PDA

View Full Version : settings that I always use on my simple camera



beenerachi
10-16-2007, 15:35
If you are a beginner like myself and using a '$200' setup (I have a Canon S-1), see if your camera has a white-balance manual setting and set your white balance at various subjects/background. It may improve your picture. And try to play with your exposure settings as well. There are other settings: exposure/ISO/F-stops/shutters but try one thing at a time. These are usually great to play around with during those dives where there isn't much action going on.

I don't own a strobe nor have macro setting, but I was able to get some nice shots:

Cheddarchick
11-10-2007, 17:29
Very Nice!!!

jwdizney
11-10-2007, 18:37
great advice, and great pics! thanks for sharing!!

cummings66
11-27-2007, 18:24
I found the same thing on the camera I use, it's a Cannon A620. You can take a white slate down with you and use it to adjust the white balance as well, and it is sometimes better that way. Again a simple camera adjustment.

Here's a sample of what mine did, it could be better but I was in a cavern and just couldn't get a better angle for the shot.
http://i185.photobucket.com/albums/x45/cummings66/BennettSprings045.jpg

ScubaJW
12-10-2007, 21:57
My buddy on his P&S camera, he just uses automatic mode and it's given him the best results. He also has a UW mode in the camera but doesn't like it.

He then later adjusts the colors in Photoshop - usually by autoleveling them.

mrbheagney
09-04-2008, 18:48
There is always plenty of action if you look hard enough for it! Then again, that's difficult when we are staring into and adjusting camera setting most of the time.

mrbheagney
09-04-2008, 18:55
That cuttlefish looks great, where did you see it?

Quassi
03-24-2009, 10:14
Sound advice for the beginner!

And FYI mrbheagney, cuttlefish always look great! :D

Rileybri
03-24-2009, 10:29
If using the built in strobe try holding the camera upside down when shooting as it directs that majority of the strobes light down and lessens the "back Scatter" effect.