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jlittlejohn321
10-03-2007, 15:41
I was on a dive boat about a month ago and they were talking about how i should not go 100 feet cause im 13. They said it wasnt safe for me to. I am wondering what everyone else thinks about this. Does age really make you more or less safe?

Chad
10-03-2007, 15:50
It is probably due to the fact that your body is growing and little is known on the effect of pressure during development. No reason to chance causing a problem when you have a lifetime of diving ahead of you. If it helps you are not missing out on much. Most of the cool stuff to look at is shallow.

scuba-taylor
10-03-2007, 17:43
It is probably due to the fact that your body is growing and little is known on the effect of pressure during development. No reason to chance causing a problem when you have a lifetime of diving ahead of you. If it helps you are not missing out on much. Most of the cool stuff to look at is shallow.

I agree you don't have to go deep just to see cool stuff!:smiley20:

ScubaJenn81
10-03-2007, 18:20
I agree that they just do not know what the effects on your body can be. There are plenty of skilled teenagers the respect the rules, and there are plenty of dumb adults that mess around. It is nothing against you being young, just staying safe to dive another 50 plus years.

TxScubaBear
10-03-2007, 18:33
True on seeing NOTHING that deep (100 feet), 30-50 feet will grant you plenty of sights to behold!

cyclone
10-03-2007, 18:45
I also agree, sometimes they tell us it's not about the age it's about maturity. I think it's the length of experience too. And what the heck, play safe, I think thats matters the most.:smiley2::smiley20:

tbuckalew
10-03-2007, 18:53
Sounds like everyone is on the same track - and medically, they are right. Not much is known about the effects of pressure and growth. There are some theories (you probably wouldn't like them, but they would probably keep you from going deep) - but nothing concrete.

Besides, except for some wrecks, there really isn't much to see. Once the life giving portions of sunlight are filtered out of the water with depth, no much grows. That growth provides for the smallest of creatures the feed larger creatures and so on. That is why active coral reef structures are rather shallow and full of life!

scubasavvy
10-04-2007, 17:12
I've seen some dopey divers over 40 and kids who know the book, table, equipment, and procedures backward and forward. Give it some time my friend. Your body needs to finish growing, and it's dark down there...

jlittlejohn321
10-04-2007, 18:26
Yeah i didnt think it was that dark and there was a lot of life down there i saw a southern ray some goliaths eels and turtles and of course coral and fish

cgvmer
10-04-2007, 19:16
I know when you are certified with PADI before age 16 you are considered "junior" OW with a limit of 60ft.

So 100fsw would be considered deep for this cert.

Tbuckalew you commented that there are theories, do you have pointers to any possible issues?

Kingpatzer
10-04-2007, 19:57
I'd also toss out that you shouldn't dive deeper than the cu.ft. capacity of your tank. So if those adults are diving to 100ft on 80's, they are actually not being particularly safe. It's one thing for them to mess around with their own safety when they should know better, but it's quite another for them to mess around with yours.

And everyone else here is right as well -- depth isn't necessarily more interesting or fun, it's just bragging rights, and frankly, those aren't worth the risk if you don't have the training (and if you aren't deep dive certified, you don't). There are medical concerns that are not well understood. Stay near the top of the reef for a few more years and enjoy the stuff that's there -- you aren't missing much, and you've got your whole diving career in front of you.

cgvmer
10-04-2007, 20:33
I just found this DAN article which isn't very definitive but give some indications why limits are set by the certifying agencies: http://www.diversalertnetwork.org/membership/alert-diver/article.asp?ArticleID=319

somewhereinla
10-04-2007, 21:01
The fact is that nobody really knows, so until we do better safe than sorry.

cgvmer
10-04-2007, 21:14
Exactly that's what I have told my 13yr old son and daughter who turns 10 in Nov.

