PDA

View Full Version : atom 2.0 vs. VT3



MxDiver
07-15-2007, 14:28
I currently own a mosquito and looking for a new computer which will allow me to use more than one mix, I will be taking my advanced nitrox class soon,I am strongly considering the VT3 and the atom 2.0, looking at the oceanic site and doing a comparison I can only come up with two differences, the digital watch functions and a 20 m. difference on operating depthin favor of the VT3.
Are these two basically the same computer? , or are there any substantial differences among them?
<DIV></DIV>

frankc420
07-15-2007, 18:48
I believe this was covered in a recent thread: http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=339&amp;KW=vt3 (http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=339&KW=vt3)

MxDiver
07-16-2007, 08:34
Yep, I didn't read that thread until after I posted this, "which wireless" is kind of a broad selection and did not ring a bell when posting.
<DIV>Regards.</DIV>

cummings66
07-16-2007, 11:07
My instructor I'm going to be taking the course from wants everything to be done by tables and not computer. Of course my VT3 will do it, but it won't matter for the course. Then again I'm going to be doing the Advanced Nitrox/Deco as part of the same course.
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>I don't think my computer would do the deco the same way as the tables the computer prints up however.</DIV>

Judestudio
07-16-2007, 17:28
Atom 2.0. I'm getting one soon. I like the look of it and that it doubles as a wrist watch.

Ajuva
07-17-2007, 16:05
Have the Atom 2.0 on air only at the moment but taking Nitrox course in 3 weeks.
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>I can't fault it at all on air though!</DIV>

Judestudio
07-18-2007, 20:53
This might be a silly question. But any comments on the color for Atom 2.0? The original silver or the rose-gold? I know it's a personal preference, I just wanna know what you think....

CompuDude
07-19-2007, 02:47
I'm a silver guy, myself. Goes with the rest of the outfit. ;-)

As for the original question, no, none of the computers you mentioned will be worth anything other than fancy bottom timers once you start cutting tables. They'll be great for the occasional recreational dive, however. ;-)

MxDiver
07-28-2007, 02:04
I'm a silver guy, myself. Goes with the rest of the outfit. ;-)

As for the original question, no, none of the computers you mentioned will be worth anything other than fancy bottom timers once you start cutting tables. They'll be great for the occasional recreational dive, however. ;-)

Care to elaborate?, Remember I haven't taken the advanced nitrox class yet. But according to the guidelines Diving is done down to 165 ft. Diving mix can contain up to 60% Oxigen, and decompresion gas up to 100% Oxigen. This seems something these computers can handle.
Don't get me wrong I know how important is to plan and use the tables, but saying the computers will not be worth anything other than fancy bottom timers is taking it a little to far, don't you agree?
Regards

CompuDude
07-28-2007, 09:18
I'm a silver guy, myself. Goes with the rest of the outfit. ;-)

As for the original question, no, none of the computers you mentioned will be worth anything other than fancy bottom timers once you start cutting tables. They'll be great for the occasional recreational dive, however. ;-)
Care to elaborate?, Remember I haven't taken the advanced nitrox class yet. But according to the guidelines Diving is done down to 165 ft. Diving mix can contain up to 60% Oxigen, and decompresion gas up to 100% Oxigen. This seems something these computers can handle.
Don't get me wrong I know how important is to plan and use the tables, but saying the computers will not be worth anything other than fancy bottom timers is taking it a little to far, don't you agree?
Regards
Not in this country... diving mixes tend to be up to 40%. Common deco gasses are 50%, 70% and 100%.

But going that deep you won't be using Nitrox, or if so, a very weak mix (under 28%). Getting into the merits of deep air diving, however, is beyond this thread, but suffice it to say I don't think it's a good idea. Beyond 130 I'd be looking into Trimix for all but the briefest of bounce dives.

Anytime you are on trimix or beyond the range of your computer (read: anything over recreational limits) you'll be cutting tables on land and using your computer in gauge mode, or it will lock you out. And using an expensive computer in gauge mode means you are getting the same functionality out of it as a simple bottom timer.

MxDiver
07-28-2007, 11:26
Not in this country... diving mixes tend to be up to 40%. Common deco gasses are 50%, 70% and 100%.
Maybe I was wrong in the use of the word "guidelines", so let me try to rephrase it. According to the DSAT Tec apprentice diver and Tec deep diver course brochures the use of enriched air for diving up to 60% oxygen, and the use of deco gasses up to 100% oxygen will be covered. I did not mean to imply actual dives will be carried with those percentages.


But going that deep you won't be using Nitrox, or if so, a very weak mix (under 28%). Getting into the merits of deep air diving, however, is beyond this thread, but suffice it to say I don't think it's a good idea. Beyond 130 I'd be looking into Trimix for all but the briefest of bounce dives.

Agreed, but I have to walk before I run, so I can't talk about trimix diving just yet. Quoting from the Tec Deep Diver brochure: "After successful completion of the Tec Deep Diver course, you'll be able to conduct gas-switch extended no-decompression dives, decompression dives and accelerated decompression dives using air and enriched air to a depth of 165 feet". As far as what mixes are the best suited for these dives I'll let you know after the course when I have the technical knowledge to further debate it.

