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cfw218
10-24-2007, 21:14
Question for everyone: What is the best piece of advice your instructor gave you during your certification that wasn't in the book?

For me it was: Using yoga breathing to breath deeply and slowly - 3 counts in, 5 counts out. I found that anytime during my training that I started to feel panicky, this was a life saver. It cleared my head and I could think before I reacted (foolishly).

cheebaweebie
10-24-2007, 21:42
Try chasing down a big fish or fighting one on your line shaft from your speargun and see how quickly you forget to breath properly.

chace_nicole
10-24-2007, 21:57
Question for everyone: What is the best piece of advice your instructor gave you during your certification that wasn't in the book?

For me it was: Using yoga breathing to breath deeply and slowly - 3 counts in, 5 counts out. I found that anytime during my training that I started to feel panicky, this was a life saver. It cleared my head and I could think before I reacted (foolishly).

thats good advice, it clears more carbon dioxide & relaxes at the same time.

emcbride81
10-24-2007, 22:50
Prepare each dive as if you are the only one that will help you in an emergency is you. Do not depend on your buddy.

RikRaeder
10-25-2007, 07:44
An old standard useful in EVERYTHING. He asked...."what is the most important piece of equipment you carry with you?" I answered correctly as I've always believed it is true.

BobbyWombat
10-25-2007, 09:45
My instuctor held a special class to talk about the logistics and practical side of diving. He walked us through a hypothetical boat dive: what to expect, tips and tricks, etc... Really helped get me a bit better feeling about my first trip. The manual covered it topically, but he went into good detail about how to pick a buddy, how to not look like a yard sale when pulling your gear together, etc...

DiveSooner
11-01-2007, 08:42
Your brain... use it!

Understand basic tables/physics. Computers & equipment can fail. Stay calm.

Puffer Fish
11-01-2007, 09:14
Wow, that was so long ago...but what has stayed with me all these years is to expect anything... and react calmly.

I recently did a demonstration of that for a new diver, where we went for a swim and asked them to jerk my regulator out of my mouth, any time they wanted to...inhaling, exhaling..just don't let me know. It surprized them that you don't need to worry about that.

bubble-head
11-03-2007, 19:10
"No matter what happens, don't panic. Think things through and work through it. Panic kills divers more than anything else."

Kingpatzer
11-05-2007, 12:27
Before each dive, try to think of a reason you shouldn't dive. If you can come up with one, don't.

moosicman
11-05-2007, 12:32
i'm just now going through my cert. so this could change, but i thought some helpful information was avoid gaseous foods and carbonated drinks...

that is it so far...but more to come i'm sure

Miked
11-05-2007, 14:06
It's been a long time, but, Mine said: when things get "dicey"-"stop, think and breathe"-then address the problem.
(I must admit that he was somewhat miffed when I asked him " what if the problem is that: you can't breathe")

kyfriedchipper
11-05-2007, 15:22
I asked my DM "What if I have to barf at 50' underwater - what do I do?" - he said "just barf in your regulator" - it'll work out ok. I guess this is right - anyone ever had this happen to them? Other than instantly attracting fish for fish food, did it work???

DiveSooner
11-05-2007, 15:30
yes it works, put in your octo and clean your second stage reg....

Better yet, use your buddy's reg or octo......

Vegas
11-05-2007, 18:32
Mine said "Don't eat the dive boat chili." :)

quasimoto
11-05-2007, 19:34
I asked my DM "What if I have to barf at 50' underwater - what do I do?" - he said "just barf in your regulator" - it'll work out ok. I guess this is right - anyone ever had this happen to them? Other than instantly attracting fish for fish food, did it work???

Not the best feeling that I have ever had under water. Like mentioned above, let it rip and then clean out your reg. Just remember to keep your reg in your mouth till you are done letting it rip. It is human nature to breathe in after vomiting. If you take the reg out you might have more problems then just an upset stomach.
Heart burn is another thing that really hurts underwater. Not sure why but I felt 100% better once I surfaced.

moosicman
11-05-2007, 19:46
is this a frequent or some what common occurance at depth??

DiveSooner
11-05-2007, 20:11
My wife gets ill feeling just from boat rides, not matter what she takes... It is actually calmer, for the most part, under water... but she has gotten pretty good the ole ' barf and clean. Once done, she has a fine dive. besides, you get to see more fishes that way. ;-/

Ferrett
11-30-2007, 22:51
i had two good pieces of advice from my instructor
the first was you are your best dive buddy
and the second was dont wiggle your finger in front of the fishes

also try taking ginger tablets to stop sea sickness
they tested it on mythbusters and it worked better than any other method

navyhmc
12-01-2007, 00:07
Never go deep just to say you went deep. Always have a reason and a plan. and every plan shold have at least two back ups.

Daved
12-01-2007, 10:12
Plan,plan again oh--did I mention plan?
Ohh--she also did teach me about the dangers of mixing tequila and rum punch.

wtbscuba
12-09-2007, 14:10
I have vomited at 65 feet. When we got back on the boat my instructor had to make sure to point out that he was having a peaceful dive until he heard some unhuman sound, only to find me hurling!

The best advice I got from my instructor was is time tested recipe for rum punch!

ia2189
03-04-2008, 09:52
Solve any problem/issue on the surface. It will only get worse at depth underwater.

rfb3
03-04-2008, 10:09
Too long ago....???

rye_a
03-04-2008, 10:15
Great thread. I can't remember much of anything from my O/W course 18 years ago, but lots of helpful tips here!

