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Venio
10-02-2007, 08:31
Could someone that have taken or even passed :smiley20: this course to give some more inside on what to expect from it. I would love to take it the near future.

Thanks.

kobalap
10-02-2007, 10:01
Could someone that have taken or even passed :smiley20: this course to give some more inside on what to expect from it. I would love to take it the near future.

Thanks.

Venio,

GUE has a complete outline on what this class is about. Have you had a chance to read through it? Below is a copy and paste of a portion of the outline:
---------
Academic Topics

1. GUE organization
2. Why DIR Fundamentals?
3. Diving proficiency
4. Buoyancy and trim
5. Streamlining and equipment configuration
6. Propulsion techniques
7. Situational awareness
8. Communication
9. Breathing gas overview
10. Dive planning and gas management
11. Diver preparedness

Land Drills & Topics

1. Dive team protocols
2. S-drill and valve-drill
3. Equipment fit and function
4. Propulsion techniques
5. Pre-dive drills
6. Surface marker deployment
------

The class has two audiences. First is the purely recreational diver just looking to increase proficiency and skill. The second is the diver who looking to advance in GUE's training program (tech and/or cave). Both will get knowledge and show the skills that GUE believes will increase both fun and safety in diving.

There is a feedback mechanism built into the class. In other words, during the class, you will get suggestions on areas of improvement. If you sufficiently improve during the course of the class, the instructor will tell if you have met the bar you are trying to reach (rec pass or tech pass depending). If you have not, the instructor will tell you the areas that you should continue to work on. Divers looking to move forward in GUE's training program will then have to go back to the instructor and ask for a re-eval at some point in the future as the tech pass (or tech rating) is required to get into GUE's Cave 1 or Tech 1 classes. Recreational diver may choose to go back for a re-eval just to get feedback if he or she sees some personal benefit.

There are a lot of different aspects to the class so maybe you could elaborate on what you are looking for?

Venio
10-02-2007, 10:44
I definitely want to continue on the Tech/Cave track. What is the difference between rec pass and tech pass?

I'm also looking for DIR divers in the DFW area that are willing to dive with me. I am currently taking Intro to Tech with a NAUI instructor in my university. So if there is anyone interested please post here or PM me.

Thanks.

kobalap
10-02-2007, 15:13
Venio,

The difference between a rec pass and a tech pass is pretty well covered in the
standards and procedures paper (http://www.gue.com/Training/Standards/GUE_Standards_2006_ver4.pdf) from the GUE website.

Some high level points:
- The material covered for both the recreational program and the technical program are largely the same. In other words, you learn the some procedures either way.
- Cave diving and Tech diving are significantly more complex and require additional equipment to execute properly. For example, both type of diving require significant gas reserves in case of emergencies. As such, divers looking to get the tech pass or tech rating will be required to go through the class with the typical equipment used in cave or tech diving. In GUE, this means having a canister light and doubles. Recreational diving does not have a need for this equipment. As such, divers looking to get the recreational pass will only be required to do the class in a single tank. The diver has the option to do the class in doubles and with a canister light even if he/she is only going for the recreational pass.
- Cave diving and tech diving requires significantly more skill execute. As such, the level of proficiency required to get a tech pass is slightly higher than the bar for recreational pass.

I would like to offer a little bit of unsolicited advice here..

If your profile is correct (<25 dives), I wouldn't even bother thinking about rec pass vs. tech pass. In fact, I wouldn't even think about the evaluation. Just focus on the learning. The most important thing about the fundies class is the education. At less than 25 dives, you are likely many many moons away from pursuing any type of tech diving anyway so to set your focus on a tech pass might actually detract from the more important part of the class.

Venio
10-02-2007, 16:06
Venio,

The difference between a rec pass and a tech pass is pretty well covered in the
standards and procedures paper (http://www.gue.com/Training/Standards/GUE_Standards_2006_ver4.pdf) from the GUE website.

