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GruPoo
11-04-2007, 22:03
I have only been down twice. You give them $70 and a few months latter you are dropping $250 for a card then a couple K. Classic addictive behavior, but I am hooked so here goes....

My wife and I would like to get a nice setup. We will be traveling divers for the most part. Mexico, the Caribbean and for some strange reason in five years I want to really see the Arctic. Will these work for us:

- Zeagle Brigade
- Zeagle Zena

- Zeagle Envoy Deluxe
- Zeagle Octo Z Combination Regulator/Inflator

- Oceanic Veo 100 Dive Computer Console


The BCDs and Envoy just seem to make sense. I like the idea of the combo octos; Simple is often best when things go odd. The computer is the big one. Go with an air (Oceanic Veo 100) then latter ebay them off and buy a Nitrox version?

So between my ramblings does any of what we are thinking here make sense? I open it up to you the masses. Educate me. :smiley31:

Thanks in advance.

Steve Scuba
11-04-2007, 22:20
From all the reviews and comments I've read on this site, you're zeagle setups are excellent.

As far as the computer goes, I can't give you a review, but I may help save some dough in the long run. The Veo 100 also comes in an NX model that does nitrox as well as air. I think the price difference is only around $50. So if you're not seeing the NX, call and ask for it, and save yourself some pain later on if you chose to do nitrox.

There are also some great deals on similar setups from ST, so you should definitely give them a call and see what they can put together for you. You will probably be shocked at the deals they can do.

Zenagirl
11-05-2007, 07:47
Sounds very similar to what my husband and I have and we're traveling divers.

Zeagle Ranger LTD
Zeagle Zena

Zeagle Flathead with Envoy octo
Zeagle Envoy with Envoy octo

Oceanic Datamax Pro+2
Aeris AI

I agree with buying a nitrox computer in the first place. You may not get enough back on ebay to make it worth going with an air only computer to start.

I don't believe that any of your choices would work for arctic diving. You'd need more lift than the Zena has for sure (the corset may interfere with a drysuit valve), and you'd definitely want environmentally sealed regs, which would knock everything (including your Octo Z) out as an option. The Brigade might work, but I'd guess more lift would be necessary for the gear required for the arctic (not sure though).

You could easily plan to rent a fully ice compatible rig for your arctic adventure and go with "warm water" rigs (like you have listed above) for the rest of your diving. That's the direction I'd go since the equipment for arctic diving is completely different than the rest of the diving you're planning to do.

For warm water diving, your setup should be nearly perfect! :)

Netsloth
11-05-2007, 07:55
I'd drop the combo inflator/octo unit in favor of an Envoy octo, but that's a matter of personal opinion, I suppose. I'd rather not have to figure out the mechanics of air-sharing with an OOA diver while trying to manage bouyancy control with a device that is in my mouth.

Oh, also...I don't imagine that you will be diving the same equipment in 5 years if you've progressed to the point that you are diving in arctic conditions.

GruPoo
11-05-2007, 10:50
...

Oh, also...I don't imagine that you will be diving the same equipment in 5 years if you've progressed to the point that you are diving in arctic conditions.

The Arctic thing is more like dream of mine. A very, very, very $$$ dream. Oh well, as midlife crises go this is better than trying to date 20 year olds! :smiley29: Besides I love my wife!

GruPoo
11-05-2007, 10:51
Sounds very similar to what my husband and I have and we're traveling divers.

....



So Zenagirl, I take it you like the BC? I really think my wife will but she is concerned about the zippers. Can you offer any thoughts?

Zenagirl
11-05-2007, 16:33
GruPoo, I'm definitely Zena's unofficial biggest fan, so I'll help if I can. The real advantage I think this BC has over other more traditional types is the corset design. Instead of having the cumberbun which basically holds the BC to the body, the Zena's design wraps the entire torso. That means there are no pressure points, you have 3 areas of adjustment (shoulders, hips, waist), and once it's tightened on your body it simply does not shift or move.

ScottZeagle said awhile back that Zeagle has never gotten a Zena back with a zipper problem, and after putting over 100 dives on my Zena, I can see why. It's a big plastic zipper and extremely tough. The other thing is that if the zipper ever did break, I can replace the front panels of my Zena for cheaper than buying a new BC. (But first I'd send it to Scott and complain!)

Big advantage to the Zena and other Zeagle BCs is the modular design. You can swap out parts to get a custom fit or for different diving conditions (bigger or smaller wings). You can also add pockets and attachments. If you gain or lose weight you don't have to get an entirely new BC, you can replace a panel or section and your BC will fit.

Disadvantage to a Zena...no pockets to speak of. This doesn't bother me as when I had a BC with pockets things would fall out so I never used it, but some folks like pockets. It's basically a corset with integrated weights and a wing. Simple, streamlined, easy, and (for me) very comfortable.

Like any BC, the Zena is NOT for everyone and I don't advocate that it is. I do suggest that ladies try a Zena if they can to see what they think. If it isn't for them, then move onto a Diva, or Alikii, or Selene, or Hera, or Lazer....or whatever. Just try as many as you can before you buy, that's the most important thing.

GruPoo
11-18-2007, 18:56
Thank you all for helping me out. We went with the list as is. We are slated to get wet December 14th!

navyhmc
11-18-2007, 19:28
One other item for your Artic dream: A full face mask!!! There is no other way to do it. Artic diving is definitely on the extreme side. there is no warm about it. Trying to dive artic with a regular regulator is hard to do due to the cold making it very difficult to keep a good bite on the mouth piece.

I did under the ice in '85 on a research team-about 100 miles north of Point Barrow. 15 of the coldest dives I never want to repeat.