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lovesmexico615
11-01-2007, 13:19
How can I fix this? I thought that the housing would even out the camera, but no dice. Is there anything I can do to make the camera neutral?

RoadRacer1978
11-01-2007, 13:23
Is it really negative, or just a little negative? I would want mine just slightly negative so I could set it down on the bottom for certain shots without it floating off. If you need to add bouyancy to it you could add foam, like from a water noodle (pool toy) in small pieces around the edge or places it will not interfere with the function of the camera. You would just have to play with it to figure out the perfect amount. (of course like neoprene it will compress at depth and reduce the buoyancy).

Another idea would be to get a small bladder that will hold air and has a way to vent. You could attach it and use as a BCD for your camera.

lovesmexico615
11-01-2007, 13:35
Thanks for the ideas. I need to get it in a pool- check out how negative it really is. The camera itself sinks like a rock (I'm on my 2nd one... white water rafting took the life of the 1st). When I had it in the water yesterday it seemed like it was still really negative. I'll try the foam idea first... and I have my eye on a clip for my BC as well.

CompuDude
11-01-2007, 14:08
Foam is the most common solution I've seen. Big camera rigs get very negative. A little is good, IMO, but there is such a thing as too much!

I have a buddy who uses DivinyCell foam PVC buoyancy compensation for his rig, and wrote up a little bit about it here (http://www.ocdiving.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_view=core.ShowItem&g2_itemId=6020).

gibson1525
11-01-2007, 15:44
make sure you play with the balance in the pool when you're adding the foam. you don't want to get down on a dive a discover that the camera is unbalanced, could be really annoying.

MSilvia
11-01-2007, 16:16
Bear in mind if you use a closed cell foam that it will decrease in buoyancy as you get deeper.

lovesmexico615
11-01-2007, 16:44
Gotcha... I'll try to get some pool time in the next week.

Puffer Fish
11-01-2007, 17:30
Gotcha... I'll try to get some pool time in the next week.
Just a note, but don't forget about saltwater versus fresh water...

lovesmexico615
11-01-2007, 20:20
Right. So, thinking out loud here- if I try to get the camera a little more negative than I would want in fresh water, it will be *more* buoyant than that in salt water. Is that right? I know what I'm thinking, but I'm having trouble expressing it correctly.

Puffer Fish
11-01-2007, 20:25
Right. So, thinking out loud here- if I try to get the camera a little more negative than I would want in fresh water, it will be *more* buoyant than that in salt water. Is that right? I know what I'm thinking, but I'm having trouble expressing it correctly.

That is correct... it might even sink a bit in fresh water.. and slightly float or be neutral in salt. I have a floating camera, and have aweight made for it and don't attach it, but like that it will be above me when clipped to my should d-ring.

quasimoto
11-03-2007, 16:03
The pool noddles work great and are cheap. My cousins video has them on the light arms. They do compress a bit but nothing like neo. We did a test a couple months ago and at 114' there was little change.

lovesmexico615
11-03-2007, 23:00
The pool noddles work great and are cheap. My cousins video has them on the light arms. They do compress a bit but nothing like neo. We did a test a couple months ago and at 114' there was little change.

Cool. Just bought one to chop up and play with in the pool!

bversteegh
11-03-2007, 23:54
Ditto on the pool noodles - but get the ones with closed cell foam. The cheap Wally World noodles compress pretty bad.

My strobes are small enough that neoprene coozies fit on them - my rig doesn't need much to get neutral - and this offsets the weight of the strobe arms. The advantage here is the relatively big diameter of the strobes - so you get a lot of bouyancy