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View Full Version : Best advice you may not hear in training!



moosicman
10-28-2007, 23:15
Hey guys...

This thread is for all of you experienced ones that can REALLY help out us new fish....i've heard a ton of good advice...things that i may not hear in my cert. for example: watch out of the food that you eat before you go diving...you don't want to eat food that will give you gas.....or lay off carb. drinks...

so what i want to know is....what one or two pearls of wisdom can you offer that we wouldn't find out through certification....Can't wait to see what you have to say, and thanks for your experience and patients with us "dry" behind the ears newbs....

Krakenn
10-29-2007, 06:09
Be good to your mother.

Kraks

DougNR
10-29-2007, 06:41
Hey guys...

This thread is for all of you experienced ones that can REALLY help out us new fish....i've heard a ton of good advice...things that i may not hear in my cert. for example: watch out of the food that you eat before you go diving...you don't want to eat food that will give you gas.....or lay off carb. drinks...

so what i want to know is....what one or two pearls of wisdom can you offer that we wouldn't find out through certification....Can't wait to see what you have to say, and thanks for your experience and patients with us "dry" behind the ears newbs....

Resist the urge to "Badge up". Experience comes from diving, so dive your ass off and practice your current skills. Try to extend your skills in small increments each time you plan a dive. Take advanced courses when you begin to feel held back from what your next diving goal is. Repeat the process each time you move up a certification level.

Hang with more experienced divers and don't be afraid to ask questions. If you are put down for asking, you're in the wrong group - move on.

As your skills grow, share with others, and remember your early trepidations when you deal with new divers.

Doug

moosicman
10-29-2007, 08:14
that's it?? great advice from you two up there (especially you, kraks), but out of 20something views thats all the good advice??? say it aint so, joe!!!! are we all new???? *sniff*:(

ian
10-29-2007, 08:37
OK...I haven't got a ton of experience, but...

Dive and dive often. Diving is the only way you're going to get to be a better diver.

Buy your equipment early. Buy as much as you can and as much as you can afford. It will make you dive more than if you have to rent gear every time. You'll make mistakes with your gear purcahses, but they will be YOUR mistakes. Buy a replacement that works better. Sell the "bad" stuff and move on. I'm on my third BC and now have one I love.

Other will disagree with this, but ask around where you dive. Of the people who've been diving about 12 months, the ones who have more than 50 dives will likely have bought their own gear. That is the telling stat.

torrey
10-29-2007, 08:55
I'm not sure where it is, but there was a thread similar to this about a month or two ago. I believe it was several pages.

PlatypusMan
10-29-2007, 09:08
Argue at the surface, NEVER at depth.

If it doesn't feel right for whatever reason or no reason at all--DO NOT DIVE.

Do not allow yourself to be talked into a dive you're not comfortable with the idea of doing because it is beyond your immediate skill set.

Be kind to monotremes, for they are all-knowing and wise.

moosicman
10-29-2007, 09:12
I'm not sure where it is, but there was a thread similar to this about a month or two ago. I believe it was several pages.


got a link to that quote....?

in_cavediver
10-29-2007, 11:46
Here is the single best piece of advice:

We dive for fun and recreation. Remember that it is supposed to be fun.

Others to dive by:

Any person can call a dive at any time for any reason without fear of repercussions.

If your not comfortable before the dive, you won't be during the dive either.

Listen to your body - It tells you many things about your diving, but only if you listen.

Diving isn't a race to the bottom. Its a means to see what you want to see underwater. There is no shame in being a shallow water diver. Not everyone has to go to 200 feet.

Expierence is relative. 1000's of deep quarry dives don't make you ready for a 100' ocean dive. Likewise, 1000's of warm ocean dives (including deep ones) don't make you ready to cold deep quarry dives.

In the end, its all just a hobby.

torrey
10-29-2007, 12:14
I'm not sure where it is, but there was a thread similar to this about a month or two ago. I believe it was several pages.


got a link to that quote....?

Took me awhile, but I found it here (http://forum.scubatoys.com/general-scuba-training-questions/1804-what-advice-would-you-give.html)

No Misses
10-29-2007, 12:57
I learned this while sky diving. But, it applies to scuba as well.

