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stranger
10-23-2007, 19:20
I'm wondering how you guys deal with taking pictures while floating back and forth in waves. I can understand if you're kneeling in the sand or are holding onto an anchor line, etc., but what about free floating?

FishFood
10-23-2007, 19:25
I dont. Tried it once. It was too tiring and frustrating. Have to have excellent timing. Camera took too long to focus? Oh well, try again next time :(

Where are you photographing that is this shallow?

DevilDiver
10-24-2007, 08:56
Timing and practice. Half press shutter button to lock focus and be ready. Not that bad with a little practice.

stranger
10-24-2007, 11:15
Where are you photographing that is this shallow?


it would generally be on the second dive of a day trip that has some tidal action between the coral.

BobArnold8265
10-24-2007, 12:53
Shooting with tide or even during a drift dive is difficult. Especially if you are a good diver and don't want to damage anything. I have seen a number of ocassions where a photographer will grab the coral as an anchor and it really steams me. But back to your question. In current, the best thing you can do is bump up your shutter speed, and either manually focus (if your set-up allows you too) or half press the shutter release so you're already in focus when you're ready to shoot.

If you are ready to buy a new camera (or lucky enough to have one already), they seem to be getting faster with quicker focusing and less shutter lag. Many also come with lens stabilizers that help you take sharp pictures even when the camera is moving.

My camera is an older model and although it takes absolutely wonderful pictures, its' focus and shutter lag performance is pretty bad. I think this year for Christmas, I'm going to pick up something new:smiley20:

gibson1525
10-25-2007, 07:50
In surge it's not too bad. Try and position yourself so that your subject is at the point where you stop moving forward and start moving backward. This should give you at least one second to focus and take the picture. Of course shooting moving fish this isn't always possible but it's a start.

stranger
10-26-2007, 16:31
i don't have any camera setup worth mentioning (yet). my wife is taking her checkout dives this weekend, so once she passes, i think we'll do a few dives together before i start equipping myself for u/w photography

RonFrank
10-26-2007, 16:49
I'm wondering how you guys deal with taking pictures while floating back and forth in waves. I can understand if you're kneeling in the sand or are holding onto an anchor line, etc., but what about free floating?

Floating back and forth in waves? So you are snorkeling? :smiley17:

I assume you are talking about surge.

First off, most photographer don't kneel in the sand, or hold onto an anchor line (or none I know do that). Photography requires good buoyancy. If you can't hang in surge, than work on it. It still requires timing, and that is where a fast camera can help. DSLR's will generally focus and shoot very quickly. If you are going for extreme macro in surge, than you will most likely get a lesson in frustration.

In strong current I generally do what I call drive by shooting. The fish are
moving along with you in most cases (they don't like swimming into strong current either!). I had a Huge Grey Angle fish hang out with me and my dive buddy in ripping current for at least 10 minutes. He was between us.

Here is a shot done is fairly heavy current.

http://www.scubaboard.com/gallery/data/2196/medium/Turtle_004_web.jpg

You can see that the background is blurry, that is us booking along. I was facing backwards, and shooting into the current. The only problem with this is you need to make sure you don't go slamming into something while facing away from the direction you are flying!

Someone else also pointed out, increasing shutter speed can help, but if you are using a camera that is slow to focus, and fire, than good luck with that. You really need a DSLR to do this type of shooting with any type of success rate. The good news is there are other options! :smiley20:

stranger
10-29-2007, 11:29
You really need a DSLR to do this type of shooting with any type of success rate. The good news is there are other options! :smiley20:


I have a Digital RebelXT but am hesitant about bringing it down with me. I'd really hate to have something happen to it since it's my primary camera for the other photography I do.

CompuDude
10-29-2007, 12:58
Higher shutter speed can help, where that's an option, as will better/faster cameras.

Other than that, it's really a matter of time and practice... and realizing that there are some limitations to what can be accomplished.

Puffer Fish
10-29-2007, 15:21
I'm wondering how you guys deal with taking pictures while floating back and forth in waves. I can understand if you're kneeling in the sand or are holding onto an anchor line, etc., but what about free floating?

Floating back and forth in waves? So you are snorkeling? :smiley17:

I assume you are talking about surge.

First off, most photographer don't kneel in the sand, or hold onto an anchor line (or none I know do that). Photography requires good buoyancy. If you can't hang in surge, than work on it. It still requires timing, and that is where a fast camera can help. DSLR's will generally focus and shoot very quickly. If you are going for extreme macro in surge, than you will most likely get a lesson in frustration.