Some high level points:
- The material covered for both the recreational program and the technical program are largely the same. In other words, you learn the some procedures either way.
- Cave diving and Tech diving are significantly more complex and require additional equipment to execute properly. For example, both type of diving require significant gas reserves in case of emergencies. As such, divers looking to get the tech pass or tech rating will be required to go through the class with the typical equipment used in cave or tech diving. In GUE, this means having a canister light and doubles. Recreational diving does not have a need for this equipment. As such, divers looking to get the recreational pass will only be required to do the class in a single tank. The diver has the option to do the class in doubles and with a canister light even if he/she is only going for the recreational pass.
- Cave diving and tech diving requires significantly more skill execute. As such, the level of proficiency required to get a tech pass is slightly higher than the bar for recreational pass.

I would like to offer a little bit of unsolicited advice here..

If your profile is correct (<25 dives), I wouldn't even bother thinking about rec pass vs. tech pass. In fact, I wouldn't even think about the evaluation. Just focus on the learning. The most important thing about the fundies class is the education. At less than 25 dives, you are likely many many moons away from pursuing any type of tech diving anyway so to set your focus on a tech pass might actually detract from the more important part of the class.

Now, the number of my dives should not be considered as a merit of my skills. In fact in my not so long carrier as a diver I've seen quite few divers experienced in term of a number of dives that are not that good ether with their buoyancy or ability to work and dive in bad conditions. For example, this past weekend I was at PK where my instructor in Intro to Tech (he already had the same argument as you that my dives were not enough but changed his opinion in half an hour pool session) assigned my to dive with a DM for my first dive. The DM was so confused of the poor vis ~5 ft. that he was nether able to control his depth, bouncing like a rubber ball from 60 to 25 feet depth, nor able to maintain straight line without a visual marker, not sure he new how to use the compass since we were diving in circle the whole time. After few unsuccessful attempts on his side to find the platform, I went ahead and led. I got there from the first attempt and was leading to the sore from there when he as a following buddy lost me.

The reason I wrote all that is that there is no way you can evaluate my skills and ability to complete the DIR-F over the net. If that was so the class would have been taught and graded online ;).

Thanks for the useful link and quotations.

jo8243
10-02-2007, 16:20
caves = death.

Venio
10-02-2007, 16:26
caves = death.

Hmmm... interesting thought!

Now in your line of thoughts.

beds = death.

So many people had have their final moments in their bads. Must be a dangerous place. :smiley36:

CompuDude
10-02-2007, 16:32
Now, the number of my dives should not be considered as a merit of my skills.

I agree, but there is merit in racking up some more dives before taking the class. I would consider around 100 dives to be the point at which a diver will be ready, but obviously this varies from individual to individual.

Buoyancy and the ability to maintain composure and trim while task loaded are the most important things you should have nailed down before taking the class. If you're struggling AT ALL with your buoyancy, you'll be spending far too much time working on that to get as much as you otherwise could from the class.

The difference between tech and rec passes are intent and gear, and the standards to which you will be held. For a tech pass, your allowed buoyancy swing during tasks will be considerably smaller, trim variance allowable will be smaller, ALL of your kicks will need to be working, not just basically on the right path, and you'll need to take the class in a drysuit, with doubles and a canister light.

ccarter
10-02-2007, 16:40
Now, the number of my dives should not be considered as a merit of my skills.

I agree, but there is merit in racking up some more dives before taking the class. I would consider around 100 dives to be the point at which a diver will be ready, but obviously this varies from individual to individual.

Buoyancy and the ability to maintain composure and trim while task loaded are the most important things you should have nailed down before taking the class. If you're struggling AT ALL with your buoyancy, you'll be spending far too much time working on that to get as much as you otherwise could from the class. Though I guess Tech diving has a "cooler" aspect to it compared to vacationish reef diving..

I've already got a strange/crazy/cool hobby in enduro-mountain biking though and that costs enough as it is..

