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View Full Version : Hose protectors, or No Hose protectors?



WaScubaDude
10-23-2007, 13:27
I am truly undecided on this one.
I have always thought they were a good idea and would prevent kinking and wear near the fittings.
Recently I have noticed mine have slipped a bit, thus putting more kink just before the fitting. Also last dive DB had a leak at 1st stage reg hose under the protector. Finally, while slipping the hose protctor off my old SP reg hose I had to pull so hard (put soap on it) I heard the cord in the hose "snap" and had to toss the hose.
What are your thoughts?

No Misses
10-23-2007, 13:37
I have moved over to the "no hose protector" camp. The protector that came on my DC quick connect tended to hold salt water. If I did not pull it back and rinse thouroughly I would get salt crystals forming around the edges. I am now totally without hose protectors and liking it.

If the hose is showing wear (esp @ conn) replace it. They are relatively inexpensive.

NitroWill
10-23-2007, 13:41
The Sherwood regulators I used for over 500 dives did not have hose protectors on them and I never once had a problem.

If you practice proper maintenance and take care of your *life support equipment* like you should - I see no need for them..

CompuDude
10-23-2007, 14:42
No hose protectors.

They can encourage corrosion, and hide it once it starts. Pulling them off to check if there is any, and to rinse thoroughly (should you be disciplined enough to remember to do so), causes more strain on the hose than simply not having a hose protector.

Keep your hoses visible so they can be rinsed easily, and you can spot problem areas and replace if needed.

Splitlip
10-23-2007, 21:19
If you store your regs properly (flat or slightly coiled depending on the 1st stage) you should not need them. In fact for reasons stated, actually can cause problems. If you hang your regs by the 1st stage, I say use them.

WaScubaDude
11-04-2007, 22:46
No hose protectors.

They can encourage corrosion, and hide it once it starts. Pulling them off to check if there is any, and to rinse thoroughly (should you be disciplined enough to remember to do so), causes more strain on the hose than simply not having a hose protector.

Keep your hoses visible so they can be rinsed easily, and you can spot problem areas and replace if needed.

I cut mine off yesterday. The fittinngs under the hose protectors are more corroded then the ones with out. No hose protectors wins.

Zenagirl
11-05-2007, 07:16
Since we travel to dive, we have them. However, we are extremely dilligent about pulling them back when we clean our gear and actually store them with the protectors pulled away from the fittings. We also have the type with drain holes in them so water doesn't collect underneith.

Netsloth
11-05-2007, 08:06
I just pulled all of mine off. I didn't like that I couldn't see under them. Plus, I had a 5' primary hose that seems to have shrunk, as it was pulling on the right. After I pulled the hose protector off, it was better, but it must get really hot in my garage, cause I ended up swapping out the 5' for a 7'.

The only purpose I can tell that they serve is to hide corrosion and eat up what would otherwise be usable slack.

vadiver
11-05-2007, 08:14
No protectors for me either. As the folks said earlier, they can hide damage to the hose, will hold salt water and prevent a proper rinse. If you route your hoses carefully and store them correctly then you should not have a problem.

(I always carry extra hoses in my save-a-dive kit just in case)

Puffer Fish
11-05-2007, 08:19
Good points.. I have hose protectors.. but I actually don't know why... and I know of the corrosion issue, so I am constantly cleaning under them. I think I need to stop doing things from habit and get rid of them... I even know I have never actually had a hose fail at the connection....even without "protectors"...

Aspendiver
11-05-2007, 08:48
I need hose protectors to hide the rounded off fittings of my frequently self-rerouted hoses. :smiley9:

caroln
11-05-2007, 12:45
I don't like the hose protectors because they force me to wrap my hoses somewhat awkwardly when I am putting my regs in a round reg bag. Since I can't start the curve of the wrap until after the end of the hose protector, I have to wrap somewhat tighter then I'd like for anything less then a short trip. The point about hiding problems is a very good one too, and has convinced me to remove the last of the hose protectors I have.

texdiveguy
11-05-2007, 13:02
I am in the 'no hose protector' group of divers......just like 'no dang tank protectors'!!

Tableleg
11-05-2007, 13:04
I have them because my reg setup came with them. I honestly hadn't given it much thought. And seeing as how I don't get to dive salt water too often, I don't see any reason to get rid of them. Are there other concerns for them being on hoses in fresh water?

CompuDude
11-05-2007, 13:49
I have them because my reg setup came with them. I honestly hadn't given it much thought. And seeing as how I don't get to dive salt water too often, I don't see any reason to get rid of them. Are there other concerns for them being on hoses in fresh water?