In strong current I generally do what I call drive by shooting. The fish are
moving along with you in most cases (they don't like swimming into strong current either!). I had a Huge Grey Angle fish hang out with me and my dive buddy in ripping current for at least 10 minutes. He was between us.

Here is a shot done is fairly heavy current.

http://www.scubaboard.com/gallery/data/2196/medium/Turtle_004_web.jpg

You can see that the background is blurry, that is us booking along. I was facing backwards, and shooting into the current. The only problem with this is you need to make sure you don't go slamming into something while facing away from the direction you are flying!

Someone else also pointed out, increasing shutter speed can help, but if you are using a camera that is slow to focus, and fire, than good luck with that. You really need a DSLR to do this type of shooting with any type of success rate. The good news is there are other options! :smiley20:
I love the exposure here, and that feeling of movement...nice.

I use the stobe as a motion stopper... but the exposure is very tricky..just using it as a fill flash:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/Joyce1.jpg


Rather than then having the black hole look:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/HoggFish1.jpg

Puffer Fish
10-29-2007, 15:22
With the right point and shoot and a good strobe, it is reasonably easy.

Puffer Fish
10-29-2007, 15:25
You really need a DSLR to do this type of shooting with any type of success rate. The good news is there are other options! :smiley20:


I have a Digital RebelXT but am hesitant about bringing it down with me. I'd really hate to have something happen to it since it's my primary camera for the other photography I do.


Get the new fuji f series, their uw housing and a Inon strobe... 12 meg images, and the camera with housing is under $400, the strobe and arm will cost more.. i have two housing, they are so cheap. Never had one leak, but I have gone thru strobes. Deepest I have been is around 125 ft, not sure how much deeper it would still work.

RonFrank
10-29-2007, 15:36
With the right point and shoot and a good strobe, it is reasonably easy.

I've had good results with my Canon S70. However I get much better results with less work with my DSLR in, well most any situation.

The main issue with the DSLR is that you have to decide on what lens you are going to use, and then you are stuck with that choice. As always, if you are using a 60mm macro you will end up with a huge Manta Ray swimming five feet away, and you end up with eyeball shots! :smiley13:

NitroWill
10-29-2007, 15:44
Get the new fuji f series, their uw housing and a Inon strobe... 12 meg images, and the camera with housing is under $400, the strobe and arm will cost more.. i have two housing, they are so cheap. Never had one leak, but I have gone thru strobes. Deepest I have been is around 125 ft, not sure how much deeper it would still work.

Do you have a link to said camera? Fuji's site only lists a S,F,Z, and A series of cameras. Are they out yet?

Puffer Fish
10-29-2007, 15:52
Get the new fuji f series, their uw housing and a Inon strobe... 12 meg images, and the camera with housing is under $400, the strobe and arm will cost more.. i have two housing, they are so cheap. Never had one leak, but I have gone thru strobes. Deepest I have been is around 125 ft, not sure how much deeper it would still work.

Do you have a link to said camera? Fuji's site only lists a S,F,Z, and A series of cameras. Are they out yet?
Will get it tonight... along with the best prices I have seen.

Puffer Fish
10-29-2007, 15:59
With the right point and shoot and a good strobe, it is reasonably easy.

I've had good results with my Canon S70. However I get much better results with less work with my DSLR in, well most any situation.

The main issue with the DSLR is that you have to decide on what lens you are going to use, and then you are stuck with that choice. As always, if you are using a 60mm macro you will end up with a huge Manta Ray swimming five feet away, and you end up with eyeball shots! :smiley13:


The nice thing about the inon strobe is that it sync's with the camera's strobe, and that is one big improvement over your standard point and shoot. Also, the macro capability of the fuji is amazing...and if it leaks, I only have to drink one beer to get over it..instead of several cases. It has manual setting, so I have one setting set with fill flash and a switch to auto also... with one more for macro. Gives a lot of predone adjustments, but my favorite is two stops closed, with the flash filling in the two stops.

