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dagoml
11-12-2007, 00:21
Iīm in the process of chosing/buying my first regulator. I have loggeed 30 dives but all of them have been on rented gear. I already made an extensive investigation on BC's and am inclined to buy the zeagle brigade. It was relatively easy to compare BCs based on needs and features.

The chosing of the reg is a complete different story, at least for me. The rental gear I have used is modest but I have had no problem with it. I donīt really know how different a $180 reg feels against a $500 reg. Is it worth the difference? From a safety standpoint, is a cheaper reg more risky?

There are a lot of "patented systems", materials, valves and features out there, but I donīt have the experience to pick one. Iīd like to invest the minimum possible without putting my safety at jeopardy.

I dive mainly on warm water on 2 or 3 places in Mexico. No nitrox, double tanks or tech dives. I want to keep it simple for now.

Please advice.

dagoml
11-12-2007, 00:35
Another issue is the brand. I have visited 3 brick and mortar stores in Arizona. They all have limited brand availability and all claim that the brand they sell is the best. Which are really the top brands for regulators? Is there any model/brand I should stay away from?

chewyjr15
11-12-2007, 00:40
big difference between a 200 and 5-750 dollar reg. Main being breathability, but you also get into DVT, and enviornmentally sealed. As for what is the best reg and or company out their? personal prefference i guess. I have both a scubapro and an oceanic. Both good regs both great companys i could get either reg serviced most anywhere in the world thats why i choose them. becuase i do plan traveling and i wanted a reg and company that is recongnized and used all over the world.

ScubaToys Larry
11-12-2007, 05:05
Well, here's my take on regs.... First off - don't ever fall for that, "you should buy the most expensive one in the store - this is life support... you're at 100 feet and no air...."

Any reg is going to work, and the chance of any failure with one is not dependent on how much you paid for it, but how you treat it.

So that being said - what do you get when you spend more money? Some features. There are things like sealed regs for diving in temps below 40 degrees or so, there are adjustable regs, there are ones with metal this or plastic that.... and there is a little difference in "performance" and how they breathe. Equate that to a car - nice comfortable ride is how it breathes, performance is what it can do on the autobahn. So if you are never going to do dives to 150+ feet - basically you don't need to pay more money for performance... any reg has enough performance to go to 80 feet and deliver your air.

At different price points there are different regs I suggest based on budget and diving conditions. The Tusa RS-130 (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=TusaRS-130) is a great reg for the money, and other ones starting off on the "I don't want to sell my house to buy a reg" range are the Zeagle Envoy series, the Mares MR12 Abyss, and some others. Great performance and lot's of features, sealed, swivel, dvt, etc, then there is the Oceanic FDX10 Delta IV (http://http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?product_id=OceanicDeltaIVReg) which is an amazing reg.

So just go through the couch cushions, gather up all the change, and give us a call and we'll try to figure out what your needs are, then match that to a budget and a reg!

Zenagirl
11-12-2007, 07:12
I've been diving a "budget reg" (Zeagle Envoy) for the past 3 years and I have to tell you that it breathes as well at 13 feet as it does at 133 feet, and I've never had a problem with getting air. Not only that, but the Envoy got perfect scores in ScubaLab testing and breathed and performed better than many regulators 3x the cost.

Just goes to show that you don't need to spend a lot to get a lot with Zeagles!! :D

Xspect
11-12-2007, 17:41
I think you have to dive what is comfortable to you. and what you can afford

Hollywood703
11-13-2007, 13:48
I bought a Oceanic CDX5 First Stage (environmentally sealed) and a GT3 Regulator.....I wouldnt trade this regulator for anything...It was very cost effective, and I have dove with it in water in the upped 30's and to 130 ft...it is user selectable as far as breathing resistance. The Delta IV isthe newer model with more medal and a bit more weight

dagoml
11-24-2007, 11:28
Thanks for the advice. It has been really helpful to understand what to look for.

I have looked at the packages offered by ST and I have the 2nd list of questions:


* What is the difference (Performance wise) between a Diaphragm and a
piston reg?

* What is the difference between the Mares mr12 abyss, Mares Mr12
Rebel and the mares mr2 rebel?

* What do you think about the Aeris A1 Reg?

* Can I make a package of the zeagle brigade BC and a reg package?

* Can I change the zeagle scout for the brigade on the light weight travel
package?

* The 10% discunt for forum members apply on packages?

* What do I need to do to get a quote on these options?