When malfunctions occur, DO NOT PANIC! Think through the problem. There is always a solution. The trick is to figure it out. Donít make a snap decision. There is no rush. You have the rest of your life to solve this problem.

Other useful tid bits:
1) If you pee in your wetsuit, remember to crack the neck seal and "flush" before you get back on the boat.

2) The community mask bucket is full of other people's mucus. Carry a water bottle to rinse your own mask.

3) A thermos full of hot water can be your best friend, after a cold dive. Just crack your neck seal and pour it in :-)

4) It is important that all divers have a good sense of direction. If you are used to following other divers, you will not "test" your navigation skills. You and your buddy should alternate "who is leading and who is following".

5) Getting close to wildlife. I have seen numerous would-be photographers chasing thier subjects. Most wildlife gets nervous when you focus your attention on them. Most predators have binocular vision. If your subject sees that you are looking at them with both eyes, it may feel that it is being hunted. Watch you subject intermittently out of the corner of your eye until the shot presents itself. Instead of swimming directly at it, try to swim an intersecting course.

Good luck and happy diving.:smiley20:

DarkCoffee
10-29-2007, 13:06
Two:

* Its not a race. Slow down. It will do wonders for your air usage

* There are no 'little problems', just problems waiting to get worse at the worst possible time and usually, it seems, all at once.

RonFrank
10-29-2007, 13:08
You don't tug on Superman's cape
You don't spit into the wind
You don't pull the mask off the old Lone Ranger
And you don't mess around with Jim :smiley36:

My best advice, be a STILL diver grasshopper!


If you ever dive with a great diver, watch, and learn. They are generally horizontal. They can hover and hold their position at any depth without kicking. Their movements are deliberate and efficient.

All those attributes are a collection of practice, careful weighting and gear configuration, proper trim, good breathing skills, and excellent buoyancy.

Your lungs are your best BC device, learn to use them.

If you can not stop motionless without sinking, or floating up, you need more work on your buoyancy. Still divers only kick when they want to go forward or in reverse, not to control buoyancy. In current they drift effortlessly, and kick only if they want to hold a position in the current, or change direction.

Work on being a still diver, and you are working on the key things that are critical to become a good diver. Once you can achieve that type of control, challenge yourself by task loading. Still divers make task loading look easy UW. This is in part because that once one gains control UW, adding tasks becomes less of a problem as holding water postion is no longer a full time task, and becomes more of an auto pilot mode freeing the diver to focus on other things.

Another good chunk of advice is to learn the OW book. Really know it. Most skills needed to become a good, safe diver, and good buddy are there minus the experience. Outside of the blatant PADI advertisements (in the case of PADI), there is very little in the OW course materials that is fluff.

I'm always amazed at how many OW level questions are asked by new OW divers or OW students. Obviously some don't learn the material. A good instructor is also key, but learn that material. Remember everything is more difficult UW, so trying to remember how fast you can ascend, or what depth to do a Safety Stop should not be something one has to spend time thinking about.

RonFrank
10-29-2007, 13:38
Two:

* Its not a race. Slow down. It will do wonders for your air usage

* There are no 'little problems', just problems waiting to get worse at the worst possible time and usually, it seems, all at once.

Very true indeed. I find that most divers racing around do so mainly because if they stop kicking, they sink. I don't buddy well with those types as I like to go slow and take in the experience and scenery.

If one reads "Lessons for Life" (Scuba Diving mag), or in any of the Accidents and Incidents type forums it quickly becomes obvious that most tragedies or incidents are not a result of one problem, but a serious of small incidents that grow, and lead to panic, or poor judgment sometimes resulting in death.

Stop, Breath, Think, Act! :smiley2:

moosicman
10-29-2007, 19:59
thank you...those are great jewels of knowledge there....keep them coming....i and the other new folks appreciate it!

Kokomo
10-29-2007, 20:31
I've really enjoyed this thread! Great pieces of advice!

pnevai
10-29-2007, 21:48
search rocks are your friends

Scuba Steve
10-30-2007, 00:03
"Plan your dive and dive your plan." This will help prevent the unexpected.
"In everyday life, your elders provide advice. In scuba, your elders save your life." Basically, our elders teach us how to prevent and prepare for scuba accidents.

