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gibson1525
10-30-2007, 08:08
is there a place here for a photo critique? i notice that nobody critiques in the photo gallery and i'd like a few opinions on some of my pics from you experts out there.

DevilDiver
10-30-2007, 08:27
If you post photos in the gallery there is a place for coments. When someone post a coment on your photo it should alert you if you have checked that setting in your options.... also there is a rating option viewers can choose for each photo.

(*** I would like to see a voting option added to the photo gallery. Maybe there could be a photo of the month contest.)

Please post photos, I try to look once a week or so to see what is new.

quasimoto
11-03-2007, 16:31
You could also attach it to your post and ask others to critique it. With all the opinions that are here I am sure that you can get the information that you want.

DevilDiver
11-03-2007, 19:25
gibson1525-
Post a couple of pics and let us have a look.......:smiley29:

Puffer Fish
11-03-2007, 20:18
gibson1525-
Post a couple of pics and let us have a look.......:smiley29:
I'm with Devil.... stick some up and we will all rip your heart out and hand it back to you...

Actually, as good is in the eye of the beholder... please don't try to take pictures like someone else would... rather, take pictures that you like.. and then get better at doing that.

Oh, and that was 250...

WV Diver
11-03-2007, 20:24
gibson1525-
Post a couple of pics and let us have a look.......:smiley29:
I'm with Devil.... stick some up and we will all rip your heart out and hand it back to you...

Actually, as good is in the eye of the beholder... please don't try to take pictures like someone else would... rather, take pictures that you like.. and then get better at doing that.

Oh, and that was 250...KA-Ching!!!


:ttiuwop:

gibson1525
11-03-2007, 20:38
ok here you are, let me know what you think. all pics were taken with a Sea & Sea dx-8000g with the ys-27-dx strobe.

http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/gibson1525/M0010165-small.jpg

gibson1525
11-03-2007, 20:39
http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/gibson1525/Montserrat-PillarCoral-small.jpg

gibson1525
11-03-2007, 20:39
http://i218.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/gibson1525/888-small.jpg

one of my favorites.

RoadRacer1978
11-03-2007, 21:28
I'm no expert, so I won't try to give any opinions. :) I like that last one as well. Really cool picture you captured there.

FishFood
11-03-2007, 21:37
Wow, that 2nd one screams feel me. Great texture shot...!

bversteegh
11-03-2007, 21:50
Ok - you asked for it; and I will try and help, not be mean:smiley20:

Photo 1 with the Goby, it is hard to find your subject. If your lens let you, you need to get closer for the small stuff. Also, good composition follows the rule of thirds - imaging a tic tac toe board on your photo, try and put your subject (usually the eyes of a critter) at one of the intersecting points. Your focus and lighting look fine.

Photo 2: Doesn't have a clear subject - if you are trying to show off the texture of the anenome/coral, you need to be closer. Unfortunately, my eye was drawn to the lower left of the picture, and that part of the picture has soft focus.

Photo 3 of the boat: I like it; has interest, decent composition. The only thing I would recommend is working on a general composition rule - never cut off both sides of image (unless you are doing a texture shot). I think the shot would be even better if you had a little more negative space (ie non-subject) on the left side (a little more of the mooring line shown) the front of the boat is really close to the edge of the frame - but that one is a definate keeper.

This will sound brutal, but it was taught to me by a guy who won underwater photographer of the year in 2005 from a major underwater photography group (Dr. Bob Whorton) - treat every shot like it is going in a portfolio you would show a client to sell your work. If it doesn't catch your interest or isn't technically correct (lighting/focus), don't try and salvage it - straight to the recycle bin. It will be hard at first - but I found that being demanding of yourself will help you improve faster. Study your good pictures (or pictures taken by others you like), and learn from them. The first year I started digital, I spent all my time trying to Photoshop mediocre pictures; instead of figuring out why they were mediocre, and taking better originals. HTH

Kokomo
11-03-2007, 22:08
Great pictures! I really like them. I'm not a photographer so I won't critique them.

wgt
11-04-2007, 11:31
Ultimately, self-criticism will be your most valuable weapon in relation to developing your skills, noting also that your computer monitor settings may be different from the monitor settings of the external critics – this may definitely diminish the ability of a third party to assess your material effectively. The first thing that you might like to try when criticizing your own images is to ask yourself a simple question: "What are the things that I did right?"

Let me give you examples of good answers to this question (some generated already by our peers above).

Image 1. The subject, though tiny, is readily visible. Details of the blenny are captured despite some probable limitations of the lens (e.g., this particular lens may be better suited to larger subjects, etc.). The color of the subject is well balanced in relation to his spongy home. In fact, the presentation almost allows us to treat the sponge as the subject with the blenny acting as a bit of spice -- very nicely achieved.

Image 2. FishFood accurately and perceptively analyzed the critical feature of this shot -- texture. I sense that you wisely let the current do the work for you, with the dancing tentacles of the pillar coral almost evoking music. It’s the whole scene that captures the eye -- again very well done.

Image 3. Not much needs to be said. It is a creative effort, with value added by some shameless commercial appeal. Kudos!