Black-Gorrilla
10-05-2007, 15:15
It is probably due to the fact that your body is growing and little is known on the effect of pressure during development. No reason to chance causing a problem when you have a lifetime of diving ahead of you. If it helps you are not missing out on much. Most of the cool stuff to look at is shallow.

that is true... the good stuff is at 50 or less, and it's also alot more light up there.
you can wait to go to 100, not missing much.

mark44883
10-23-2007, 13:13
hold tight little dude all in good time

WaScubaDude
10-23-2007, 17:49
Sounds like everyone is on the same track - and medically, they are right. Not much is known about the effects of pressure and growth. There are some theories (you probably wouldn't like them, but they would probably keep you from going deep) - but nothing concrete.

Besides, except for some wrecks, there really isn't much to see. Once the life giving portions of sunlight are filtered out of the water with depth, no much grows. That growth provides for the smallest of creatures the feed larger creatures and so on. That is why active coral reef structures are rather shallow and full of life!

I would say dive less than 50ft for as many dives as it takes for you to be rocked five times and find your true "freak factor" then dive 10ft deeper. and so on.

divechaplain-sara
10-23-2007, 22:09
I'd also toss out that you shouldn't dive deeper than the cu.ft. capacity of your tank. So if those adults are diving to 100ft on 80's, they are actually not being particularly safe. It's one thing for them to mess around with their own safety when they should know better, but it's quite another for them to mess around with yours.

And everyone else here is right as well -- depth isn't necessarily more interesting or fun, it's just bragging rights, and frankly, those aren't worth the risk if you don't have the training (and if you aren't deep dive certified, you don't). There are medical concerns that are not well understood. Stay near the top of the reef for a few more years and enjoy the stuff that's there -- you aren't missing much, and you've got your whole diving career in front of you.


What is your basis for this? I've never heard it before.

GNX Guy
10-24-2007, 12:13
My little guy going through certification now won't be going any deeper than 25 - 30 feet. That's were all the good stuff is anyway.

Joe

JahJahwarrior
10-24-2007, 12:21
I'd also toss out that you shouldn't dive deeper than the cu.ft. capacity of your tank. So if those adults are diving to 100ft on 80's, they are actually not being particularly safe. It's one thing for them to mess around with their own safety when they should know better, but it's quite another for them to mess around with yours.



I guess it's time for me to invest in the doubled LP120s so I can get a nice cave fill, for a good 180 cu.ft. of air per tank, or 360 total.

Of course, there is the fact that a normoxic gas will be toxic to me at that depth...

really your rule should be that you cannot dive deeper than your mix allows. Actual capacity of the tank does play a role, but not "cu. ft. = max depth." (a 40 cu. ft. bottle of pure o2 as a deco gas is lethal below 20 feet, but your rule says it's fine till 40 :) ) It's more like "take enough air that you can get back on the boat with plenty left." For cave diving, you dive until you've used up 1/3rd of your backgas, so that you will surface with 1/3rd of it. Many rec divers like to get on the boat with 500 psig. Personally, I've dived to 130 feet on an aluminum 100, my NDL let me stay down for about 5 or 6 minutes, if I recall correctly, I actually spent most of the time around 120, 125, so I ended up with about 10 minutes of bottom time, and another 5 or 10 minutes at close to 100 feet on a sunken boat in the quarry doing a simple line drill. I surfaced with more than 1500 psi and was able to do a 30 minute dive at 40 feet and still have way more than 500 psig in my tank upon surfacing. I would have no problems diving to 150 on the same tank. Of course, normal air becomes potentially lethal around 240 feet, IIRC, so I wouldn't go deeper than that, and I wouldn't go deeper than my current "record" of 130 until I have taken a deco class, so I can spend some real time down there, you know?


So fundamentally, I disagree that 100 feet on an aluminum 80 is particularly unsafe due to tank size. If a person dives to 100 feet and doesn't know when to ascend to avoid a deco obligation, or if a person dives to 100 feet and burns through their air and isn't paying attention, or if they do it on an empty aluminum 80, that would be dangerous. If you've been diving for very long at all, you breathing rate is probably fine for a 100 foot dive on an 80.

divnhank
10-25-2007, 11:04
I agree with JahJah Warrior, recreational diving to 100' or even 130' on an 80 is safe, just follow the rules you were taught.