Anytime you are on trimix or beyond the range of your computer (read: anything over recreational limits) you'll be cutting tables on land and using your computer in gauge mode, or it will lock you out. And using an expensive computer in gauge mode means you are getting the same functionality out of it as a simple bottom timer.
Since we were referring to my original question let's take trimix out of the equation, if trimix was in the mix I would be looking at a VR3. With that out of the way:
Recreational limit is 130 ft. these computers are capable of 330ft, at 165ft we are not beyond range of the computers but we are over recreational limits. Given these restrictions: max depth 165ft, no trimix, and two nitrox mixes (bottom mix up to 60%, deco gas up to 100% oxygen) can these computers be used as computers or will they become bottom timers?

CompuDude
07-30-2007, 13:09
Not in this country... diving mixes tend to be up to 40%. Common deco gasses are 50%, 70% and 100%.
Maybe I was wrong in the use of the word "guidelines", so let me try to rephrase it. According to the DSAT Tec apprentice diver and Tec deep diver course brochures the use of enriched air for diving up to 60% oxygen, and the use of deco gasses up to 100% oxygen will be covered. I did not mean to imply actual dives will be carried with those percentages.


But going that deep you won't be using Nitrox, or if so, a very weak mix (under 28%). Getting into the merits of deep air diving, however, is beyond this thread, but suffice it to say I don't think it's a good idea. Beyond 130 I'd be looking into Trimix for all but the briefest of bounce dives.

Agreed, but I have to walk before I run, so I can't talk about trimix diving just yet. Quoting from the Tec Deep Diver brochure: "After successful completion of the Tec Deep Diver course, you'll be able to conduct gas-switch extended no-decompression dives, decompression dives and accelerated decompression dives using air and enriched air to a depth of 165 feet". As far as what mixes are the best suited for these dives I'll let you know after the course when I have the technical knowledge to further debate it.

Anytime you are on trimix or beyond the range of your computer (read: anything over recreational limits) you'll be cutting tables on land and using your computer in gauge mode, or it will lock you out. And using an expensive computer in gauge mode means you are getting the same functionality out of it as a simple bottom timer.
Since we were referring to my original question let's take trimix out of the equation, if trimix was in the mix I would be looking at a VR3. With that out of the way:
Recreational limit is 130 ft. these computers are capable of 330ft, at 165ft we are not beyond range of the computers but we are over recreational limits. Given these restrictions: max depth 165ft, no trimix, and two nitrox mixes (bottom mix up to 60%, deco gas up to 100% oxygen) can these computers be used as computers or will they become bottom timers?

Well, your computer will work at 165, but in all likelihood, at those depths you will be cutting tables. I'm not overly familiar with PADI's DSAT deep diver course (beyond a general distaste for any program that promotes diving to 165' on air as a good thing), but I would hope they would introduce you to cutting tables with software rather than being dependent on a computer at that level. I've not been overly impressed with what I've seen of the DSAT courses, however. Beyond the recreational level, if I were you, I'd start looking into better-respected tech agencies like NAUI or GUE.

I'm not sure how many gases the specific models you're looking at can handle. My SmartTec can handle three mixes. One issue with using a recreational computer is the current models do not "predict" when you will be changing gases so they are likely to have inaccurate info on remaining bottom time, etc. while you are still on back gas, for instance. I think there are some models in the pipeline that will account for that, but I don't [I]think (but could be wrong) the current batch does. Essentially your computer will be wigging out until you switch gases, then it will recalculate things and quiet down.

Take this with a grain of salt and read the manuals, however, because again, I have not used recreational computers for planned deco dives with gas switches at this point. Everything that I have learned to date, however, has lead me to believe that when you're dealing with dives that far beyond rec limits, when using a rec computer, it will be in gauge mode. You can still switch gases (within the computer) but that's mostly for record-keeping and monitoring AI gas levels.

Only true deco computers like the VR3 handle the advanced planning and gas switching aspects of dives at this level. And even then it is debatable whether you will want to be dependent on a computer. I know many advanced divers (in the true sense of the word) who will bring an advanced computer like a VR3 along for the ride, but the actual dive is conducted working from tables.

cummings66
07-30-2007, 19:07
Even the divers I have run into with the VR3 seem to use cut tables, odd considering the expense of the thing.

MxDiver
07-30-2007, 19:19
First off I like to thank you, as you got me thinking about things I hadn’t considered, which will help me make a better choice.

Regarding training so far what I found available is PADI and IANTD. Cost is pretty much the same for either course US$1000.00 plus minus a couple hundred. I haven’t looked into other options, I will see if there is more available. I think there are some GUE courses available in Coz.

As you mentioned, I expect to be taught how to cut tables, and I expect to be able to plan my dives on tables, and then use the computer as a tool to follow my plan, not the other way around; nevertheless I would like to pick the best tool for the job.

Two of the computers I am looking at right now are the Oceanic VT-3 and the NitekDuo. After what you wrote I don’t know if they are the best choice for me. I’m in no rush to buy the new computer, and it will probably be 4 to 5 months before I do, but I like to get an early start on my homework and increase my chances at getting the right computer the first time, well second time if you consider I purchased the mosquito on a whim.

Which computers would you recommend, or think I should take a look at?

Regards.