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gibson1525
10-24-2007, 14:29
I've been looking at these for months and I recently put it on my Christmas list. Has anyone had any experience with the new Salt series from Spyderco?


:: Spyderco Product Details :: (http://spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=40)

Aussie
10-24-2007, 14:42
I've been looking at these for months and I recently put it on my Christmas list. Has anyone had any experience with the new Salt series from Spyderco?


:: Spyderco Product Details :: (http://spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=40)

Spyderco are high quality blade. I would be a bit concerned about the "it wont rust" claim. Maybe the blade wont rust but the pins or screws will. At rrp $85 I will stick with my EMS shears I bought for $2.

Aussie

gibson1525
10-24-2007, 15:06
good point, i never thought about the pivot pin. mmm....might have to rethink this. thanks

Aussie
10-24-2007, 15:23
good point, i never thought about the pivot pin. mmm....might have to rethink this. thanks

Seriously have a look at EMS shears. They are cheap so its not an issue if you loose them. They are stainless but the pins rust. I get about a year of constant use out of mine. Coat with vasso or silicon for extra protection. They cut through things easier than a knife.

Aussie

BobbyWombat
10-24-2007, 15:29
I'll second the support for Shears. I carry a knife too as it is better for getting through thick stuff by sawing through.

Spyderco makes great stuff. I'm sure you would be happy with it.

terrillja
10-24-2007, 15:31
I've been looking at these for months and I recently put it on my Christmas list. Has anyone had any experience with the new Salt series from Spyderco?


:: Spyderco Product Details :: (http://spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=40)

At that price, you are at about the cost of a titanium knife, which won't rust and holds a better edge.

If you want a folding knife for less than half the cost of the spyderco one, but in titanium, check this out:

Scubamax Titanium Folding Knife, Dive Knives, Scubamax, Scubamax Titanium Folding Knife (http://scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=kn700Ti)

or go with a full-size knife:

Titanium Blue Tang Knife, Dive Knives, Underwater Kinetics, Titanium Blue Tang Knife (http://scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=BlueTangT)

det4220
10-24-2007, 17:57
At that price, you are at about the cost of a titanium knife, which won't rust and holds a better edge.

If you want a folding knife for less than half the cost of the spyderco one, but in titanium, check this out:

Scubamax Titanium Folding Knife, Dive Knives, Scubamax, Scubamax Titanium Folding Knife (http://scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=kn700Ti)

or go with a full-size knife:

Titanium Blue Tang Knife, Dive Knives, Underwater Kinetics, Titanium Blue Tang Knife (http://scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=BlueTangT)

Titanium is a good material, but it is not even close to the edge holding of H1 or any good stainless steel. The advantages to titanium are weight, corrosion resistance, and magnetic signature. The disadvantages are wear resistance, edge holding, and toughness. It isn't a miracle metal. Titanium, just like other steels, has different grades. To get anywhere near the edgeholding of good stainless steels, you would need to use the beta titanium that mission knives uses, but those are between $300-$500. Other good "steels" in that compare favoribly to titanium are stellite and talonite, both of which are costly, corrosion proof, and usually only available in custom knives.

The Spyderco H1 steel is corrosion proof, it will not rust, but it will easily take and hold a better edge than titanium. It won't be as good as S30V, BG-42, VG-10 or the like, but I don't think it would be a stretch to say it is about the equal of ATS-34, which is pretty much the benchmark in knifemaking. Plus, the Spyderco has a 14mm opening hole, first made on the Spyderco Military, which is very easy to open with gloved hands. The lockbar has the Boye detent, making it nearly impossible to accidentaly close. Also, the pins, lockbar, etc, will either be made with H1 also, or a coated 400 series stainless. The knife will not rust. And if you ever have a problem, Spyderco's warranty service is top notch.

Just like with SCUBA stuff, you can pay full MSRP from a local dealer or pay about $60 though an online vendor.

terrillja
10-24-2007, 18:09
Titanium is a good material, but it is not even close to the edge holding of H1 or any good stainless steel. The advantages to titanium are weight, corrosion resistance, and magnetic signature. The disadvantages are wear resistance, edge holding, and toughness. It isn't a miracle metal. Titanium, just like other steels, has different grades. To get anywhere near the edgeholding of good stainless steels, you would need to use the beta titanium that mission knives uses, but those are between $300-$500. Other good "steels" in that compare favoribly to titanium are stellite and talonite, both of which are costly, corrosion proof, and usually only available in custom knives.

The Spyderco H1 steel is corrosion proof, it will not rust, but it will easily take and hold a better edge than titanium. It won't be as good as S30V, BG-42, VG-10 or the like, but I don't think it would be a stretch to say it is about the equal of ATS-34, which is pretty much the benchmark in knifemaking. Plus, the Spyderco has a 14mm opening hole, first made on the Spyderco Military, which is very easy to open with gloved hands. The lockbar has the Boye detent, making it nearly impossible to accidentaly close. Also, the pins, lockbar, etc, will either be made with H1 also, or a coated 400 series stainless. The knife will not rust. And if you ever have a problem, Spyderco's warranty service is top notch.

Just like with SCUBA stuff, you can pay full MSRP from a local dealer or pay about $60 though an online vendor.

Thanks for the info, I have never used a knife made from H1 before, but I had another stainless knife which dulled to almost nothing after practicing a bit on braided nylon 1/2" rope. My Ti knife has a sharp edge still after a decent amount of use, but it may be the difference in grades.

det4220
10-24-2007, 21:00
A lot of times poor quality stainless knives (cheap blade steel or poor heat treat) there are microscopic areas on the edge that will rust and pit out, leaving a dull blade where a titanium knife, even a cheap ti knife, will then feel sharper since the corrosion doesn't effect the edge the same.