And also agree with the group that you will see a lot above 60'. I have seen more eagle rays, sea lions, etc., at 15' than deeper. Besides, the deeper you go, the less time you have, so what's the hurry?

dludwig
10-27-2007, 18:18
Besides, the deeper you go, the less time you have, so what's the hurry?

We all forget that occasionally:smiley20:

cummings66
10-30-2007, 18:19
The rule on tank size is more a guess about the average divers air consumption rate, nothing more. If you have a great consumption rate, if you have a buddy who's your equal with it, then you can dive deeper. But if one of you is average then you had better plan the dive around that average buddy.

The thing about diving deep isn't so much that's it's a super human skill that only the few select chosen can do, it's more that there are knowledge items you need to know in order to do it safely every single time. Anybody can get lucky once, it takes skill to do it repeatably.

JahJahwarrior
10-30-2007, 20:34
Yeah, plan your dive....but I'd say plan to turn at 1/3s. Make an educated guess about what depth you can be at and for what time based on air consumption and NDL's, but the whole "dive your plan" thing only works 100% of the time if your plan is to survive. I don't care what my plan is, I'm turning the dive at thirds. No matter what the depth, who my buddy is, or the phase of the moon, I turn at thirds. That way, I am virtually assured I will never run out of air.


Of course, I can go very deep on 1/3 of my air supply if I plumett like a rock and that'll get me bent....so of course I would turn my dive before I hit NDL's....

cummings66
10-30-2007, 21:22
For a recreational dive there is absolutely no need to turn at thirds. In fact you're wasting a lot of good diving by doing that.

Plan your dive based on your air consumption and that of your buddies, figure how much air you'd need to return to the surface while sharing air and if you really want more safety then pad the figure with a few hundred more psi. Any diver diving deep really should have the knowledge to understand the environment, and even basic self rescue as taught in a rescue course or better stated risk management.

To turn at thirds in a recreational setting simply isn't needed. That's part of what's missing in dive training, why things are done as they are. Without the why a person can't make a reasonable decision. Right now you're taught in OW to be on the surface with 500 psi. How to do that is left as an exercise in frustration.

Here's the question, where is it appropriate and taught to turn at thirds, halves, and even dare I say rock bottom? When a person can answer those questions and understand why they answered as they did they're starting to be ready for the deeper diving.

I'm not going to say what the turn pressure should be, only that it should vary according to the dive being planned and on your buddy.

JahJahwarrior
10-30-2007, 23:36
The turn pressure should be at or before the point where you have enough gas to get you and your buddy out alive.

A decent portion of my dives are cavern dives, or more appropriately, "ledge dives." but technicall, there's an overhang, it's overhead, it's a cavern. Some sites we'll dive to 1/3rds in the overhead part and after an SI dive down to about 1000 psi staying out of the overhead areas.

I'm diving with 100s and can usually get a good 30 minute + dive turning at thirds.

Arriving at the surface with 500 psi is not a good rule--you need to arrive with enough gas for you and your buddy. I like to surface around 1000 if doing a purely OW dive, 1500/1600 or so in a turn-at-thirds situation. Not exact math, just close. If I was in a cave I'd do the math and figure out my and my buddies third point.

Basically, rule of thirds makes sense, you should never run out of gas diving thirds, you always have enough for you and your buddy. Most of my diving is springs and possibly cavern/overhead, so following the rule of thirds is prudent, and I get cold in the springs if I'm in there too long :) If I was diving in the nice water of the Carribbean, I'd haul two tanks down with me and surface on someone's octo :) I know springs diving isn't at all "cold water" diving but....I never got out of the water on my caribbean dives on a cruise because I particularly wanted to :)

cummings66
10-31-2007, 07:02
I get you, but then you're not doing recreational dives either and the rule of thirds makes great sense when you're diving in an overhead situation and can't directly ascend to the surface.

After some reflection I can think of a place where that rule would work in an OW recreational dive. Say you were on a boat and used a down-line for example, it would work there.