The difference between tech and rec passes are intent and gear, and the standards to which you will be held. For a tech pass, your allowed buoyancy swing during tasks will be considerably smaller, trim variance allowable will be smaller, ALL of your kicks will need to be working, not just basically on the right path, and you'll need to take the class in a drysuit, with doubles and a canister light.
Personally not a tech diver so I prolly shouldn't even reply but that was well said. When I first got certified I thought I was the shiznit also.. I think most of us do to some extent. I was definitely safer/calmer than the people that instructed me as they were a wee bit unsafe (attempted to take me to ~135ft on ~35% nitrox, randomly went down wrong anchor lines and etc). I used to want to take DM.. Cavern.. whole bunch of classes as quick as I could but eventually just settled in and enjoyed the ride. I've found I much prefer the photography aspect of diving more than anything and would rather be on a reef in a warm tropical ocean than in a cavern of a spring. Though I guess there is a "cooler" aspect to tech diving when compared to vacationish reef diving.

I've already got a strange/crazy/cool hobby in enduro-mountain biking though and that kills my body/mind/wallet enough as it is.

kobalap
10-02-2007, 16:46
Now, the number of my dives should not be considered as a merit of my skills. In fact in my not so long carrier as a diver I've seen quite few divers experienced in term of a number of dives that are not that good ether with their buoyancy or ability to work and dive in bad conditions. For example, this past weekend I was at PK where my instructor in Intro to Tech (he already had the same argument as you that my dives were not enough but changed his opinion in half an hour pool session) assigned my to dive with a DM for my first dive. The DM was so confused of the poor vis ~5 ft. that he was nether able to control his depth, bouncing like a rubber ball from 60 to 25 feet depth, nor able to maintain straight line without a visual marker, not sure he new how to use the compass since we were diving in circle the whole time. After few unsuccessful attempts on his side to find the platform, I went ahead and led. I got there from the first attempt and was leading to the sore from there when he as a following buddy lost me.

The reason I wrote all that is that there is no way you can evaluate my skills and ability to complete the DIR-F over the net. If that was so the class would have been taught and graded online ;).

Thanks for the useful link and quotations.

Ah, you know what they say about advice - wise men don't need it and fools won't heed it.

Edit: I just re-read what you wrote here. I think you were trying to say that you had a career as a diver previously?

Anyway, no one is judging your ability to complete the class. The point I am making is that most of the people I have talked to focus on the evaluation. Which really gets in the way of learning. I always tell anybody who asks - when you take fundies (or cave 1 or tech 1), focus on getting the learning in. The pass/fail thing will take care of itself in due time.

Venio
10-02-2007, 16:47
Now, the number of my dives should not be considered as a merit of my skills.

I agree, but there is merit in racking up some more dives before taking the class. I would consider around 100 dives to be the point at which a diver will be ready, but obviously this varies from individual to individual.

Buoyancy and the ability to maintain composure and trim while task loaded are the most important things you should have nailed down before taking the class. If you're struggling AT ALL with your buoyancy, you'll be spending far too much time working on that to get as much as you otherwise could from the class.

The difference between tech and rec passes are intent and gear, and the standards to which you will be held. For a tech pass, your allowed buoyancy swing during tasks will be considerably smaller, trim variance allowable will be smaller, ALL of your kicks will need to be working, not just basically on the right path, and you'll need to take the class in a drysuit, with doubles and a canister light.

As I've stated on numerous times I'm in Intro to Tech where I do shoot bag in horizontal position, use frog kick, modified frog kick and helicopter turn. I have done s-drills and v-drills, for now only with an H-valve steel HP 120. The only thing I've not used is dry suit. I was not aware it's required for the DIR-F tech pass and canister light. BTW, I was not planing to go get the fundies this coming weekend. I was just trying to get enough info and find DIR diver in the DFW area so I can dive with them and get a better response on how my skills are developing, where do I need to stress more and so on. all thing that one cannot get over the forum.

kobalap
10-02-2007, 16:55
Now, the number of my dives should not be considered as a merit of my skills.
I agree, but there is merit in racking up some more dives before taking the class. I would consider around 100 dives to be the point at which a diver will be ready, but obviously this varies from individual to individual.


Which class? Tech 1/Cave 1 or Fundies?

For Tech 1/Cave 1, we don't even need to bother stating minimum number of dives. The pre-requisite of tech rating from fundies will pretty much weed out the folks who aren't ready.