Puffer Fish
10-29-2007, 18:02
Ok, so here is the new Fuji (I have the F11, which has half the pixels, and about half the features, and is bigger)

http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/f/finepix_f50fd/index.html

Puffer Fish
10-29-2007, 18:19
Here is the Amazon price...
Amazon.com: Fujifilm Finepix F50fd 12MP Digital Camera with 3 x Optical Image Stabilization: Camera & Photo (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0002EQUIA/interactiveda8705-20)

And the UW case:

Amazon.com: Fujifilm WP-FXF50 Underwater Housing for Fuji F50fd Digital Cameras: Camera & Photo (http://www.amazon.com/Fujifilm-WP-FXF50-Underwater-Housing-Fuji/dp/B000UXBOVG/ref=acc_glance_foto_ai_110_1_tit/104-8406612-4094309)


All you need to add is the Inon strobe and arm...

Aussie
10-30-2007, 17:07
With the right point and shoot and a good strobe, it is reasonably easy.

I've had good results with my Canon S70. However I get much better results with less work with my DSLR in, well most any situation.

The main issue with the DSLR is that you have to decide on what lens you are going to use, and then you are stuck with that choice. As always, if you are using a 60mm macro you will end up with a huge Manta Ray swimming five feet away, and you end up with eyeball shots! :smiley13:

Eye ball shots:smilie39:

Know it well.

Sigma 17-70 Macro is a good all rounder.

But then again I love my 60mm Macro and I just got the 105mm Nikkor Macro also to play with.

Aussie

NitroWill
10-30-2007, 17:21
Here is the Amazon price...
Amazon.com: Fujifilm Finepix F50fd 12MP Digital Camera with 3 x Optical Image Stabilization: Camera & Photo (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0002EQUIA/interactiveda8705-20)

And the UW case:

Amazon.com: Fujifilm WP-FXF50 Underwater Housing for Fuji F50fd Digital Cameras: Camera & Photo (http://www.amazon.com/Fujifilm-WP-FXF50-Underwater-Housing-Fuji/dp/B000UXBOVG/ref=acc_glance_foto_ai_110_1_tit/104-8406612-4094309)


All you need to add is the Inon strobe and arm...

Thanks,
that doesnt seem like too bad a setup - especially for the price ($360 shipped for both)..

Another setup to consider!

bversteegh
10-31-2007, 00:50
I am a big Fuji fan - but I would recommend the E900 instead of the F50. It shoots manual and raw; lots of people shooting this camera very successfully underwater.

bversteegh
10-31-2007, 00:59
And shooting in surge - lots of people use the 1 finger technique. Find some dead coral or rock, and stabilize yourself by using your left index finger on the dead coral, it doesn't take much pressure to really help stabilize. Takes a little getting used too, and you need to have your rig pretty close to neutral bouyancy, or shooting one handed will make your wrist really sore by the end of the dive.

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 05:35
I am a big Fuji fan - but I would recommend the E900 instead of the F50. It shoots manual and raw; lots of people shooting this camera very successfully underwater.
They are discontinuing that camera (sadly, because I have seen some great pictures from it also). But it is almost twice the cost, and the image quality is not better.

The information lost not shooting raw is somewhat sad, but at least with Fuji, it is not as big a hatchet job as Nikon (for example) uses.

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 05:40
Here is the Amazon price...
Amazon.com: Fujifilm Finepix F50fd 12MP Digital Camera with 3 x Optical Image Stabilization: Camera & Photo (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0002EQUIA/interactiveda8705-20)

And the UW case:

Amazon.com: Fujifilm WP-FXF50 Underwater Housing for Fuji F50fd Digital Cameras: Camera & Photo (http://www.amazon.com/Fujifilm-WP-FXF50-Underwater-Housing-Fuji/dp/B000UXBOVG/ref=acc_glance_foto_ai_110_1_tit/104-8406612-4094309)


All you need to add is the Inon strobe and arm...

Thanks,
that doesnt seem like too bad a setup - especially for the price ($360 shipped for both)..

Another setup to consider!

The list of things you need will make for a very short list of camera's

Manual settings.

Low cost UW case

Long Battery life

High res sensor

Good lense

Low cost.

I would expect that there is a Canon with something at least close, and those cases are made for several Japanese MFG's...just don't know them that well.

CompuDude
10-31-2007, 10:46
The list of things you need will make for a very short list of camera's

Manual settings.

Low cost UW case

Long Battery life

High res sensor

Good lense

Low cost.

I would expect that there is a Canon with something at least close, and those cases are made for several Japanese MFG's...just don't know them that well.