The brief exchange we've had does illustrate why diving deep isn't as simple as many divers think, just hop in and go down. There are planning issues to consider and exactly how you handle them depends on the environment as you've illustrated.

I suppose with computers being what they are today you can forget planning and just dive deep, I know mine tells me how much gas I've got left and how long until I hit my turn pressure, it doesn't tell me anything useful to take care of my buddy but for solo diving it would work perfectly without any planning. I don't dive that way, but it's possible.

JahJahwarrior
10-31-2007, 11:23
Oh, I'm not against planning at all. It is advisable to plan your dive the best you can. Diving to 130 in Hudson Grotto, my buddy and I planned to drop down the the platform, then head off in whatever direction we wanted to taking a line in the form of my finger spool, then carefully watch our depth and NDL's, figuring we had about 5 to 8 minutes to explore before we would need to be back on the platform, and we would have plenty of air to stay down that long.


And while my dives aren't purely recreational, they aren't quite "technical" either. I'm really on a fine line there, it's like a technical environment that the park owners have deemed acceptable for OW divers to dive in.

couped243
11-02-2007, 05:06
OK Junior Diver, this place got all tech-e all of a sudden like star wars or something...hahaha Just to piggy back on your topic and on what some people were saying. Dives should be planned to the skill of the least experienced diver and rightfully so. it has nothing to do with age for the most part just skill and experience. So if a person who is lets say 30 just got his OW cert last week was on the boat with you, he shouldn't be diving to 100 ft either. I mean he very well could but. Buoyancy not all there, air consumption may be off, not overly familiar with his or her gear. You follow what I'm saying, so don't worry you will get your chance. Diving is about learning and there are plenty of courses you can take in the future. For now just relax and enjoy. My son just got his cert he's 15 and I definitely will not let him dive to 100ft. I like to get lobster and spearfish and most of my dives are around 40 ft. unless I'm on a wreck or something. Just my 02. Have fun!!!!!!

bubble-head
11-03-2007, 18:50
I started diving at 14. I did my first "deep" dive, in a quarry, at age 15 to 90 feet. I began ocean diving and would regularly dive deep wrecks (90+ feet) on a regular basis at age 16. I was a very safe diver and well-know on the charters I frequented. My age never really made a difference. Once your skill level increases, the captain and crew will probably not worry about your age too much, focusing more on your diving skill and safety.

Scubling
11-10-2007, 19:21
Well I think the only differnce is that a kids eardrum is not as developed as a adults ( adults can go down deeper than a kid with less of a risk )

ChrisA
12-07-2007, 11:43
I was on a dive boat about a month ago and they were talking about how i should not go 100 feet cause im 13. They said it wasnt safe for me to. I am wondering what everyone else thinks about this. Does age really make you more or less safe?

No proof yet that it is unsafe but on the other hand there is no data that it is safe and there are some theories about why not to dive that deep. It is un-ethical to do experiments on kids. Hard to get a grant when your proposal reads "take young kids past 100 feet in a chamber and see what effect nitrogen has on bones that are still growing." Likely nothing would happen if you only did one or two dives like that

I ate nemo
12-21-2007, 13:31
i dont think that age will affect the way you dive. im 14 and im allowed to dive 100ft. i guess it really depends on the way the person dives and how they react underwater.

Scubling
03-23-2008, 10:12
Well I would have to agree that age would make you less safe in deeper waters such as 70-100+ feet because of the pressure on your ears but in more shallow waters you shouldn't have a problem!

ChrisA
03-25-2008, 17:04
I was on a dive boat about a month ago and they were talking about how i should not go 100 feet cause im 13. They said it wasnt safe for me to. I am wondering what everyone else thinks about this. Does age really make you more or less safe?

The problem is that no one has done experients on kids. If you are under 16 your bones are still growing and are difference from an adult's bones. There is reason to think that maybe this makes a difference. But it is un-ethical to experiment on kids just to see what happens so they advise a depth limit. We do know that very frequent deep diving that comercial diers do (8+ hour shift at 200+ feet and so on all the time for years) has a bad effect on their bones

There is also the issue of experiance and jundgement. Try an experiment some time. Lay out a 100 foot long line on the bottom at 30 feet and swimm along the line from end to end at a normal speed and time the run and count the kick cycles. You will be surprized how long 100 feet is. Then you think of how far down you are at 100 feet.

