ground you can cover and still have more air left over. He was surprised. Guess you can teach old dogs new tricks!

cummings66
01-05-2008, 07:50
I have to be pretty desperate to dive If I'm going to pair up with someone I don't know.

I love to dive with new divers, but it's under controlled circumstances and never in the wild so to speak. I find that most divers after the OW course and before they actually get to do it on their own will be pretty rough around the edges and need some polish.

We do that at a local quarry and after a time we'll move on to the deeper quarry, then on to the wilds. It works fine and we both have a good time diving that way.

cheebaweebie
01-05-2008, 08:49
This post is interesting becuase last week I dove with a new diver (a guy I have known for years but just recently decided to go spearfishing with) and two other buddies. This one guy, who spoke a good game was obviously very inexperienced. He forgot his mask to begin with, carried a neumatic speargun and no stringer for fish(so if he shot one he reloaded the spear and swam around with the fish on the mono shock line connected to his gun). Trolling if you ask me. And he didn't like to touch fish (???) After borrowing a mask (my spare that was brought for one of the other divers) he waited till he dropped into the water before eputting it on becuase he said that if he put it on prior to getting into the water it fogged up on him (???). He borrowed one of the other guys fins becuase he hated his split fins (aeris) that he owned. After pulling the heel strap so tight on one of them, the pin popped out of the buckle assembly (which I had to fix for him) he decided to swim with one split fin and one regular fin. When we got back to the dock he did help off load the boat but did not help with the cleaning of the fish. Myself and the owner of the boat (a regular dive buddy of mine) wound up getting 9 grouper, 15 hogs and a few large mangrove snappers. The disfunctional diver shot 1 12" hog fish all day doing 3 full tank dives.
I had to speak my mind to my regular dive buddy when the disfunctional diver left.
Now for some one to talk so much trash about his diving and spearfishing abilities, It think or clearly know how far off base this guy was when it comes to the sport. I will not be inviting him on my boat to dive with me anytime soon that is for sure. He does still remain a friend but a dive buddy he id not !!!

cmburch
02-25-2008, 22:05
My worst dive buddies have been weak swimmers. The ones who surface in the middle of the kelp and flop around, or outside the kelp line and attempt to crawl over, or do not recognize that they are in the middle of a current and swim in place - instead of swimming outside the current. (They don't seem to notice difference in the angle of the kelp or are unfamiliar with rip tides, the tide going out, or swimming near the mouth of a river). I do not mind helping pull them down so they can swim under the kelp or pulling them out of or against the current. But if they continue to do it, I get tired physically. One of my worst dive buddies tore my reg out of my mouth when he was flailing his arms in large circular motions trying to back-up to look at a lobster. It was mainly that he did not notice what he had done. Probably thought my hose was just some kelp. My best dive buddies have similar skill and interests. Oh, I am probably most everyones worst dive buddy. I dart all over the place looking for fish. I may hang around one place for 5-10 min trying to get a good shot on a fish, and I suck up all my air early.

Hoffy
01-04-2009, 23:11
I have had a couple of shockers, one got a panic attack and bloody near drowned me, mostly though Ive had good buddies, my brother is great we have a good system and our dives are safe as, diving alone is BAD news, I never ever do it anymore as I'm 52 and not as strong as I used to be, age is a real factor, at 30 I could swim 10 miles easy but now mmmmm 3 is more like it, safety first, a bloke just got killed by a white here last week 2nd in 5 years, same shark we think, that's life.............

mksmith713
03-25-2009, 17:17
Ultimately, it's YOUR LIFE.
Depending on the dive, I prefer to dive without a buddy.
On deeper, more technical dives, i.e, wrecks or anything deeper than 110', I like to buddy up and stay close to each other.
On shallow, look at the pretty fishies type dives, I prefer to go solo.
I don't want to burden someone else with whatever issues I might have arise and I just like being free to do whatever I want to do while down,.
If I want to shoot 500 photos of a single resting reef shark, I think I should be able to.
If I were buddied up with someone, I'd feel pressured to move on to other things.

That's why I feel just fine slinging a small pony bottle and going solo.
As long as I have enough air to get me to the surface, I feel comfortable.