THANKS for yor help

blue37
11-24-2007, 13:49
dagoml,

Give Joe or Larry a call... They can answer all your questions... believe me, you will be satisfied!

floater
11-24-2007, 14:40
I donīt really know how different a $180 reg feels against a $500 reg. Is it worth the difference? From a safety standpoint, is a cheaper reg more risky?

Probably not more risky if maintained properly, but it might breathe worse (on deeper dives at least).


Iīd like to invest the minimum possible without putting my safety at jeopardy.

I dive mainly on warm water on 2 or 3 places in Mexico. No nitrox, double tanks or tech dives. I want to keep it simple for now.

Please advice.

For warm water diving in recreational depths, you could probably get away with a cheap reg. Something simple and reliable; a lower end reg from a good quality brand perhaps. They are safe, but don't breathe as well.

Anyway, the obvious drawback is that if you later decide to get more into diving, say into deeper depths or cold water, you'll have to upgrade.

ScubaToys Larry
11-24-2007, 14:53
Thanks for the advice. It has been really helpful to understand what to look for.

I have looked at the packages offered by ST and I have the 2nd list of questions:


* What is the difference (Performance wise) between a Diaphragm and a
piston reg? Performance wise.. really nothing. Diaphragms are preferred for cold water - but either can be used in warm or cold - you just might have to add an environmental kit.

* What is the difference between the Mares mr12 abyss, Mares Mr12
Rebel and the mares mr2 rebel? MR2 is non-balanced, the MR12 is balanced - meaning better performance at depth or when the tank gets low. The rebel is a plastic body, the Abyss is a metal - great breathing reg... top of the line.

* What do you think about the Aeris A1 Reg?
The A1 is a entry level - non balanced- non adjustable reg. Functional - but not what you would call a "great reg".

* Can I make a package of the zeagle brigade BC and a reg package?
Sure... we can package out anything.

* Can I change the zeagle scout for the brigade on the light weight travel
package?
See above.

* The 10% discunt for forum members apply on packages?
Yes

* What do I need to do to get a quote on these options?
Call

THANKS for yor help

So there you go.. that should answer them for you!

CaptainRon
11-24-2007, 15:51
I have the Tusa RS-130 and love it. If you are just doing recreational diving like I do, I don't think you could go wrong with it. Adjustable and balanced....Check it out....

rfreddo
11-24-2007, 21:37
Ditto the positive feedback on the RS-130.

One comment though that may help newbies like me looking at a first reg. Before purchasing my RS-130 I did a lot of reading here on the ST board, and decided that the adjustable second stage was a must have. Then I got it in the lake for 5 or 6 dives in the 25' to 40' range post OW and was dissapointed that I couldn't feel any difference between one end of the adjustment spectrum and the other. So I figured I'd fallen for a marketing gimick and didn't touch the nob for the next few dives.

Then came AOW, and sitting on the platform at 60', I saw one of the more experienced divers in the group reach up and adjust his second stage. I decided to give it another try and was shocked at the difference it made. I tried it again at 90' and the difference was even more pronounced. I'm now a believer.

CaptainRon
11-24-2007, 21:51
I noticed a difference with the adjustment on my RS130 even at 10 feet when I used mine for the first time. Of course, I had been previously using a 30 year old Sportways regulator prior to getting this one.

Marcus
11-27-2007, 23:03
Zeagle regs are the best I've breathed at their price point. Phenom value in a regulator.

Grin
11-28-2007, 08:49
The one thing I think is worth making sure you get is the adjustable lever on the 2nd stage. I have no clue if it works the same on all regs as I have a Zeagle and it is my only experience. Anyway, what I'm talking about is: With the lever in the tighter position it doesn't freflow and breaths soemwhat harder, which is good for on the boat and shallow water. But when on the bottom you flip that levr back and it is very very obvious that you instantly can feel the regulator delivering air effortlessly. If you remove the reg from your mouth it may freeflow, but if you are switching to anothe reg or something you can simply tigthen up the reg by flipping the lever.
I free the reg up when I get to depth and tighten it back up as I get on the boat to keep it form freeflowing as I climb onboard. If you are swimming against current or spearfishing or anything that causes you to breath hard/work a little the ease of breathng thing is something I think you should seriously consider. I think itmakes a huge difference. I had a Sherwood Magnum before the Zeagles and that my only comparison. A good reliable reg, but defiantly not a good breather when compared to the Zeagles. The Zeagle Envoy deluxe has this lever feature. I had a Envoy and should have kept it. But I now have a Zeagle Flathead XP that is supposedly even better. I can't tell you as I never compared side by side.

