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View Full Version : Do tank O rings need grease?



davieeeee
10-01-2007, 00:47
I know this is a really silly question, but I just wanted to know as I have just bought my first tank.. Do the o-rings need to be greased before putting them on? I am referring to the o ring that is visible when looking at the valve, and this is for a yoke set up, if that makes any difference. Also, I've already had two O rings give way on me (out of the water luckily). How common is it for o rings to bust? Am I just very unlucky?
Thanks for helping out a noob =)

paintsnow
10-01-2007, 01:28
do you have regulators already?
if not i would suggest getting a DIN fitting and changing your valves.
its inexpensive and the o ring is much more secure.

and the o rings should not be greased. the reason for this is that if they are greased they will attract and hold lint, dust, sand and any other particles, which could very well prevent a good seal.

with a DIN valve there is no o ring present on the tank, which is the one piece of equipment that usually gets the most abuse and is usually stored in the worst environments for o rings. instead the o ring is on the regulator, which most people take care of much better.

if you already have a yoke reg you can find out about converting it to DIN if you are interested.

also DIN has the ability to be used on any valve on any scuba tank.
some places overseas use only DIN valves, so you would have to rent regs if you own yoke, other places use only yoke, in which case you screw on your DIN to yoke adapter and you have yourself a yoke reg in 3 seconds.

keyshunter
10-01-2007, 05:24
I know this is a really silly question, but I just wanted to know as I have just bought my first tank.. Do the o-rings need to be greased before putting them on? I am referring to the o ring that is visible when looking at the valve, and this is for a yoke set up, if that makes any difference. Also, I've already had two O rings give way on me (out of the water luckily). How common is it for o rings to bust? Am I just very unlucky?
Thanks for helping out a noob =)

It is not necessary to grease the yoke valve o-ring. It is not really common for properly sized, new o-rings to blow. There are two different thicknesses (at least) of o-rings that will fit a standard K valve. Perhaps you need the other one. Or, there could be a problem with your new valve's face, or for that matter, your reg's.

keyshunter
10-01-2007, 05:42
Paintsnow,
You are wise beyond your years.

When I taught at the college level, I usually told my students before a bluebook (essay) exam: "If you don't know the answer to the question, tell me what you do know about the subject. Maybe I will give you partial credit."

FishFood
10-01-2007, 07:22
Make sure you let all the pressure out of the regs after turning off the air in the tank. That seems to be a common mistake that will easily blow an oring.

mm_dm
10-01-2007, 07:44
Make sure you let all the pressure out of the regs after turning off the air in the tank. That seems to be a common mistake that will easily blow an oring.


Good point. Be sure to inspect the o-ring before you hook up the regulator and see if the o-ring was damaged during the fill.

thesmoothdome
10-01-2007, 08:23
As was already said, no you don't need to grease the o-ring on the valve. You should inspect the o-ring before you hook you're reg up to it thoiugh. If it seems frayed or compressed, replace it before the problem occurs. Everyone should carry a save-a-dive kit complete with tank o-rings. IMHO, switching all your gear to DIN because of the higher possibility of blowing an o-ring is overkill. It's akin to being so germ-a-phobic that you live your life in a plastic bubble to avoid the common cold. Blown o-rings happen occassionally, but if you inspect them and change them when need be, it's not very likely.

TxHockeyGuy
10-01-2007, 19:33
I was having the same problem with o-rings blowing on me. Only I had one blow at depth, an experience I didn't care for. Nothing appeared to be wrong with the regulator, the o-rings I was using, or the valve. I was tired of having them go out on me (4 in 8 dives) and went with the shotgun approach. I changed o-rings and replaced the valve on the one tank that kept losing the o-rings, so far so good.

Are you constantly losing them on the same tank? Has the tank ever been tipped over with the reg still on it hitting the ground? There might be a scratch or the yoke may have been slightly bent not fully capturing that o-ring. Just some thoughts.

paintsnow
10-01-2007, 21:12
As was already said, no you don't need to grease the o-ring on the valve. You should inspect the o-ring before you hook you're reg up to it thoiugh. If it seems frayed or compressed, replace it before the problem occurs. Everyone should carry a save-a-dive kit complete with tank o-rings. IMHO, switching all your gear to DIN because of the higher possibility of blowing an o-ring is overkill. It's akin to being so germ-a-phobic that you live your life in a plastic bubble to avoid the common cold. Blown o-rings happen occassionally, but if you inspect them and change them when need be, it's not very likely.


it might be overkill in some cases but to me its peace of mind.

also, thank you keyshuner, im obsessed with scuba and its all i can think about
XD

davieeeee
10-02-2007, 21:53
Thanks for the informative reply guys!

"Make sure you let all the pressure out of the regs after turning off the air in the tank. That seems to be a common mistake that will easily blow an oring."

Thats an interesting comment and one that I might be guilty of.

My current procedure is to.
a. Close the tank valve complete.
b. Purge both regs.
c. Dissassemble reg from tank

Am I doing this incorrectly?

FishFood
10-02-2007, 21:59
Yep^^

Finger tighten the tank valve. Then drain the air out. (one reg is fine, two wont hurt anything)

Now, even after the air stops hissing, theres some still left in. So make sure youve let it ALL out. (looking at your gauge is a good way to tell...)

There shouldnt be a pop or any noise when you take your first stage off the tank valve.

EDIT:

Also, Dont tighten the first stange to the tank valve very much. Two finger tight is all thats needed. The air pressure will keep it on.

TxHockeyGuy
10-02-2007, 23:17
Thanks for the informative reply guys!

"Make sure you let all the pressure out of the regs after turning off the air in the tank. That seems to be a common mistake that will easily blow an oring."

Thats an interesting comment and one that I might be guilty of.

My current procedure is to.
a. Close the tank valve complete.
b. Purge both regs.
c. Dissassemble reg from tank

Am I doing this incorrectly?

Purging a single second stage is sufficient to remove pressure between the tank and a regulator after turning the tank off, purging the second regulator is overkill. If you hear no sound when you start to disassemble your regulator from the tank, you successfully purged all air from you regulator and this is not the problem.

ScaredSilly
10-03-2007, 15:02
When I taught at the college level, I usually told my students before a bluebook (essay) exam: "If you don't know the answer to the question, tell me what you do know about the subject. Maybe I will give you partial credit."


OT - I had a Prof who added to that. However, if you write something that is wrong I will take off points. As such, it was possible to get a negative score on his tests. The moral - write what you are sure off and not to guess.

datamunk
10-05-2007, 20:30
there could be a bend in the skirt of where the oring goes, that when it is pressured up it could kinda pinch it a little.

easy thing to do is just keep a stock of orings on ya.. i think they are size 012 or 013? when people would come in and ask for them id give em about 10 or 15 for free (instead of the measly $0.10 or whatever per ring)

dont lube just stick it in as best as ya can, put a reg on and secure it.

DINS ARE nicer but, up to you.

you can buy these lil key rings at dive shops that look like a scuba tank that have a bunch of orings inside... or what i used to do is get a zip tie, put them on and put the ziptie "locked" backwards, meaning, do it upside down and you can pull the pieces apart... holds them all together nicely!