They can still hide damage to the hoses (cracking, etc.)... rust and corrosion is not the only damage that can happen to a rubber hose. And fresh water can rust things, too. Not as easily and fast as salt water, but to think you're immune from rust just because it's fresh water would be a mistake.

rfreddo
11-05-2007, 15:06
With all the downside, why is it standard practice (at least in the case of the one reg purchase I've made to date!) to include them?

I can understand why Joe and Larry like to use the ones with the shameless Scubatoys.com logo, but why do the manufacturers use them?

CompuDude
11-05-2007, 15:21
With all the downside, why is it standard practice (at least in the case of the one reg purchase I've made to date!) to include them?

I can understand why Joe and Larry like to use the ones with the shameless Scubatoys.com logo, but why do the manufacturers use them?

Look cool = sell more stuff.

2thdivr
11-05-2007, 18:27
Put me in the don't use group

thesmoothdome
11-05-2007, 20:47
Always used them, never had an issue with corrosion, even on regs over 10 years old. Could people be looking for reasons that don't exist? Of course you have to pull them back every so often and look for signs of wear, but if you care for your gear, corrosion should not be an issue.

CompuDude
11-05-2007, 20:55
Always used them, never had an issue with corrosion, even on regs over 10 years old. Could people be looking for reasons that don't exist? Of course you have to pull them back every so often and look for signs of wear, but if you care for your gear, corrosion should not be an issue.

Plenty of stories exist where people weren't as lucky as you.

Each person has to ask... do you feel lucky?

You might get lucky, as you have, or you might not. Given the negligible-if-any benefit... why put yourself in that situation, given a choice?

kingfish
11-05-2007, 21:12
Well thanks again everyone.:smiley32:
I wont be putting any on any of my hoses.:)
Learn so much from this forum.

Jas.

Tableleg
11-06-2007, 10:48
...to think you're immune from rust just because it's fresh water would be a mistake. That is true of anything made out of iron or steal.

But aren't all the hose ends and connectors that are used in scuba equipment made out of stainless steal? I see the the '316 stainless' get thrown around a lot when talking about d-rings and such. Aren't these hose ends made out of the same stuff because of the environment these products are going to be put in?


316 [stainless steal] contains 16% chromium, 10% nickel and 2% molybdenum. The "moly" is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides (like sea water and de-icing salts)

It seems more likey that 'cheap' hoses that don't use proper materials are more likely to see corrosion rather than well constructed hoses (like the ones I'm assuming ST sells) in the environment they were designed for.

If thesmoothdome has a reg 10 years old with no signs of corrosion, that tells me that most scuba equipment is in fact constructed of proper materials. Granted, that can't be said for absolutely everything, but rust isn't something I'd worry about.

Salt crystal build up seems like a more valid concern due to it's abrasive nature on these rubber hoses. I think hose wear is a higher concern than rust at the fittings. Does this make sense?

philmayer
11-06-2007, 15:59
I have them because my reg setup came with them. I honestly hadn't given it much thought.



I've never considered it before either. I have a few on my regs, they came that way.

What is their intended purpose?

Tableleg
11-06-2007, 16:14
To relieve strain on the hoses right there at the connector. It's suppose to provide a 'more natural' curve and to prevent kinking there where the hose terminates.

PsychDiver
11-06-2007, 16:55
I have had a USD reg for 15 years with hose protectors. There is some corrosion under them but not bad. The hoses are in great shape. I could go either way.

WaScubaDude
11-06-2007, 17:32
Always used them, never had an issue with corrosion, even on regs over 10 years old. Could people be looking for reasons that don't exist? Of course you have to pull them back every so often and look for signs of wear, but if you care for your gear, corrosion should not be an issue.

Plenty of stories exist where people weren't as lucky as you.

Each person has to ask... do you feel lucky?

You might get lucky, as you have, or you might not. Given the negligible-if-any benefit... why put yourself in that situation, given a choice?

DO YOU FEEL LUCKY? WELL, DO YOU PUNK?

WaScubaDude
11-06-2007, 17:46
I cut all mine off. Found more corrosion (not rust) under the hose protectors then the hoses without. I feel lighter already!

Tableleg
11-06-2007, 21:15
I cut all mine off. Found more corrosion (not rust) under the hose protectors then the hoses without. I feel lighter already! What was corroding? The hose? The boot thing?

superkingkong
11-09-2007, 16:28
Although my reg has dried off, but when i slide off the hose protector, it's still wet inside. i would say, it will corrode sooner or later.