Z-naught
12-04-2007, 20:58
I would advise that you buy an inexpensive piston based model to serve as your first regulator, preferably with a DIN connection. For recreational, warm water diving, a piston reg will be very robust and highly reliable. The DIN connection I think is clearly superior to the traditional yoke type, and if using cylinders without DIN valves (e.g. old rental tanks), you can use an inexpensive adaptor, so you have the best of both worlds. As you grow as a diver, the inexpensive first reg will likely be replaced in the future with a higher performing reg, but you need not sell your first one. Many divers use inexpensive but highly reliable regs for pony bottles, deco cylinders, or as back up regs. Thus, an affordable first reg can continue to provide good service well into a diver's career. However, if you decide not to continue diving (perish the thought!), your initial investment will have been relatively small. So, in short, buy an affordable and uncomplicated reg now, and use it for a pony reg/deco reg after you upgrade.


I already made an extensive investigation on BC's and am inclined to buy the zeagle brigade.As for BC, I strongly recommend you consider a backplate/wing rig. Nearly everyone trains with a jacket-style BC (aka "stab jacket"), which is quite a shame I think, as a backplate/wing system offers a great many advantages and few or no disadvantages compared to a jacket-type BC. A backplate + wing system is modular, amazingly customizable, very robust, very easy to travel with, subtracts weight from your belt, and gives you perfect trim in the water, among other virtues. Most divers buy a jacket-style BC as their first because that's all they know that exists. Once a diver learns about backplate/wing rigs and tries one however, that diver will more than likely buy one and rue the first purchase of a jacket-style BC. Such has been what I've observed. Personally, I was lucky enough to learn about backplate/wing rigs early on and bought one as my first BC. They are simply amazing. I suggest you check out these manufacturers: Agir-Brokk (http://www.agir-brokk.com/597a26c1-c854-49af-9ecc-a2feffda97ac-29.html), Hollis (http://hollisgear.com/Products/Buoyancy.aspx), Golem Gear (http://golemgear.com/), and Deep Sea Supply (https://www.deepseasupply.com/index.php?page=rigs). If I were buy another backplate/wing rig, I would seriously look at the Hollis line. Scubatoys will be carrying Hollis gear I believe, so you could apply your 10% discount and certificate if you'd like.

Happy shopping!

CaptainRon
12-05-2007, 14:55
As for BC, I strongly recommend you consider a backplate/wing rig. Nearly everyone trains with a jacket-style BC (aka "stab jacket"), which is quite a shame I think, as a backplate/wing system offers a great many advantages and few or no disadvantages compared to a jacket-type BC. A backplate + wing system is modular, amazingly customizable, very robust, very easy to travel with, subtracts weight from your belt, and gives you perfect trim in the water, among other virtues. Most divers buy a jacket-style BC as their first because that's all they know that exists. Once a diver learns about backplate/wing rigs and tries one however, that diver will more than likely buy one and rue the first purchase of a jacket-style BC.


I have used both and recently went back to a Jacket style. Much simpler to use. For recreational diving, there are no disadvantages to a jacket style. A disadvantage of the backplate/wing is you tend to lean forward on the surface where as the jacket allows you to float in a more upright position.

Z-naught
12-06-2007, 04:03
A disadvantage of the backplate/wing is you tend to lean forward on the surface

In my experience only an over inflated wing exerts a forward force on the surface. A properly inflated wing won't do that. Regardless, how important is surface stability as a characteristic in the overall value of a BC? In my opinion, so low as to be not worthy of consideration. After all, a BC is a diving device, not a buoy.


For recreational diving, there are no disadvantages to a jacket style.