Please bear in mind these answers are by no means definitive, as others may be struck first by many of the other positive features of the images.

Once the positive features have been assessed, a second line of questioning is generated. Chief among these questions is, “What is the greatest weakness of the image?” Had I taken the pictures, my answers to this question might be:

Image 1. The sand in the upper right quadrant yields a shocking white. This diminishes the impact of the subject.

Image 2. The coral polyps may be excessively distributed throughout the image, which diminishes the depth.

Image 3. The clouds are perhaps a bit overpowering, but this is arguable.

Once a major weakness has been identified, then the next task is to identify an easy way to (attempt to) diminish that weakness, noting that it is not always feasible to execute the fix in the timeframe that the photographer has available.

Image 1. Try the shot again but from below the subject. This simply eliminates the sand from the image and maybe even creates a nice watery backdrop, but the specific location of the subject may preclude this effort.

Image 2. To add depth to the rolling fields of polyps, try to get a bit lower to the sea floor (as was the case for Image 1) and capture a bit of water or a few other creatures in the background. You will retain the virtues of your original image (again noting FishFood’s observation), while adding new dimensions of depth and interest. This excellent subject is not going anywhere, so take lots of shots from differing angles and be sure to fool with the camera settings, as systematically as you are able.


Image 3. The flaws in this image may be beyond the control of the photographer, with time of day and local weather dictating the intensity and direction of ambient light. Nevertheless, if time and air are available (at the end of the dive, I assume), then take several shots as the sun is variously exposed and hidden by clouds. You may stumble on a dramatic combination of variables that will enhance things even further.


Overall, your efforts are excellent, and you are probably going to gain considerable expertise as a self-critic in due time. As the time passes, the question remains, “How do I know whether I am improving?” Simple, one year from now, look at your most pleasing pictures taken recently. At that time, if you say to yourself, “This one is not a great as I remember,” then you are well on your way. You will have improved.


To emphasize the point appropriately raised by bversteegh, the quality of the original image will dictate the ultimate excellence of the final product. Therefore, a major obligation is to gain the skills necessary to increase the probability of capturing high-quality originals. A way to achieve this is to reduce the frequency of the errors that contributed to the weaknesses evident in your most recent photos.

After you’ve made some adjustments, please don’t be afraid to show us more of your work.

Puffer Fish
11-04-2007, 12:16
Ok - you asked for it; and I will try and help, not be mean:smiley20:

Photo 1 with the Goby, it is hard to find your subject. If your lens let you, you need to get closer for the small stuff. Also, good composition follows the rule of thirds - imaging a tic tac toe board on your photo, try and put your subject (usually the eyes of a critter) at one of the intersecting points. Your focus and lighting look fine.

Photo 2: Doesn't have a clear subject - if you are trying to show off the texture of the anenome/coral, you need to be closer. Unfortunately, my eye was drawn to the lower left of the picture, and that part of the picture has soft focus.

Photo 3 of the boat: I like it; has interest, decent composition. The only thing I would recommend is working on a general composition rule - never cut off both sides of image (unless you are doing a texture shot). I think the shot would be even better if you had a little more negative space (ie non-subject) on the left side (a little more of the mooring line shown) the front of the boat is really close to the edge of the frame - but that one is a definate keeper.

This will sound brutal, but it was taught to me by a guy who won underwater photographer of the year in 2005 from a major underwater photography group (Dr. Bob Whorton) - treat every shot like it is going in a portfolio you would show a client to sell your work. If it doesn't catch your interest or isn't technically correct (lighting/focus), don't try and salvage it - straight to the recycle bin. It will be hard at first - but I found that being demanding of yourself will help you improve faster. Study your good pictures (or pictures taken by others you like), and learn from them. The first year I started digital, I spent all my time trying to Photoshop mediocre pictures; instead of figuring out why they were mediocre, and taking better originals. HTH

Ok, I happen to agree with your comments... rather straight from the Minor White school of photography. Except that there can be lots of reasons for taking images....I collect pictures of fish I have seen...don't really care if the image is perfect, just so I have a record.

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/HoggFish1.jpg

I consider the above image a terrible exposure..but I was just getting a picture of the fish.

Sometimes, it happens that the fish just happen to be in a nice location:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/fish10.jpg

I also take shots of events...again, not for the photgraphic perfecton, but to remind me of what was going on (candid images, only under water).

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/Morrison1.jpg

And sometimes, I'm trying to actually take a good image... it is this last one that everyone seems to jump to.

That first image, of the little fish, was taken from the wrong angle, and was not close enough...but it is a great subject and an easy one to correct. It will still be just a snap shot, but one where the subject is the reason for the image. Getting those "perfect" shots, when underwater takes practice and some luck...as there are a lot of other task loading requirements... this guy is a similar size, but I could never get him to look at me:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/jawfish4.jpg

I would guess, that about 80% of my images any more, are for memories and not for art sake, and I actually now shoot images to use as screen savers and backgrounds...something I never would have done in the past.

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/PGbalconyview.jpg

gibson1525
11-04-2007, 15:58
thanks for all the great advice, exactly what i was looking for. considering this thread is now in the wrong place, i'll try and post a few more in the photo category for everyone to critique.