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Ash0r
10-01-2007, 21:22
How does one judge the quality of a regulator other than price? :confused: It seems like there are few differences in features, but a large difference in price.

Is there a standard metric for measuring the capabilities of a regulator or is it solely based on price and peoples opinions? :dunno:

ScubaToys Larry
10-01-2007, 21:26
A few things will determine price - and quality. Some is features. A reg with an adjustment knob will be more than the same reg without. Example a Zeagle Envoy Deluxe is more than an Envoy.

But the big thing on regs is something called WOB. Work of breathing.

This thread might help: http://forum.scubatoys.com/showthread.php?t=3429&highlight=wob

DevilDiver
10-01-2007, 21:37
Scuba Diving Magazine rates new regulators every year in their magazine. Eveyone has opinions baased on what gear they purchased or what they or thier buddies have used.
The Scuba Lab report give actual statistics based on test. The ergonomic results are based on what the test divers thoughts were on feel, bubble interference and such. The ANSTI breathing scores are based on preformance at depth and breathing rate. You can take the ergonomic results with a grain of salt because these are opinions, the ANSTI results are pretty much factual.............

Here is the link to this years scores. You can search previous years if you are looking for an older model. :smiley20:

http://www.scubadiving.com/gear/regulators/new_regs_for_2007

Ash0r
10-02-2007, 00:21
Is there any one place you can go to get all the ANSTI results? :smiley_afro:

DevilDiver
10-02-2007, 06:34
I believe the Navy runs test as well but I would not have a clue on how to get thie info or what format it would be in............Sorry.

ccarter
10-02-2007, 08:19
A few things will determine price - and quality. Some is features. A reg with an adjustment knob will be more than the same reg without. Example a Zeagle Envoy Deluxe is more than an Envoy.

But the big thing on regs is something called WOB. Work of breathing.

This thread might help: http://forum.scubatoys.com/showthread.php?t=3429&highlight=wob
That was a good/educational read.. thanks for linking that!:smiley20:

awap
10-02-2007, 12:17
While WOB is clearly an important consideration in overall quality, the fact is that there are lots of regulators with perfectly acceptable WOB numbers for recreational diving. The combination of a number of unquantified parameters is probably more important than relatively small differences in WOB. You need to also consider things like reliability, durability, supportability and performance under various specific conditions. Then look at your specific situation and needs to address things like comfort and access to support. For many divers, the biggest difference between the Envoy and the Envoy Delux is their cost.

txmntman
10-02-2007, 12:38
Many folks will tell you that what "they" dive with is the best there is, and I hope they really do think that. Another thought is how long they have dove with that regulator (or any piece of gear) as that would be a great indication of really how well they like it. Any problems, and they will change it out....
That being said, I bought an Oceanic Omega regulator in 1985 (or '84 or '86...can't remember), and I still use it today. It has been durable, wonderfully easy to breathe, and I've never had a problem. I keep it serviced, and it keeps me happy....so, another answer to your question as to the best regulator, is one that people keep for years, not just the newest "kid on the block"....just a thought...

Ash0r
10-02-2007, 15:09
Someone else mentioned in another thread that a joules measurement is an incredibly small measurement. What sort of difference in joules rating do you think you could notice?

Would there be a noticeable difference between something that had a WOB of 1.00 and 1.40?

What sort of WOB rating is noticeably difficult to breathe at?

Thanks!
:samurai:

awap
10-02-2007, 15:54
Someone else mentioned in another thread that a joules measurement is an incredibly small measurement. What sort of difference in joules rating do you think you could notice?

Would there be a noticeable difference between something that had a WOB of 1.00 and 1.40?

What sort of WOB rating is noticeably difficult to breathe at?

Thanks!
:samurai:

I doubt if many can answer that as few, if any, diver know what the WOB is for their reg. It will vary not just model to model but even sample to sample for a given model.