There are a lot of good stainless steels, but those steels aren't very prevelent in diving knives. This is because the components like carbon that usually make the steel have better properties for a knife also decrease the stain resistance, so it's a trade off. The Spyderco H1 series knives, as well as the Benchmade X15 steel, are heads and shoulders above the stainless and titanium knives of the SCUBA companies. But, then again, that is all those companies do is make knives, it's not just an afterthought product. The trade off is that they are not usually purpose driven dive knives since the dive market is pretty small, they are usually marketed as dive, boat, SAR, swift water rescue, Personal Flotation Device, fishing utility knives.

marchand
10-24-2007, 22:23
I'm thinking about getting the benchmade knife. I have a similar one but made out of a different steel; it holds an edge really well but it rusts if I don't clean it after every dive. I think I will be very happy with it if I get it because all the other Benchmades I have are awesome, and that one wont rust.

emalebiga
02-21-2008, 23:36
Has anyone used a titanium coated knife?? I just picked up a cutter fish 400 stainless knife that is titanium coated. The only exposed steel is the blade. I am kinda wondering how well the titanium coat will hold up, and protect.

CompuDude
02-22-2008, 01:55
Has anyone used a titanium coated knife?? I just picked up a cutter fish 400 stainless knife that is titanium coated. The only exposed steel is the blade. I am kinda wondering how well the titanium coat will hold up, and protect.

The question is how well will the portion on the cutting surface of the blade hold up. And you have to sharpen it eventually... how will it look after that?

It should definitely help some, assuming they did a decent job of coating it. It's hard to say for certain how much without more detailed info.

cmburch
02-22-2008, 12:55
I do not know about knives, but the concept of Ti coated steel sounds good. I have used Ti coated drill bits for over 10 years and I like them. Tell me what you think about it after you get some use. I want to get a rust free knife. I hate disassembling and oiling all the time. And dread the day that I find that the steel has rusted under my handle. Thanks.

CompuDude
02-22-2008, 13:03
I do not know about knives, but the concept of Ti coated steel sounds good. I have used Ti coated drill bits for over 10 years and I like them. Tell me what you think about it after you get some use. I want to get a rust free knife. I hate disassembling and oiling all the time. And dread the day that I find that the steel has rusted under my handle. Thanks.

If you don't care about a razor sharp edge, just get a Ti knife. They're not that expensive. Don't muck around with coatings. And it's not that they're not sharp, it's just harder to maintain them as razor sharp.

If a razor sharp edge is really important to you, the SpyderCo H1 Salt series of knives is your best bet for blade quality and complete rust proofing.

cmburch
02-22-2008, 13:33
I do not know about knives, but the concept of Ti coated steel sounds good. I have used Ti coated drill bits for over 10 years and I like them. Tell me what you think about it after you get some use. I want to get a rust free knife. I hate disassembling and oiling all the time. And dread the day that I find that the steel has rusted under my handle. Thanks.

If you don't care about a razor sharp edge, just get a Ti knife. They're not that expensive. Don't muck around with coatings. And it's not that they're not sharp, it's just harder to maintain them as razor sharp.

If a razor sharp edge is really important to you, the SpyderCo H1 Salt series of knives is your best bet for blade quality and complete rust proofing.

Thanks, CompuDude.
I like Ti for its strength and weight for my bicycle and backpack gear. But I like good quality steel for knives. I like the concept of Ti bonded to steel. I will wait and see how it performs.

emalebiga
02-24-2008, 23:21
Has anyone used a titanium coated knife?? I just picked up a cutter fish 400 stainless knife that is titanium coated. The only exposed steel is the blade. I am kinda wondering how well the titanium coat will hold up, and protect.

The question is how well will the portion on the cutting surface of the blade hold up. And you have to sharpen it eventually... how will it look after that?

It should definitely help some, assuming they did a decent job of coating it. It's hard to say for certain how much without more detailed info.

Thanks I will definitively try and give an update about my ti coated knife after I have to sharpen it.

Z-naught
02-26-2008, 02:22
Titanium nitride (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium_nitride) (TiN) coatings are actually a type of ceramic, and are effective and widely used in many applications, particularly for increasing the lifespan of dies and other tooling. However, I'd be wary of using a TiN coated steel blade in a marine environment. The reason is that while such coatings are very hard (~85 RC) and immune to corrosion, they are also very thin and do in fact wear off over time. For that reason, and for ease of sharpening, most knives with a protective coating lack the coating on their edges. The edge of a knife blade is subjected to the most wear and tear and also is the part of the blade with the greatest surface area to volume ratio. A coating wouldn't last long there and the large surface area is highly vulnerable to corrosion. Such corrosion would have the effect of dulling the edge quite rapidly, due to deterioration of the edge's microstructure by oxidation. This process affects even inox alloys, only much less so than with carbon steels, and sometimes not at all if the inox alloy has had its carbon replaced with nitrogen, such as H1 steel. Of course, a titanium knife is completely immune to corrosion as well. If a beta alloy titanium knife is chosen, such as those produced by Ocean Master or Deep See/Wenoka, its edge retention will be superior to 300 series inox alloys as well.

It's my understanding that TiN coatings on knife blades are essentially a candy coating. They're used to preserve the cosmetic appearance of a knife, and do nothing to enhance the performance of blade, i.e. its ability to cut or remain sharp. Thus, I think the purchase of a beta alloy titanium knife or H1 stainless steel knife would be wisest.