Wow, that is a strange comment. I suppose if a jacket-style BC were the only kind in existence then there would be no disadvantages as there wouldn't be anything else to compare it to. To each his own of course, but when compared to a backplate/wing, I find a jacket-style BC has so many disadvantages as to make them obsolete. I suggest that those that are interested do their own research and try out both, but for a few examples of the advantages of a backplate/wing rig over a jacket-style BC:

- The back-mounted wing greatly facilitates the ideal, horizontal trim in the water, as opposed to the angled posture jacket-style BCs impose, which requires effort to counteract.
- The backplate takes weight off your belt and distributes it evenly across the most buoyant part of the body, the torso (lungs). Jacket-style BCs are usually a few pounds or more positively buoyant, requiring more weight to offset, and have less than ideal placement of buoyancy cells.
- A backplate/wing rig can be perfectly adjusted to the individual, something few jacket-style BCs can do.
- A backplate/wing rig is modular, allowing different wings to be used for different dives. Also, single or double cylinders can be used with equal comfort. Jacket-style BCs aren't modular, nor can they be optimized for a given type of diving. Also, who would dive doubles in a jacket-style BC?
- A backplate/wing rig doesn't constrict the diver like a jacket-style BC can with its wrap-around buoyancy cells, but instead almost suspends the diver from the wing by the webbing, granting a sense of "flying" and freedom that few jacket-style BCs can provide.
- A backplate/wing rig is a very simple and robust rig. It will likely never break or malfunction. Only the 2" webbing might potentially need repair (unlikely, the webbing is super tough), and if so, would only cost $15 or so to replace. Jacket-style BCs tend to be more complex and tend to be made of less robust materials (lots of plastic, not enough stainless steel).

I could go on, but it is plain that for any diver, recreational of otherwise, there are clear disadvantages to using a jacket-style BC when contrasted with a backplate/wing. Frankly, I'm mystified as to why everyone doesn't use a backplate/wing.

Zenagirl
12-06-2007, 07:32
There are those of us out there that have tried a BP/W and don't like them. I wouldn't buy one or dive one even if it were given to me free. I'll stick with my back-inflate Zeagle Zena.

I refuse to believe that any ONE configuration or piece of gear is superior to everything else out there. It might be YOUR opinion of what works best for YOU, but to say something is "Best" is just arrogant IMO.

I'm sorry if I come across as harsh, but I'm so tired of reading "BP/W's are superior, all jacket and back-inflate BC's suck", or "Jet Fins are the best fins, you'll die if you use splits".

Instead, I wish we would simply explain why we chose and like our own gear from a personal perspective. Then we should be encouraging newbies or people looking for different gear to TRY AS MANY DIFFERENT TYPES AND BRANDS as possible before buying.

det4220
12-06-2007, 08:54
Funny how a regulator thread can evolve into a BP/W vs. BC thread.:smiley32:

CaptainRon
12-06-2007, 11:11
- The back-mounted wing greatly facilitates the ideal, horizontal trim in the water, as opposed to the angled posture jacket-style BCs impose, which requires effort to counteract. When you are horizontal in the water while diving, the small amount of air in a jacket is located along the back of the jacket next to the tank, just like a wing.


- The backplate takes weight off your belt and distributes it evenly across the most buoyant part of the body, the torso (lungs). Jacket-style BCs are usually a few pounds or more positively buoyant, requiring more weight to offset, and have less than ideal placement of buoyancy cells. Only if you over inflate them. With proper weighting, they are neutral. And most popular jackets have weight integration.


- A backplate/wing rig can be perfectly adjusted to the individual, something few jacket-style BCs can do. There are many adjustments that can be made for jackets along with various sizes. Don't rely on the poorly fitting rental BCD you may have tried.


- A backplate/wing rig is modular, allowing different wings to be used for different dives. Also, single or double cylinders can be used with equal comfort. Jacket-style BCs aren't modular, nor can they be optimized for a given type of diving. Also, who would dive doubles in a jacket-style BC? Many jackets do have modular parts. As far as needing different wings and double cylinders, that sounds more complicated than "recreational diving" to me. I don't think most "recreational" type divers are diving doubles to start with, or at least I haven't seen them.


- A backplate/wing rig doesn't constrict the diver like a jacket-style BC can with its wrap-around buoyancy cells, but instead almost suspends the diver from the wing by the webbing, granting a sense of "flying" and freedom that few jacket-style BCs can provide. Again, if you are properly weighted, there is very little air in the jacket while diving and the air is in the back along both sides of the tank, just like a wing. The diver with a jacket is also suspended by the shoulder straps and the cumberbund. As far as squeezing, only if you improperly tighten the bladder around your body and use it to secure the jacket rather than using the cumberbund to secure it will you feel it squeezing, and then only if you WAY over inflate it. When properly worn, the bladder is always loose and does not squeeze.