ChrisA
03-25-2008, 17:07
Well I think the only differnce is that a kids eardrum is not as developed as a adults ( adults can go down deeper than a kid with less of a risk )

No. It's not the ear drum. If this was going to be a problem it would show up at 30 feet, not 100. If you equalize there is no stres on the eardrum. The main reason sites is that no one has ever done studies on the effects of high parial presures of nitrogen on young kids. All the test subjects were over 18, sothere is simply no data.

diver 85
04-01-2008, 09:21
I was on a dive boat about a month ago and they were talking about how i should not go 100 feet cause im 13. They said it wasnt safe for me to. I am wondering what everyone else thinks about this. Does age really make you more or less safe?

IMO, the answer to your question is it depends---on your present diving skills AND knowledge of diving....Example, when our youngest of three (that were all certified @ ages of 12) was certified, 3 days later he was diving in Grand Cayman to depths of 90 feet..Today @ the age of 26, he's 5'11" 195# and can drive a golf ball 300+ yds(carries a 2 hdcp)....In other words, know your 'stuff' & you'll be as good as a newly certified adult diver(Little more history on the youngest---@ age 10 when the 2nd to youngest was certified, the youngest was actually teaching the 2nd to youngest the dive charts & other theory about diving.....also made a 33 on his ACT & valedictorian of hs class etc etc etc ).....

Largo
04-01-2008, 21:38
If you call Diver's Alert Network at 1-800-446-2671, they will answer your questions.

The NAUI Junior Certification (ages 10-14) stipulates that the junior diver must agree to 1. Dive with a certified adult diver of the parent's choosing, and 2. Limit his or her depth to no deeper than 60 feet.

RibbitPenguin
04-27-2008, 09:39
My dad is a maniac when it comes to diving. Actually, I think he's an idiot becuase he's willing to go to 200 feet on just air. His reasoning is that your certified to 130 feet, but that's just a safety net. He says that he'd be willing to go down to 160 feet if there was something he wanted to see.

I don't have any desire to go past 60 feet. I have always had problems with my ears (as a result of too much flying when I was a baby, my ears are VERY sensitive to pressure), and any deeper than 60 feet, even with equalising, makes them scream with pain. Also, I'm very claustrophobic (As a result of an elevator crashing when I was 5 years old and being stuck in it for 3 hours), and the knowledge that I'm deeper than 60 feet really starts to panic me.

There's alot of places to dive around here, most of them topping out at about 75-8-0 feet. Philadelphia Quarry, where I had my certifying dives, tops out at 70, which is really just a big hole that drops down. The cool stuff (statues, boats, vending machines) is all at less than 50 feet.

I'm a safe diver, don't get me wrong, but I don't like diving with people who are overly precationary and overly safe. That ticks me off to no end.

As for being a junior diver and diving to 100 feet, I say go for it unless there is hardcore proof that it'll hurt you. As long as you follow what your instructor taught you, you should be fine.

dogseatmayo
08-01-2008, 16:18
they didn't mean you weren't good enough, just being precautious. it increases risk of dcs you know. and you wouldn't want that when you were 13

oddbod
08-03-2008, 03:03
There are growth plates on the ends of your bones, fed by fine blood vessels
that would not take much to damage, unluckily once damaged the bone stops growing. Possibly this is one of the reasons why they limit depth, and associated micro bubble formation, for immature bodies. Anyone who played volleyball or other similiar ball sports at a very young age just need to look at the differing length of their fingers to see the damage caused.:smiley19:

sravin1
08-03-2008, 15:33
There are growth plates on the ends of your bones, fed by fine blood vessels
that would not take much to damage, unluckily once damaged the bone stops growing. Possibly this is one of the reasons why they limit depth, and associated micro bubble formation, for immature bodies. Anyone who played volleyball or other similiar ball sports at a very young age just need to look at the differing length of their fingers to see the damage caused.:smiley19:

i dont quite agree with that...research shows that loading of joints increases bone growth. osteoblasts (bone forming cells) respond positively to pressure.