I would add to that list a wide angle lens (well, 28mm... wide for a P&S size camera, at least) just to further narrow the list.... but that might just be me! :D

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 11:06
The list of things you need will make for a very short list of camera's

Manual settings.

Low cost UW case

Long Battery life

High res sensor

Good lense

Low cost.

I would expect that there is a Canon with something at least close, and those cases are made for several Japanese MFG's...just don't know them that well.

I would add to that list a wide angle lens (well, 28mm... wide for a P&S size camera, at least) just to further narrow the list.... but that might just be me! :D
Sadly, that is not that easy to get... so the 35mm will have to do... but I did leave off one important item:

A autofocus macro that covers a good range. Mine I believe is down to 2.8 inches.. and unlike a DSR, is just a button.. so you can almost instantly go from macro to normal.

Last year, while doing macro pictures, I got run over by a turtle.. big one... that for some reason wanted to swim right thru me ??? I only saw him seconds before I was rammed... but:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/turtle1.jpg

No time for setting... or focus.. or lighting...but at least I got a picture.

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 11:20
I really love some of the new DSR's, but, the cost, the risks and the time it takes is normally longer than I would like to spend.

One lesson I learned during my professional photographer days (Hey, one of my pictures of the 68 democratic convention made it to life mag, right before a mob ran me over, I got tear gassed and the police broke my camera), is that equipment is only half the story, and maybe not half. I was helping setup a photo shoot for a bunch of winner of a contest. They got whatever was the latest slr, and an afternoon to shoot pictures of the then supermodel Cheryl Tegues (not sure of last name spelling - sorry). At the same shoot, there was some famous photograph from New York (sorry, don't remember the name, but he was a student of Minor White) who was using a new compact camera.

What I learned was...

1. Those compact camera images were amazing.. because of the person using it.

2. Every picture of her was good... because I don't think one could have taken one that looked bad.

In the end, we all like the skilled pictures, with the cheap camera better.

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/Fred1.jpg

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 11:26
Sorry for the highjack... on the original issue. The picture of the person I posted, was in a more than 3 knot current (notice the bubbles). The strobe froze her (short duration), while the camera was actually set at a slow shutter speed.

It is, by far, the best method to get rid of blur..

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/Joyce1.jpg

RonFrank
10-31-2007, 11:36
is that equipment is only half the story, and maybe not half. ....there was some famous photograph from New York (sorry, don't remember the name, but he was a student of Minor White) who was using a new compact camera.

What I learned was...

1. Those compact camera images were amazing.. because of the person using it.

In the end, we all like the skilled pictures, with the cheap camera better.


I certainly agree that skill and talent are important in photography. However digital has changed things a bit in that a compact 35mm camera, and a high end SLR camera were both using the same media... film!

In digital, the tiny sensors in the PnS models will limit the final output size. It was a long time before mags were accepting ANY digitally shot image, and some still don't. One magazine I did an advertisement in would not accept images from anything less than a 10mpix DSLR. How would they know? They expected EXIF info intact, and said they would refuse the submission otherwise.... sheesh... go figure.

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 12:32
is that equipment is only half the story, and maybe not half. ....there was some famous photograph from New York (sorry, don't remember the name, but he was a student of Minor White) who was using a new compact camera.

What I learned was...

1. Those compact camera images were amazing.. because of the person using it.

In the end, we all like the skilled pictures, with the cheap camera better.


I certainly agree that skill and talent are important in photography. However digital has changed things a bit in that a compact 35mm camera, and a high end SLR camera were both using the same media... film!

In digital, the tiny sensors in the PnS models will limit the final output size. It was a long time before mags were accepting ANY digitally shot image, and some still don't. One magazine I did an advertisement in would not accept images from anything less than a 10mpix DSLR. How would they know? They expected EXIF info intact, and said they would refuse the submission otherwise.... sheesh... go figure.
Ron... you could not be more correct. I happen to like Fuji, because they use the largest of all the major makers, but it is still way too small, but not much smaller than some of Dslr's.

I wish it was practical to have a digital larger format camera... as that would make a lot more technical sense. But if it was, I would be even less likely to take it underwater.

Making a sensor smaller than we can accurately make lenses... just to have a large number is one of the great stupid things that happen when marketing wins over engineering.

If I were taking commercial images, then I would be using a high end Dslr... and all of the costs and risks that go with it. I just like taking nice pictures, and for that, I'm actually fairly happy.