For Fundies, I personally feel like most open water divers could benefit by taking the class right out of the gate for the following reasons:

- They get to see an alternate (and perhaps better) way to do gas sharing.
- They get to learn real gas planning as opposed to "back in the boat with 500psi" (I don't really know what most teachers teach but this is what I was taught in my open water class)
- They get to see alternate propulsion techniques
- They get to see "proper" trim as defined by GUE
- They get to learn about the GUE gear configuration before they invest thousands in "traditional" recreational gear
- They get to learn about GUE style diving from a qualified instructor (as opposed to a bunch of strangers from the internet)

The class is a struggle either way, particularly with the tech rating requirements. Why wait and learn a bunch of stuff that you might have to "unlearn" later?

in_cavediver
10-02-2007, 17:04
I can't comment directly on the fundies class since I haven't taken it. I will comment on the best means to prepare for tech diving though as I got to watch my wife go through it.

First, number of dives has some meaning but its not the be all end all either. It should be noted though that less dives means less expierence and it doesn't matter how good your skills are, expierence is still needed.

Now, for expierence. There is a big difference in diving with a bunch of tech/cave divers regularly and diving with any old vacation diver if your goal is in tec/cave. Diving with those who do it will surely humble even the more arrogant OW diver. I had advanced nitrox, friend tec nitrox when we started cave training and our instructor made us look like rote amatuers. This is a GOOD thing. It raises the bar. Its hard to know where to go without some examples.

So I say, if your interested in fundies - take it. Screw the tec-pass/rec-pass idea/details and go for the information. Who knows, you may end up with other agencies because you like thier philosophies better. (I do personally). You'll still be a better diver for going through the GUE class.

And Lastly for the 'Caves=death' comment. You'll dead on. Stay out of them (its nicer with less people around)

kobalap
10-02-2007, 17:05
As I've stated on numerous times I'm in Intro to Tech where I do shoot bag in horizontal position, use frog kick, modified frog kick and helicopter turn. I have done s-drills and v-drills, for now only with an H-valve steel HP 120. The only thing I've not used is dry suit. I was not aware it's required for the DIR-F tech pass and canister light. BTW, I was not planing to go get the fundies this coming weekend. I was just trying to get enough info and find DIR diver in the DFW area so I can dive with them and get a better response on how my skills are developing, where do I need to stress more and so on. all thing that one cannot get over the forum.

Venio,

I think if you ask 5 different people about when to take fundies, you might get 5 different answers. I have stated my opinion on it so take that for whatever it is worth. Another good idea is to talk to a GUE instructor and get their advice on it.

Venio
10-02-2007, 17:18
As I've stated on numerous times I'm in Intro to Tech where I do shoot bag in horizontal position, use frog kick, modified frog kick and helicopter turn. I have done s-drills and v-drills, for now only with an H-valve steel HP 120. The only thing I've not used is dry suit. I was not aware it's required for the DIR-F tech pass and canister light. BTW, I was not planing to go get the fundies this coming weekend. I was just trying to get enough info and find DIR diver in the DFW area so I can dive with them and get a better response on how my skills are developing, where do I need to stress more and so on. all thing that one cannot get over the forum.

Venio,

I think if you ask 5 different people about when to take fundies, you might get 5 different answers. I have stated my opinion on it so take that for whatever it is worth. Another good idea is to talk to a GUE instructor and get their advice on it.

What I really want is to get in touch with some DIR divers from my area. Apparently they enter not dwell in this forum or there are none in the the area. Hope I'm wrong in both.

One of the problems in DIR-F is that there are no instructors/classes in the Great State of Texas. So I'll have to get on a trip just for the class. Then if I got provisional I'll have to go back on a trip to get passed. I'll try my best to get as much prepared for the class before I even talk to instructor about taking it, because I don't really want to get on a second trip plus I hate to not pass things, just my ego of a rocket scientist.

Venio
10-02-2007, 17:29
... and you'll need to take the class in a drysuit...

Could someone confirm on that. I was just reading the required equipment list in the GUE Standards but I didn't find anything about drysuit. It only mentions doubles and canister light for the tech pass.

kobalap
10-02-2007, 18:14
What I really want is to get in touch with some DIR divers from my area. Apparently they enter not dwell in this forum or there are none in the the area. Hope I'm wrong in both.