according to me the reason for restricting depth is a precutionary measure. nobody even knows what effect even 60 feet would have on brain development.

its better to be safe than sorry.

oddbod
08-05-2008, 07:04
There are growth plates on the ends of your bones, fed by fine blood vessels
that would not take much to damage, unluckily once damaged the bone stops growing. Possibly this is one of the reasons why they limit depth, and associated micro bubble formation, for immature bodies. Anyone who played volleyball or other similiar ball sports at a very young age just need to look at the differing length of their fingers to see the damage caused.:smiley19:

i dont quite agree with that...research shows that loading of joints increases bone growth. osteoblasts (bone forming cells) respond positively to pressure.

according to me the reason for restricting depth is a precutionary measure. nobody even knows what effect even 60 feet would have on brain development.

its better to be safe than sorry.

I think it is if micro bubbles form and block the blood supply that could then cause damage to the epiphyseal plates more than the pressure alone. Did read a study about 15 years ago about micro bubbles causing necrosis in bones of adult divers.
Yes loading of the bone does increase bone density, however damage, ie: hairline fractures etc, can cause permanent damage to the plates and interupt bone growth, often the cause for children to need bone lengthening procedures after leg fractures.

tonka97
08-05-2008, 07:59
I was on a dive boat about a month ago and they were talking about how i should not go 100 feet cause im 13. They said it wasnt safe for me to. I am wondering what everyone else thinks about this. Does age really make you more or less safe?

The August 2008 issue of Dive Training has a great informative article about children and scuba. Concerns include the high incidence of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in children, allowing nitrogen to be pumped directly into the arterial system without passing through the lungs. Another concern was that lung tissue is more vulnerable to damage in children compared to adults. Asthma and emotional maturity were discussed.

The author sums up by pointing out that there are many activities children engage in that are hazardous...so it is up to your parents to weigh the risk/benefit issue.

Patent foramen ovale (PFO) Patent Foramen Ovale (http://www.yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/patent-foramen-ovale.html)

sravin1
08-05-2008, 11:59
There are growth plates on the ends of your bones, fed by fine blood vessels
that would not take much to damage, unluckily once damaged the bone stops growing. Possibly this is one of the reasons why they limit depth, and associated micro bubble formation, for immature bodies. Anyone who played volleyball or other similiar ball sports at a very young age just need to look at the differing length of their fingers to see the damage caused.:smiley19:

i dont quite agree with that...research shows that loading of joints increases bone growth. osteoblasts (bone forming cells) respond positively to pressure.

according to me the reason for restricting depth is a precutionary measure. nobody even knows what effect even 60 feet would have on brain development.

its better to be safe than sorry.

I think it is if micro bubbles form and block the blood supply that could then cause damage to the epiphyseal plates more than the pressure alone. Did read a study about 15 years ago about micro bubbles causing necrosis in bones of adult divers.
Yes loading of the bone does increase bone density, however damage, ie: hairline fractures etc, can cause permanent damage to the plates and interupt bone growth, often the cause for children to need bone lengthening procedures after leg fractures.

you were right. just read about it. i also found out there are other concerns as well. i have pasted a link to an article that discusses many issues.

Doc Vikingo's Children & Diving (http://www.awoosh.com/Doc%20Vikingo's%20Resource%20Page/Children_&_Diving.htm)

in_cavediver
08-07-2008, 16:44
One more: Larry Harris

Why I Do NOT Train Kids In Scuba Diving (http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lpt/kids.htm)

Rockhound76
08-08-2008, 13:54
Oh, man...my son has been diving since he was 14yrs. old. Some dives have been, er, deep, due to the locales.

I've been diving since I was a teen, 32 years ago, no obvious developmental effects.

Well, maybe ONE. I can't seem to remember the number, er, the number, you know, the one between 8 and, er, the other one.

Okay, maybe I have trouble with numbers. That's all though...well, except for my one leg being somewhat longer...I mean ONE of my legs being longer than the other two..

