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FishFood
10-30-2007, 19:29
Theres an ad in my local area for "A Large Portable Oxygen Tank". Before I investigate this further is there any chance that this tank could be used as a scuba cylinder? Id go take a look but its 20 miles away... Id hate to go 40 miles for nothing.

terrillja
10-30-2007, 19:31
Theres an ad in my local area for "A Large Portable Oxygen Tank". Before I investigate this further is there any chance that this tank could be used as a scuba cylinder? Id go take a look but its 20 miles away... Id hate to go 40 miles for nothing.

It could be ok, but most O2 tanks I have seen are very narrow and long, and have a different valve, don't know if you could fit a scuba valve on there. I'd ask the height, diameter, and capacity of the tank.

mike_s
10-30-2007, 22:31
my very limited experience with o2 tanks is that they are lower pressure also. Like around 2000psi or 2040 psi or something like that.

Not that you couldn't use that for scuba, but that you'd have to deal with a bigger tank for the volume you'd want diving. Meaning it'd be better to just get a scuba tank. The o2 tank also has a differnet type valve. So you'd have to buy a new (or used valve). Considering a new valve is about $45 to $55, add that to the cost of the used o2 tank, add in a visual inspection (and maybe a hydro), and by the time you spent all that money, you could almost have a new scuba tank.

one other minor note, most medical o2 tanks are green or have a green top painted on them. This signifies o2 to whoever is filling it. That would be disruptive to people who might think it's an o2 tank and not fill it with regular air. So you might have to strip the tank.

just something to think about.

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 05:15
Theres an ad in my local area for "A Large Portable Oxygen Tank". Before I investigate this further is there any chance that this tank could be used as a scuba cylinder? Id go take a look but its 20 miles away... Id hate to go 40 miles for nothing.

Not something you would want to do...save the gas and get a good tank.

MSilvia
10-31-2007, 08:07
On the other hand, oxygen is among the best first aid measures for dive related injuries, so you might consider getting it to keep on the boat or in the car if you dive near home, and seeking O2 training from DAN.

No Misses
10-31-2007, 09:19
Whoa, stop right there. Not all tanks are created equal. I have SCUBA tanks, Medical O2 tanks and Industrial O2 tanks. I would not even consider using the O2 tank from my oxy-acetalene torch for anything other than cutting steel.

The moral of the story is:
-O2 tanks are not scuba tanks
-Scuba tanks can be used for O2, provided that they have been cleaned for O2 service.
-Medical O2 tanks are low pressure ~2000 psi. Thier valves and regs are not suitable for scuba use.
-Medical O2, Industrial Gas, and scuba tanks all have different/incompatable valve threads.
-Industial O2 is not suitable for breathing.

Puffer Fish
10-31-2007, 10:58
Whoa, stop right there. Not all tanks are created equal. I have SCUBA tanks, Medical O2 tanks and Industrial O2 tanks. I would not even consider using the O2 tank from my oxy-acetalene torch for anything other than cutting steel.

The moral of the story is:
-O2 tanks are not scuba tanks
-Scuba tanks can be used for O2, provided that they have been cleaned for O2 service.
-Medical O2 tanks are low pressure ~2000 psi. Thier valves and regs are not suitable for scuba use.
-Medical O2, Industrial Gas, and scuba tanks all have different/incompatable valve threads.
-Industial O2 is not suitable for breathing.
Thank you for doing a detailed explaination...although it is somewhat sad that you would have to.

kenmendes
10-31-2007, 11:05
I do believe that o2 tanks are taller and thinner and are less pressure but im not sure.

quasimoto
11-03-2007, 16:24
one other minor note, most medical o2 tanks are green or have a green top painted on them. This signifies o2 to whoever is filling it. That would be disruptive to people who might think it's an o2 tank and not fill it with regular air. So you might have to strip the tank.


Don't know from experience but the green top also changes colors when heated. Just a little extra info.

RoadRacer1978
11-03-2007, 20:29
Save your dough. Doesn't sound like what you need.

FishFood
11-03-2007, 20:38
Thanks Yall. That's what I figured, but didnt want a good deal to pass me up. Mike & No Misses, thanks for the good info!



Whoa, stop right there. Not all tanks are created equal. I have SCUBA tanks, Medical O2 tanks and Industrial O2 tanks. I would not even consider using the O2 tank from my oxy-acetalene torch for anything other than cutting steel.