I might know someone. Give me a few days to look into it.



One of the problems in DIR-F is that there are no instructors/classes in the Great State of Texas. So I'll have to get on a trip just for the class. Then if I got provisional I'll have to go back on a trip to get passed. I'll try my best to get as much prepared for the class before I even talk to instructor about taking it, because I don't really want to get on a second trip plus I hate to not pass things, just my ego of a rocket scientist.

I tell you, every single person I talk to about fundies has the same mentality. Gotta pass it the first time around. I think that sets you up for a couple of pitfalls. Not the least of which is that you might wind up learning to do it in a way that is different than what GUE would teach you. That and you wind up going to a class to pass rather than going to a class to learn. Anyway, I understand your situation. So enough from me on that topic.

With regards to asking a GUE instructor for advice, you should feel free to do so. The entire list is available in GUE's website. If you want to do the shotgun approach, you can send an email to [email protected] All of the GUE instructors are subscribed to that mail list and you'll likely get more than your fair share of good info.

ianr33
10-02-2007, 18:16
Why do you want to get into "tech" diving?

Are you bored with recreational diving ,or do you just have spare cash burning a hole in your pocket?

kobalap
10-02-2007, 18:17
... and you'll need to take the class in a drysuit...

Could someone confirm on that. I was just reading the required equipment list in the GUE Standards but I didn't find anything about drysuit. It only mentions doubles and canister light for the tech pass.

Hmm... this might actually be an implied requirement.

GUE believes in diving a balanced rig. As such, they discourage divers from diving double steel tanks with a wetsuit. So presumably, you could take fundies in double aluminum tanks and a wetsuit. I don't know for sure though.

Venio
10-02-2007, 18:28
I might know someone. Give me a few days to look into it.


That's awesome, I appreciate it!

CompuDude
10-02-2007, 19:18
... and you'll need to take the class in a drysuit...

Could someone confirm on that. I was just reading the required equipment list in the GUE Standards but I didn't find anything about drysuit. It only mentions doubles and canister light for the tech pass.

Hmm... this might actually be an implied requirement.

GUE believes in diving a balanced rig. As such, they discourage divers from diving double steel tanks with a wetsuit. So presumably, you could take fundies in double aluminum tanks and a wetsuit. I don't know for sure though.

That's probably true. Drysuits are encouraged, however, unless the water is just too warm to handle it. In SoCal, you won't find anyone looking for a tech pass wearing a wetsuit.

Venio, I wasn't denigrating your experience, in fact if you re-read what I wrote, I specifically mentioned that everyone has different thresholds. I wrote that specifically to differentiate my post from the one above that jumped all over you for your "lack of experience".

I agree with the "don't go into it looking for a pass right off the bat" concept. I sympathize with your need to travel, however, with no local instructors. Still, unless you are seeking further training from GUE, a "pass" is meaningless. Learning the skills in the class... or at least, learning what the skills should look like, in the class... is the most important thing.

Venio
10-02-2007, 19:36
CompuDude, I never thought you are denigrating my experience. I sould also add that you are one of the people one this board who's responsible for me joining the dark side :). I'm pretty pleased with ALL of the responses on the topic and find them quite enlightening.

vadiver
10-02-2007, 20:02
When I took my fundies class I was did it in a 3mm wetsuit and dbl AL 80s--a very balanced rig for the class. I'll be taking my Tech 1 soon (fingers crossed) and plan to do it in the same rig. There is no requirement for a dry suit per se, but you need an "Exposure suit appropriate for the duration of exposure."

Also, IMHO DIR-F (rec) will teach you the basic fundamental skills every diver needs and should have. Taking it before you have established bad habits would make the learning curve easier.

The best thing would be to talk to a fundies instructor and ask about it. He'll in form you of the requirements and discuss everything with you. Telling him/her what your long term goals are will guide the discussion.
(When I took my fundies I drove to Fla for the course. I'll take Tech 1 with the same instructor)

CaribbeanDiver
10-04-2007, 16:10
Could someone that have taken or even passed :smiley20: this course to give some more inside on what to expect from it. I would love to take it the near future.