Did I say I had trouble with numbers?

csterling95
08-14-2008, 10:38
yes and no because your knowledge matters and your size doesn't:smiley13:

James1010
11-13-2008, 19:46
Now some younger people I have seen diving are great. But I have seen some younger divers who got spooked or had issues and tried to dart for the surface and panic. Now not all younger divers are like that. There are some who are twice the diver I am. The point I am getting at is any diver at any age who can relax and not panic and stay calm in any situation is a great diver.

James1010
11-13-2008, 19:50
Oh one more thing ha ha. If you ever go diving in Pal Mul (I know I spelled that wrong) one of the dive masters there is a local and he goes out diving and brings his son who I think start diving at a very young age. What he does is he holds his son under his arm and gives him his octo and they dive together. It's pretty cool, dangerous yes but pretty awesome to see how a father and son can do something together like that.

heydn62
11-14-2008, 09:16
My son seems very comfortable on his dives. I'm always keeping my eye on him, but my biggest concern is getting him to pay attention to me. :paranoid:

mwhities
11-14-2008, 09:49
Now some younger people I have seen diving are great. But I have seen some younger divers who got spooked or had issues and tried to dart for the surface and panic. Now not all younger divers are like that. There are some who are twice the diver I am. The point I am getting at is any diver at any age who can relax and not panic and stay calm in any situation is a great diver.

I agree. This one here come to mind.

The Deco Stop (http://thedecostop.com/forums/showthread.php?t=34021)

I'd dive with that kid any day. (He already knows more than I do and I'm AOW with a little adv nitrox/deco training.haha) I'm going to get his instructor to train me. :)

Michael

floridabassman
12-27-2008, 16:18
im 15, as of today, and my opinion is that adults are only more safe because of more experiance. on the other hand, most new divers, like you and me, are probably teachable and actually listen, while many adults tend to jump in and wing it.

Rockhound76
12-29-2008, 13:55
im 15, as of today, and my opinion is that adults are only more safe because of more experiance. on the other hand, most new divers, like you and me, are probably teachable and actually listen, while many adults tend to jump in and wing it.


Good answer. You'll make a good diver.

My son is 15. He now has over 50 dives for the year, the deepest to 118' in Grand Cayman. Over the summer, he made about 20 dives from 70 to 105 feet to explore wrecks in Florida. He is now, officially, a wreck maniac. He likes it more than bluewater diving (no penetrations yet, as he is not trained.)

He is interested in the sites more than the depth and prefers shallow for the extended bottom time.

Some medical concerns exist for young divers, but most of this is anecdotal or inferred. Like I said before, I've been diving since I was 18 and I'm now 51. So far, no problems.

spikegomez
12-30-2008, 01:08
Some times age is a matter in diving... for me, because our body got less speed when we have aged... and less energy....


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Blacnite
01-11-2009, 15:03
Hi guys, good topic, the main issue is there is little imformation on or if there is any research on the effects of pressure on the junior diver body. I do know some divers that have been diving for years... almost as soon as the could fit into scuba equipment and there seems to be no adverse effects on them years later as adults. However they never exceeded 25mtrs and were very conscious of their own safety, had good adult divers with them at all times. The main thing to keep in mind is that the body at a adolesant age is still developing which means it is not at its strongest so we must err the side of caution on top of all the other advises that others in this this forum wisely state.

Blacnite
01-11-2009, 15:04
Hi guys, good topic, the main issue is there is little imformation on or if there is any research on the effects of pressure on the junior diver body. I do know some divers that have been diving for years... almost as soon as the could fit into scuba equipment and there seems to be no adverse effects on them years later as adults. However they never exceeded 25mtrs and were very conscious of their own safety, had good adult divers with them at all times. The main thing to keep in mind is that the body at a adolesant age is still developing which means it is not at its strongest so we must err the side of caution on top of all the other advises that others in this this forum wisely state.:smiley20:

fireblossom4
02-10-2009, 17:02
well its not really about that, its because some depths can damage the developing growth plates