I do have a sense for how my regs are behaving in terms of cracking pressure - how much effort it takes to get gas flow started. I usually tune my regs to about 1.0 inches +/- about 0.2 and can detect when it slips into the 1.5 to 2.0 inch range.

Another problem with WOB is that positive pressure breathers, which some divers find to be very uncomfortable, have an advantage in the measure.

subsur
10-02-2007, 20:08
scubadiving magazine often test new regulators and compare them side by side. I want to believe it's inbiased but i'm a bit skeptical about reviews in a commercial magazine. There is another european site where they like to test regs in various environments (sorry i forgot the URL). you should use this board or scubaboard to ask people. you will most likely get plenty of responses just filter BS out (like - X is best because I dive it).

CaribbeanDiver
10-06-2007, 09:06
call me simple minded but I do not like regs with the dials on them. I believe most just set it once and never touch it again anyway. I want my reg giving me full vol all the time, why would I want to turn it down?
The only reason I can think of is to keep it from freeflowing but frankly, if I had a reg with a free flowing problem, I would change regs. I have enough to think about with worrying whether my precious gas is blowing out due to some equipment malfunction.
Good to know the WOB though, I was unaware of that criteria of measuring performance. You can bet next reg I buy, I am checking.

awap
10-06-2007, 11:32
call me simple minded but I do not like regs with the dials on them. I believe most just set it once and never touch it again anyway. I want my reg giving me full vol all the time, why would I want to turn it down?
The only reason I can think of is to keep it from freeflowing but frankly, if I had a reg with a free flowing problem, I would change regs. I have enough to think about with worrying whether my precious gas is blowing out due to some equipment malfunction.
Good to know the WOP though, I was unaware of that criteria of measuring performance. You can bet next reg I buy, I am checking.

Both my primary and secondary are adjustable and I turn one or both down for every dive.

I always turn my secondary down a bit so it does not freeflow when not in use. In this way, I can keep it tuned like my primary rather than detuning it as is done with most octos. But when I use it, I can have it breath as easily as a primary.

I dive older BP 1sts so the balancing still leaves a little IP decrease as tank pressure falls. I usually detune it for entry and descent and then open it back up at depth.

I keep my primaries tuned on the hot side (cracking pressure less than 1 inch) so I sometimes have to detune a bit when tank pressure is high and open it up as pressure falls.

I detune my primary for surf entries.

I detune my primary when diving into a current. It does not take much current to cause freeflow when you face into it.

But if you just set up your reg up so it is a little harder breathing all the time, you probably will not need to use any adjustment.

in_cavediver
10-06-2007, 17:04
Here's a good biased opinion of how to tell a good reg from a bad one - look at what the top divers use in the area you want to dive. IE, cold water wreck divers = look at their preference. An interesting thing will crop up. Lots of 'top' divers don't use the 'top' or 'greatest' regs out there. I sure don't. I use simpler reliable high performance regs.

Here's the best part. As a rec diver, staying above 130. I doubt you could tell the difference between most quality regs. I know I couldn't tell much difference between a Zeagle Flathead 6 and a Dive Rite RG 2500 at 200'. Both worked admirably. Get what you like and be happy!

telmnstr
10-13-2007, 16:49
Hey everyone, I can say that that if things aren't right, after some time you can feel it in the back of your throat or stomach. It will tire you out a bit if you have to work hard breathing. I have a older double hose regulator and on it's maiden voyage I had the tank sitting a bit low. With the double hose regulator, the breathing pressure is set by the regulator which is on your back and not in front of your mouth. So with it sitting wrong, the breathing pressure proper. It got tiresome after a while and I wanted the dive to end.

If things are closer to proper you may not have as bad of an experience.

With the double hose setup, a fun thing is you can roll over and then it goes over pressure a bit. Chipmunk cheeks!

Even though it might *seem* like a fun idea to roll over and remove your mask, and let it free flow out of your nose..... yea, I wouldn't recommend trying it. It didn't work as well as planned.