DarinMartell
03-04-2008, 10:35
Mine had us practice breath holding. Said while you should NEVER hold your breath when you are or may begin accending in case of an AGE, you would be surprised at how many malfunctions can be fixed in less then a min of holding your breath and as long as you do not begin your accent it may be a viable option.

OTGav
03-14-2008, 06:32
Mine had excellent advice regarding wet suit rentals/purchase.

He told me that there were two kinds of divers.

Those that pee in their wet suit.

And those that lie and say they don't.

thor
03-14-2008, 11:56
My instructor had a list of every possible method of equalizing, from holding you're nose, to making odd faces. I'll have to post the list someday. He also told me the best place to buy a tank strobe for night dives. The dollar store. Use disposable glow sticks and zip ties.

ReefHound
03-14-2008, 14:05
Mine had us practice breath holding. Said while you should NEVER hold your breath when you are or may begin accending in case of an AGE, you would be surprised at how many malfunctions can be fixed in less then a min of holding your breath and as long as you do not begin your accent it may be a viable option.

I would never give that advice to a new student. While it's true that holding your breath is only a risk if you are ascending, and experienced divers often hold their breath (at various lung capacities, i.e. empty to help sink) it's too fine a nuance for newbies who have poor buoyancy control (and awareness). How often have you seen newbies floating up and they aren't even aware of it?

Crimediver
03-14-2008, 19:10
I started diving before you had to be certified so my first instructor wasn't an instructor but an experienced diver. He told me several things like exhale when rising in the water, Come up slowly, etc. But the one thing that stuck with me when I was worrying about sharks and cudas and stonefish were his words " I am the most dangerous thing in these waters".
I believed him.

EuphoriaII
04-03-2008, 16:22
Stay calm, use your brain, and practice your skills. Practice, practice, practice.

Also, while there are no scuba police, the rules are there for a reason. Because of that, I did not exceed the recommended 60 ft limit until I completed AOW.

terrillja
04-03-2008, 16:26
You will never know everything. 5000 dives later, you will still be learning. Never get complacent or too sure of yourself.

doczerothree
04-03-2008, 17:26
Don't eat Mexican food

Defman
04-03-2008, 17:28
Mine had excellent advice regarding wet suit rentals/purchase.

He told me that there were two kinds of divers.
Those that pee in their wet suit.
And those that lie and say they don't.


Expanding on the above:
OK to pee in a wetsuit, NOT OK to pee in a dry suit!

joemamma
09-25-2008, 01:00
i had two good pieces of advice from my instructor
the first was you are your best dive buddy
and the second was dont wiggle your finger in front of the fishes

also try taking ginger tablets to stop sea sickness
they tested it on mythbusters and it worked better than any other method

can vouch for the ginger cure! did wonders in key largo! without it i couldn't have dove the spiegle grove(perish the thought!) as we were in 7'-8' seas! with the ginger it was NO problem! and had the best dive of my life!:smiley20:

scubadiver888
09-25-2008, 08:20
The best advice I have received is, "it is not a race."

Mtrewyn
09-28-2008, 14:42
The best advice I have received is, "it is not a race."

There are a couple of people in my dive club that need to heed this advice.:smiley5:

I like to look around and take my time, and in local diving spots, it is REAL easy to lose your buddy 10 feet of vis is not much.

petronius
10-26-2008, 20:53
Mine had us practice breath holding. Said while you should NEVER hold your breath when you are or may begin accending in case of an AGE, you would be surprised at how many malfunctions can be fixed in less then a min of holding your breath and as long as you do not begin your accent it may be a viable option.

I would never give that advice to a new student. While it's true that holding your breath is only a risk if you are ascending, and experienced divers often hold their breath (at various lung capacities, i.e. empty to help sink) it's too fine a nuance for newbies who have poor buoyancy control (and awareness). How often have you seen newbies floating up and they aren't even aware of it?

I took that to mean holding your breath on the surface to see how much time you actually could go without a new influx of air. I figure that out on my own, one day - just randomly stopping breathing at various points, and I realized that I could actually get quite a lot done before I needed another inspiration.

Other than that, I agree - in-water breath-holding would hae seriously confused me in my OW class...

ThunderAce
01-01-2010, 17:33
#1 Breathe in, breathe out. Repeat as necessary.
#2 Blow bubbles, no troubles.
#3 Nitrogen loading BAD, Education Loading, GOOD.

inventor
01-01-2010, 17:35
#1 Breathe in, breathe out. Repeat as necessary.
#2 Blow bubbles, no troubles.
#3 Nitrogen loading BAD, Education Loading, GOOD.

Excellent advice, and funny!:smiley36:

ThunderAce
01-01-2010, 17:39
#1 Breathe in, breathe out. Repeat as necessary.
#2 Blow bubbles, no troubles.
#3 Nitrogen loading BAD, Education Loading, GOOD.

Excellent advice, and funny!:smiley36:


Thanks! I give credit the last two to my dive buddy / fellow OWSI Mick, he came up with those during our IDC.

#4 would be: Pray, to stay. <- while doing a reg recovery, after the arm sweep, he put both this hands together like praying...so you can find your reg easy, thus able to stay diving.