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WaScubaDude
10-23-2007, 19:03
Titanium, platinum, gold...what is the best fn Reg and why?

Capt Hook
10-23-2007, 21:04
The one you are using because it keeps you alive. None of that other crap matters.

Jipps
10-23-2007, 23:08
I agree, the materials can help improve durability, but if you take care of it it will last you a long time regardless. Most important is that it works and keeps you alive.

Defman
10-24-2007, 07:37
Agreed, the one that is keeping me alive at the moment is the best reg ever!

Jipps
10-24-2007, 10:57
Titanium, platinum, gold...what is the best fn Reg and why?

But to get back to your original question, Titanium is GREAT in a second stage all the time. You can use it in a first stage too (atomic T2) for example. But with a titanium first stage you cant switch between air and nitrox at will.

ScubaToys Larry
10-24-2007, 11:35
Titanium, platinum, gold...what is the best fn Reg and why?

But to get back to your original question, Titanium is GREAT in a second stage all the time. You can use it in a first stage too (atomic T2) for example. But with a titanium first stage you cant switch between air and nitrox at will.

You can if you stay below 40%...

Thisshouldbeme
10-24-2007, 11:45
What is the reason for not being able to use nitrox on a titanium first stage? I was looking into getting one, but I want to nitrox dive.

Jipps
10-24-2007, 12:37
From what atomic told me, you can dive nitrox with it up to 40%, out of the box. But, if you run plain air through it you need to get it cleaned before running nitrox through it again. But if all you dive is nitrox, or clean air (technicaly a 21% mix) then you are ok.

mitsuguy
10-24-2007, 14:24
From what atomic told me, you can dive nitrox with it up to 40%, out of the box. But, if you run plain air through it you need to get it cleaned before running nitrox through it again. But if all you dive is nitrox, or clean air (technicaly a 21% mix) then you are ok.

I would love to know the reasoning behind this...

WaScubaDude
11-04-2007, 22:48
Titanium, platinum, gold...what is the best fn Reg and why?

But to get back to your original question, Titanium is GREAT in a second stage all the time. You can use it in a first stage too (atomic T2) for example. But with a titanium first stage you cant switch between air and nitrox at will.

You can if you stay below 40%...

Is there a great light and small titanium reg? Thinking travel reg here.

diversteve
11-05-2007, 00:08
A T2 is 1.8lbs. - 1st/2nd stage w/hose. It's pretty great..

Aussie
11-05-2007, 03:51
I think the best reg would be the best reg that breathes at the deepest point you dive or maybe the deepest you would like to dive one day. Performance is more important than looks and weight.

Aussie

Silverlode
11-05-2007, 05:39
I think the best reg would be the best reg that breathes at the deepest point you dive or maybe the deepest you would like to dive one day. Performance is more important than looks and weight.

Aussie

Agree with the above plus... if you can afford it.

Hey Aussie! Can't reply your PM.

Puffer Fish
11-05-2007, 06:23
I think the best reg would be the best reg that breathes at the deepest point you dive or maybe the deepest you would like to dive one day. Performance is more important than looks and weight.

Aussie
I would agree also... I got rid of a scubapro 650 this year, not because it does not breath great, but because it leaks when upside down, and I tend to spend a lot of time upside down...

ScubaJW
11-08-2007, 13:22
I have Poseidon jetstream odin, its outta this world. I have rented regulators and bought new regulators. I am not sure what the rentals were but it was terrible and uncomfortable to use. The regulator I bought years back is Cressi-sub Eclipse, I didn't like it because it was not easy to breath like Poseidon does. I will never go back! I love the ease of breathing and the vent is on the side, not in front of you with bubbles "blinding" your vision.

BSea
11-08-2007, 13:37
Titanium, platinum, gold...what is the best fn Reg and why?

But to get back to your original question, Titanium is GREAT in a second stage all the time. You can use it in a first stage too (atomic T2) for example. But with a titanium first stage you cant switch between air and nitrox at will.

You can if you stay below 40%...

From what i've been told, titanium will react with higher concetrations of O2. I seem to remember that someone using over 75% O2 had o-rings fail because the reg got so hot that the o-rings partially melted. I can't swear that this is true, only that it's something I heard. So as long as you were only going to use 40% or less, you should be fine. I doubt anyone uses over 40% on their primary gas. And if they are buying T2's for their deco tank, then they have more money than sense.