The moral of the story is:
-O2 tanks are not scuba tanks
-Scuba tanks can be used for O2, provided that they have been cleaned for O2 service.
-Medical O2 tanks are low pressure ~2000 psi. Thier valves and regs are not suitable for scuba use.
-Medical O2, Industrial Gas, and scuba tanks all have different/incompatable valve threads.
-Industial O2 is not suitable for breathing.
Thank you for doing a detailed explaination...although it is somewhat sad that you would have to.

Why is it "sad"? Providing good info is "sad"? To be honest, providing a yes or no answer with ZERO evidence/reasoning is "sad" to me...

JahJahwarrior
11-04-2007, 00:24
My understanding is that the oxygen used by welders is often the same gas used for breathing.

But that's a very controversial subject :) Add to that the fact that a welder can use a higher grade of gas, and a diver shouldn't use a lower grade ;)


Many technical divers or divers in the boonies will have an o2 stage and an o2 kit, o2 stage for decompressing, o2 kit for when they get hit.

And it is definitely not going to work well to take a medical o2 bottle diving. Valve difference, size difference...just buy a scuba tank :)

Judge
11-04-2007, 01:15
First it sounds like it's a tank for oxy/acetelene torch set-up. Second, us welders do not use oxy. We use any but (you have to keep oxy out of the molten pool to avoid issues...if you want to know take a welding course).

in_cavediver
11-04-2007, 18:34
First it sounds like it's a tank for oxy/acetelene torch set-up. Second, us welders do not use oxy. We use any but (you have to keep oxy out of the molten pool to avoid issues...if you want to know take a welding course).

Judge,

The tank sounds like a small portable with the CGA 540 valve. Definitely not a good option for scuba unless you can find an old valve with the proper thread. (think its 1/2 taper NPT but don't quote)

Those bottles have lots of uses including Research grade, medical, aviation and welding uses. Note I said welding. Its not the electrical arc but the oxy-acetylene based welding where its used.

Now, can it be used for diving - probably. Great for an emergency o2 kit if you get med or aviator grade o2. Welding grade may be the exact same grade as well. Where I get gas - they use the same fill whips for aviation and welding. Med is different only due to the testing. (same main supply banks and same distillation tower though)

Still, for scuba tank - get scuba tank. Its a lot easier to deal with.

CompuDude
11-04-2007, 19:38
I would call first and ask the seller what it is that they have.

How many times have you read news reports about divers, where the report talks about "the diver's oxygen tank"? Lots of people simply have no idea what they are talking about.

Could be it's something you want, could be it's not. But without more info, I wouldn't make the drive.

JahJahwarrior
11-04-2007, 21:38
First it sounds like it's a tank for oxy/acetelene torch set-up. Second, us welders do not use oxy. We use any but (you have to keep oxy out of the molten pool to avoid issues...if you want to know take a welding course).

Your sentence makes no sense....can you explain? My dad is a welder (for fun, not for main income) and he uses oxygen and acetyline (sp?). He does not use "oxy." but he does use oxygen.

Other welders (mig, tig and whatnot) might only use 20.9% oxygen though :)

If it's a great price and you are thinking about setting up a car o2 kit, buy it! I'm keeping an eye out for cheap local oxygen supplies so I can keep a tank in the car. Someof the places I dive are inthe middle of nowhere, over an hour by car to a chamber.

Judge
11-05-2007, 11:43
The last thing you want to introduce in a weld joint is Oxygen. CO2, Argon, Helium....any inert gas yes.....unless he is welding with an oxy/acetelene torch (flame welding). The entire idea is to shield the molten pool from oxygen so it does not oxidize(sp). I run pure argon, unless it is thick aluminum then I use Helium.

scubarealtor
11-07-2007, 08:26
grandma uses medical oxygen and has about 6 bottles. she said i could take one one my dive trips. i don't know anything about the different types, but its seems like what she has would be perfect for first aid. any thoughts?

No Misses
11-07-2007, 09:12
scubarealtor, you are correct. Medical O2 (or aviator grade) is what you want to carry for O2 first aid. Just as a CYA (Cover Your Butt), you should consider taking O2 provider training. I am sure that there are 1 or 2 lawyers out there that could explain the limitations of the Good Samaritans Act, better than I can. My basic understanding is that you are covered as long as you do not attempt anything that you have not been trained for (ie: no tracheotomies performed like you saw on Bay WatchJ). O2 is considered a drug. You need a prescription and/or certification to purchase it. Administering O2 without training is legally risky. The training will teach you proper storage, handling, and use of O2.

I have taken Red Cross First Aid and DAN O2 provider training. I carry O2 on my boat.


P.S. I wrote this while listening to a conference call. I apologize, if it is a little scattered J