Thanks.I can tell you the WHOLE course is dependent upon the instructor you get. Get a good one and you have a good class, get a bad one and you get a bad class.

CompuDude
10-04-2007, 16:27
Could someone that have taken or even passed :smiley20: this course to give some more inside on what to expect from it. I would love to take it the near future.

Thanks.I can tell you the WHOLE course is dependent upon the instructor you get. Get a good one and you have a good class, get a bad one and you get a bad class.
They're all good instructors. The question is, whether their particular manner and instruction style is good for you. Someone can be a GREAT instructor and still have personality conflicts or teaching styles that don't interface well with a small percentage of unlucky people.

If you're the person I'm thinking of on another board, you took part of a DIR-F and had a bad experience with it... but the general consensus of the post-analysis seemed to be a large part of the issue lay with the fact that you were trying out new (and very different) gear (to you) for the very first time and were having buoyancy issues that prevented you from gaining the most benefit from the class. There's a lesson to be learned there, certainly, which is get comfortable in the gear FIRST and have your buoyancy nailed down in that gear before taking the class, if you want to gain the most benefit from the course. But that really doesn't have to do with whether or not the instructor was actually a good instructor or not.

MSilvia
10-04-2007, 16:50
As an alternative to travelling, consider getting some interested divers together and splitting the cost of getting an instructor to come to you. That's what happened with the class I took, and it saved us all a bit of money.

That aside, I'll put in another recommendation for taking the class as a learning experience, and not worrying at first about passing it. If you are able to, great. If you aren't, but want to, you'll have plenty of time to work on your skills before auditing another class. On the other hand, if you leave without the card, you still know what you can improve, and you can better your diving for it's own sake without going though the trouble of getting a card that, in all honesty, most divers and dive operations wouldn't recognise if you showed it to them. Unless you plan to pursue advanced training with GUE, you'll never need it. There are a lot of very good recreational divers out there who don't pass DIR-F on the first (or second) try. It's an intentionally high bar.

Venio
10-04-2007, 17:25
As an alternative to travelling, consider getting some interested divers together and splitting the cost of getting an instructor to come to you. That's what happened with the class I took, and it saved us all a bit of money.


Matt, I was thinking about that just I have one small problem. I'm still looking to find ANY DIR interested divers in the DFW area. I got few pointer as of where to look but no one in particular.

I'm definitely looking to get in the GUE Tech classes in once I got more dives. That's the reason I want to take DIR-F.

texdiveguy
10-04-2007, 18:21
[QUOTE=MSilvia;68051]

Matt, I was thinking about that just I have one small problem. I'm still looking to find ANY DIR interested divers in the DFW area. I got few pointer as of where to look but no one in particular.

I'm definitely looking to get in the GUE Tech classes in once I got more dives. That's the reason I want to take DIR-F.

IMO--

I am in Arlington, Tx..

You are going to find very few true DIR/GUE divers in this area.....and training classes...well you will have to get a group to bring in an instructor or travel.

I have been known to do some technical diving now and then, but are in no way a DIR minded diver.

If you have any questions regarding technical gas diving drop me a PM, I will do my best to help you out.

Best wishes!

CaribbeanDiver
10-06-2007, 22:23
... and you'll need to take the class in a drysuit...

Could someone confirm on that. I was just reading the required equipment list in the GUE Standards but I didn't find anything about drysuit. It only mentions doubles and canister light for the tech pass.
no drysuit is required

CaribbeanDiver
12-08-2007, 11:42
Could someone that have taken or even passed :smiley20: this course to give some more inside on what to expect from it. I would love to take it the near future.

Thanks.I can tell you the WHOLE course is dependent upon the instructor you get. Get a good one and you have a good class, get a bad one and you get a bad class.
They're all good instructors. The question is, whether their particular manner and instruction style is good for you. Someone can be a GREAT instructor and still have personality conflicts or teaching styles that don't interface well with a small percentage of unlucky people.