CaptainRon
11-09-2007, 20:55
Does anyone use anything on their hoses, such as a UV protectant to protect them? I just replaced my 25 year old regulator with a new one:smiley20: and wondering if I should be doing anything to make the hoses last longer.

superkingkong
11-09-2007, 21:05
dont dry it under the sun :)

Xspect
11-10-2007, 08:29
No hose protector for me either. I think the hide too much stuff. Proper cleaning and you should be fine

bubble-head
11-14-2007, 19:17
I don't like them, personally. I prefer to be able to see the hose ends.

RoadRacer1978
11-14-2007, 19:23
I'm still using the hose protectors. After cleaning my gear I pull the hose protectors away from the fittings to allow everthing to dry. Then I slip the protectors back into place. One day I may take them off, I really can't see a huge need for them and they do make it a pain to get everything dry.

mm2002
11-16-2007, 11:53
I can see the disadvantages for sure. I may remove ours. Things that make you go hmmmmmmmm.

WaScubaDude
11-16-2007, 11:59
I cut all mine off. Found more corrosion (not rust) under the hose protectors then the hoses without. I feel lighter already! What was corroding? The hose? The boot thing?

The "stainless" hose fightings have a bit of white corrosion and small pitting. The hoses that had no protector still look great.

r2t
11-16-2007, 12:16
I have had hose protectors on for the last 6 years, took them off the other day and the hose still look like brand new. I never did anything other then a garden hose rinse.

Krafcheck
11-16-2007, 12:25
If i were to get them for free I would use them but to me not worth the money. I once considred it for either my wife or I just because we got identical regulator sets. I got around it by leaving the yellow "hose tag" on hers until I put a different color mouth piece on one of the sets.

WaScubaDude
12-20-2007, 16:18
Just bought another Zeagle reg of Craigs List, found green currosion under the only hose protector. Went at it with a Sonicare tooth brush and tooth paste and it looks good now.

For sure no hose protector is the better way. ??

teog
12-25-2007, 21:47
Ive had my gear many years and dont have hose protectors.

trekkindave
09-09-2008, 10:54
OK.. how do you take the hose protectors off?? also those hose wraps.. how do i remove them

GIFFMANN
09-09-2008, 11:41
When I removed mine, I pulled the hose off of the 1st stage then just rotated the protectors til they came off. I suppose you could heat them up with a hair dryer or a heat gun (CAREFULLY) to help soften them up.

CompuDude
09-09-2008, 11:51
OK.. how do you take the hose protectors off?? also those hose wraps.. how do i remove them

Pull? Not sure about the hose wraps, but you just pull the protectors off. Try to minimize strain on the hose and connector, but in the end, you just pull the suckers right off. May slide easier when wet.

bubble-head
09-09-2008, 13:21
When I worked at my LDS, I had a "T" shaped tool that worked great. Basically it was a flat piece of metal that served as a handle and there was a nut welded to it in the center the hose screwed into. I sprayed a little Armor All on the hose and they'd slide right off or on. It should be a really easy tool to build.

cbope
09-15-2008, 06:12
Stainless steel is NOT rust-proof. It is far more resistant to corrosion than plain steel but even stainless steel will corrode given the right conditions such as being trapped between a hose protector and hose fitting for long periods of time.

Also, "hose protectors" are more correctly called strain reliefs. They "relieve" the "strain" at the ends of the hoses where they are attached to something and more likely to be bent at sharp angles.



...to think you're immune from rust just because it's fresh water would be a mistake. That is true of anything made out of iron or steal.

But aren't all the hose ends and connectors that are used in scuba equipment made out of stainless steal? I see the the '316 stainless' get thrown around a lot when talking about d-rings and such. Aren't these hose ends made out of the same stuff because of the environment these products are going to be put in?


316 [stainless steal] contains 16% chromium, 10% nickel and 2% molybdenum. The "moly" is added to help resist corrosion to chlorides (like sea water and de-icing salts)

It seems more likey that 'cheap' hoses that don't use proper materials are more likely to see corrosion rather than well constructed hoses (like the ones I'm assuming ST sells) in the environment they were designed for.

If thesmoothdome has a reg 10 years old with no signs of corrosion, that tells me that most scuba equipment is in fact constructed of proper materials. Granted, that can't be said for absolutely everything, but rust isn't something I'd worry about.

Salt crystal build up seems like a more valid concern due to it's abrasive nature on these rubber hoses. I think hose wear is a higher concern than rust at the fittings. Does this make sense?