WaScubaDude
10-30-2007, 00:35
Find a mentor, Someone with way more experience that is willing to dive with you and offer helpful suggestions along the way.

Every dive, practice skills: Mask removal, air share, navigation.

Think thru what could go wrong and what you will do if it does.

Remember the surface is not your friend, resolve to solve problems underwater as much as possible, eliminate the urge to bolt to the surface.

Do a google search of bouyancy control, really practice bouyancy at reasonble depths. Good divers are always making small adjustments to their bouyancy.

know how to purge your bouyancy quickly! Practice before each assent.

Make a habit of always establishing positive bouyancy when at the surface, even on the boat or dock. Don't be a rock.

Buoyant1
10-31-2007, 11:31
Here is the single best piece of advice:

We dive for fun and recreation. Remember that it is supposed to be fun.

Others to dive by:

Any person can call a dive at any time for any reason without fear of repercussions.

If your not comfortable before the dive, you won't be during the dive either.

Listen to your body - It tells you many things about your diving, but only if you listen.

Diving isn't a race to the bottom. Its a means to see what you want to see underwater. There is no shame in being a shallow water diver. Not everyone has to go to 200 feet.

Expierence is relative. 1000's of deep quarry dives don't make you ready for a 100' ocean dive. Likewise, 1000's of warm ocean dives (including deep ones) don't make you ready to cold deep quarry dives.

In the end, its all just a hobby.


Good advice that!

Don't be afraid to call a dive, and don't give your buddy greif if HE calls a dive! it's a TEAM sport...both need to be there for each other.

Check your gear before descending, and check it again before descending, look at your buddy to make sure HIS gear looks good once you DO descend, and have him check you out...mini-micro bubbles MAY be a bigger problem waiting to happen...depending on where they come from.

If you're diving a 95 or larger with NITROX and your buddy is diving air in an 80, his NDL's and air supply turns the dive! no questions. You may come up with 1500 psi, oh well!

Listen to those that have been doing this...I learn a LOT by just listening!

Ask questions....read....keep learning. Don't try to learn something different or more advanced until you get the first set of skills cold...then wait a little longer to make sure....it's not a race to get more certification!

Dive a lot! Dive with people that you can learn from. If your LDS offers pool time, TAKE IT...if your LDS offers you to hang out on cert dives (as babysitters or "extra eyes" DO it!

Watch other people and learn from their successes AND mistakes!

But most of all enjoy it! Hope some of this helps! (you've taken the first step by asking questions!)

Buoyant1
10-31-2007, 11:36
--snip--

3) A thermos full of hot water can be your best friend, after a cold dive. Just crack your neck seal and pour it in :-)

--snip--
Good luck and happy diving.:smiley20:


Ummm...may want to qualify that...IF YOU'RE WEARING A WET SUIT! if you're in a dry suit...that may be wrong...:smilie39:

Sorry...couldn't resist! :smiley2:

Actually...that also reminded me of a story...last year one of my dive buddies did that to a guy who brought a thermos of HOT water...and scalded the poor boy! He felt bad about it...but the guy that brought the thermos ASKED for it!...(Whoops!) maybe check the temp first....

liuk3
11-01-2007, 10:32
Dive as much as you can with good people, and periodically review your course material whatever your certification level OW, AOW, Rescue, Master, DM, etc. in order to keep the info fresh in your mind as well as the skills.

quasimoto
11-03-2007, 16:07
Dive, dive and then dive some more. The most important thing is that you need to learn something from each dive.
Card don't mean crap..you can have 10 cards and be the worst diver ever.
Never dive beyond your skill level. If you are telling yourself that you shouldn't do it then you shouldn't do it. We all have that little voice in our head we just need to listen to it.
As mentioned before...enjoy.

WaScubaDude
11-03-2007, 16:20
Practice ditching your weights at the surface. Find a safe area (near the shore) where you can retrieve the weight or even on shore if need be. Practice ditching your weight and your DB's weight.

philmayer
11-06-2007, 22:13
Diving is not a competitive sport.

If you're not having fun, get out of the water.

You can learn something from every dive and every diver. Not all of it is good.

When you need to puke, leave your regulator in and puke through it. (It's actually easier than puking above water)