If you're the person I'm thinking of on another board, you took part of a DIR-F and had a bad experience with it... but the general consensus of the post-analysis seemed to be a large part of the issue lay with the fact that you were trying out new (and very different) gear (to you) for the very first time and were having buoyancy issues that prevented you from gaining the most benefit from the class. There's a lesson to be learned there, certainly, which is get comfortable in the gear FIRST and have your buoyancy nailed down in that gear before taking the class, if you want to gain the most benefit from the course. But that really doesn't have to do with whether or not the instructor was actually a good instructor or not. well contrary to your view, there are indeed bad instructors. Second, when asking specific questions relating to class objectives and gear and the reply is merely a link to GUE's website, that is not what I expect of a "good" instructor.
I dont want to beat a dead horse, but I had a bad instructor, period. I was there, you were not, and your opinion is conjecture whereas my opinion is observation and personal experience.

woody
12-08-2007, 14:24
As an alternative to travelling, consider getting some interested divers together and splitting the cost of getting an instructor to come to you. That's what happened with the class I took, and it saved us all a bit of money.


Matt, I was thinking about that just I have one small problem. I'm still looking to find ANY DIR interested divers in the DFW area. I got few pointer as of where to look but no one in particular.

I'm definitely looking to get in the GUE Tech classes in once I got more dives. That's the reason I want to take DIR-F.

The most active group 'locally' that I know of is in Austin. I'll see if I can find someone to talk to there.

Tekdivr
08-26-2009, 10:45
I took this course approx 7 years ago, before they started talking rec/tec passes. I drove 10 hours to be able to take the course and it was worth every bit of it. My instructors were Dave Sweetin and Tyler Moon. Both came up to Virginia from Florida. I had already logged approx 150 dives by then and had intro cave certification, but there was still so much to learn. One of the most interesting aspects of the course is, they video tape the underwater portions and critique them after dinner. This gives you an actual perspective of what you're doing wrong and then they gives you the tools/info to make it right the next day. It's always better to see it for yourself than to hear it from someone else. By no means is this course a walk in the park, and whether or not you pass it makes no difference, but it's defintely worth the investment. You don't have to continue training with GUE to realize the benefits of their program.

Shark Bait!
10-12-2009, 07:32
Here is a list of DIR divers by location. It is from another forum so i hope that isnt a problem.

DIR Divers by area - ScubaBoard (http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/dir/268852-dir-divers-area.html)

frozenwarp
10-13-2009, 01:27
I found this discussion interesting, I have a similar problem with my closest instructor living 10 hours away but what i have worked out is with 3 of us doing the course it is acctually easier to fly him over. As far as how long one should wait i believe this is a personal thing, i personaly am just about to do fundies i have been diving for a few years now and have a few hundred dives but i believe it is the last 150 or so which have been done using full tech kit(twins,can light,drysuit,etc) that i have learnt the most. I also know a mate who has only just completed his 100th dive but has alreasy passed fundies and tech 1 and i believe this is mainly due to the fact he had the passion, practiced and did start diving full tech gear fairly soon after doing his OW prob aroud his 30th dive or so.

to the op good luck with fundies and enjoy, im sure you'll learn alot as i too expect to

j1j2j38
01-18-2010, 15:17
I would think travel would be somewhat less of an issue for the course if you have the money and time for the courses and equipment in the first place. Finding people to practice with on a more regular basis would be helpful though. Even if you can't find GUE followers in the area, I would imagine you can find more experienced people in the tech diving community to practice with. You could try looking for dive shops that offer tech courses and call around, a lot of people don't use the forums.

StreetDoctor
01-18-2010, 16:01
Your best bet is to get ahold of an instructor. Check out the forums at Welcome | Global Underwater Explorers (http://www.gue.com) also. I had Ed Gabe drive up to Chicago from Kentucky for my class last year. Ed is an awesome teacher and very laid back, not intimidating in the slightest. I can definitely recommend taking the class split up so you have some time to practice what you've learned. I took it split over two weekends. In 10 days I'll be driving down to florida to take Tech 1 with Bob Sherwood.

The # of dives doesn't really have anything to do with fundies, but being able to hold your position in the water column so you can watch demonstrations is very important. If you can't see the demos because you're constantly swimming it makes learning that much harder. I had about 110 dives when I took FWIW.

Good luck and let me know if you have any specific questions, I took the class pretty recently (Nov '09)