MSilvia
11-08-2007, 13:49
Yeah titanium isn't O2 compatible. As BSea mentioned, you probably wouldn't use the reg on any mix where it would matter, but IMHO it's silly to spend extra for a reg that introduces limitations a cheaper reg doesn't have.

MSilvia
11-08-2007, 13:52
A T2 is 1.8lbs. - 1st/2nd stage w/hose. It's pretty great..
I'm unclear on the advantage of having a lightweight regulator.

MSilvia
11-08-2007, 13:54
Titanium, platinum, gold...what is the best fn Reg and why?
Brass and stainless steel for me. I want reliability and performance, not a fashion show.

CaribbeanDiver
11-08-2007, 14:14
one of the factors to consider when purchasing a regulator is service. if you travel to dive, you best be sure you can get parts and service for your reg if you need it. otherwise, you will either rent or buy a new one or skip dives.
I dive scubapro regulators not only because of performance but because SP has dealers just about everywhere and service is never an issue.

Puffer Fish, my regs never leak when I am upside down; I wonder if that is a flaw only related to the 650.

fireflock
11-08-2007, 14:36
The companies that have huge dealer networks around the world like to push the network as a reason to buy from them. I'm not seeing the logic.

Think about this - how many times have you had a reg fail when you were traveling? Of those times, how often was it due to something other than a poor job getting it serviced? Of those times, how often did you miss any dives because you could not find another reg to use?

I guess what I'm saying is that I hear that line of reasoning a lot, but I don't see that getting parts in the middle of no where is a problem that comes up very often.

Another strategy, if you're still concerned, is to buy a parts kit and carry it with you. Scubapro does not make it easy to do that, but some other brands do.

When it comes to local service, I can name 4 or 5 places that are as far away as my local mailbox. Each of them sees more regs in a month than the average local shop probably sees in a year. I'm not saying you should not choose a local place for service, just pointing out that divers have options.

Rich


Rich

MSilvia
11-08-2007, 14:59
one of the factors to consider when purchasing a regulator is service.
Another factor to consider is ease of self-service. Lots of regulators require special tools to do something as simple as see how the diaphragm is seated. Others, like my Apeks regs, can be opened simply by twisting the faceplate and unscrewing it by hand. That can be handy for managing freeflows, rinsing out grit, or thoroughly drying the reg in preparation for cold water/ice dives.

Z-naught
12-02-2007, 06:19
I'm unclear on the advantage of having a lightweight regulator.Some people travel to places where there are rather severe weight constraints (imagine hiring a seaplane to take you to an extremely remote location where you need to take everything you need to dive and live with you). Such weight restrictions may leave you counting ounces. Lightweight, titanium alloy makes sense in those situations. Granted, not your usual diving, but a legitimate reason to buy titanium gear.


I want reliability and performance, not a fashion show.Some divers think that titanium = conspicuous consumption. For some people, that maybe an accurate assessment. However, for all the divers I've met who use titanium regulators, as well as myself, the decision to buy titanium gear was motivated entirely by practical concerns, such as weight savings, imperviousness to corrosion, and increased durability. Cost issues aside, titanium alloy offers many advantages, albeit some of which are marginally important to most divers. Regarding the cost issue, one can acquire any piece of titanium equipment relatively inexpensively if one just does a bit of comparative shopping (I think Scubatoys has a titanium Oceanic Delta 3 for 399.95.) If one considers used gear, a titanium reg can be purchased for even less. Hell, I once bought a new titanium regulator for $50 on eBay! Thus, titanium doesn't necessarily equal $$$.

As for usage, just follow the manufacturer's instructions (like not using them with EANx over 40%) and a titanium reg will serve admirably.

Cheers.

PsychDiver
12-02-2007, 08:23
For greater dependability and ease of breathing, choose a regulator that has been around a few years at least and has proven itself. Nowdays, most of the regulators of different materials or manufactures are pretty good. It is a matter of what you want to do with it, what you want to spend, and what you plan to do in the future. I have an old US Diver SEA that I bought 17 years ago. While it doesn't breath as easy as some of the newer regs, I would trust it to go deep. However, I recently bought a Apex XTX200 and love it.