- A backplate/wing rig is a very simple and robust rig. It will likely never break or malfunction. Only the 2" webbing might potentially need repair (unlikely, the webbing is super tough), and if so, would only cost $15 or so to replace. Jacket-style BCs tend to be more complex and tend to be made of less robust materials (lots of plastic, not enough stainless steel). I'm confused. Doesn't all the customization, adjustments, and ability to change components for different dives make a BP/W just a little more complicated than a jacket? As far as materials, I think my jacket is extremely well made, even more so than my wing.


I could go on, but it is plain that for any diver, recreational of otherwise, there are clear disadvantages to using a jacket-style BC when contrasted with a backplate/wing. Frankly, I'm mystified as to why everyone doesn't use a backplate/wing. Maybe some of us like to keep things simple when we are only doing "recreational" diving and are mystified why others feel the need to claim their equipment or type of diving is superior to other's. Of course, this is just my opinion. :smiley2:

If you prefer a BP/W, that is great. Each diver should use what meets his needs. I only expect those who are giving an opinion to give reasons why they use a particular piece of equipment for the type of diving they do rather than criticizing those who choose to use something different and might not be involved in the same type of diving. If someone asks for an opinion on BCD's, I tell what I like about my particular choice, but I don't criticize those who like something different or make it seem that choosing a BP/W would be a terrible mistake. If you like a BP/W, than that is the proper choice for you. I HAVE used both and I think the proper choice for me is my jacket and I am quite happy with it. I think, (and it is only my opinion) most divers who are very negative towards the jacket style have not used a properly adjusted jacket, or they are into more technical diving. when properly adjusted, jackets are very comfortable.

Diving gear is kind of like automobiles. Everyone has a different opinion on what style they prefer. Someone may always have to own the newest, fastest sports car out there, but there are still some of us who are happy to just drive our old reliable.......

Welcome to the board.

Z-naught
12-09-2007, 10:02
Funny how a regulator thread can evolve into a BP/W vs. BC thread.Indeed! Where there are divers there will be talk of BP/W vs. stab jackets. It's a law of nature. ;)


I only expect those who are giving an opinion to give reasons why they use a particular piece of equipment for the type of diving they do rather than criticizing those who choose to use something different and might not be involved in the same type of diving.

Speculating as to why more people do not use BP/wings and criticising people who do not use them are two completely different things. My post (hopefully) conveyed the former and not the latter. Moreover, being critical of equipment is quite different than condemning people for their choices. As I mentioned before, to each his own. I chimed in to contribute what I consider helpful advice. While I disagree with some of your statements regarding equipment, this particular thread isn't the place for a BP/wing vs. stab jacket debate. I think the OP has enough information to make an informed purchase.

Cheers

texarkandy
12-09-2007, 22:48
Getting back to the "first reg" conversation -

I've been out of diving for over 20 years & just got back in this past year - knowing we would be doing easy (shallow & warm) rec diving the first couple of years (since my buddy is my 13 y/o JOW) - I did go with the Tusa RS-130 in a set of packages Joe put together for us - no complaints so far - seem to be just fine for rec diving & well priced.

should I, or my JOW get into more advanced/technical/whatever diving in future years we'll know more then about what we might be looking for in regs with more features/capabilities - should we decide at some point to upgrade our primary regs, I figure the RS-130's will always be good to have for backups, loaners, or maybe even to replace our Octos on neck-bungee's should we decide to adopt a more DIR approach.

As to the stab-jacket/Bp-wing argument - we compromised & went with Zeagle back-inflates.

Just my 2 psi

tarheeldiver
12-10-2007, 17:22
Good post Zenagirl

Mycroft
12-10-2007, 20:20
When I was looking at Regs, I had come into some money, so while I didn't buy top of the line, I ended up getting a really good performing reg set. I got a Scubapro MK20 and G250 first and second stage. Years later, the MK20 was easily modifed to become a MK25. Some will criticiz emy choice of Odto, but I went with an Air II.

How good are they? Well, when I went to get a backup reg set for a liveaboard trip, I went on E-bay to find the same thing over again, (then had them serviced before taking them on the trip).

But the bottom line is that any reg is only as good as the person who services them! I am really picky about my service tech. The current one has 25+ years doing this BRAND of reg.

ScubaJW
12-10-2007, 22:33
I used to own Cressi-sub regulator set and currently own Poseidon jetstream odin. I can see the difference between those two based on the ease of breathing in depth and can handle cold water diving without freeflow. I will trust my life on Poseidon if I am going deeper than 80 ft than Cressi-sub.

SmknStang01
03-06-2008, 00:17
i am also looking into getting some gear on the cheap end... i am debating between the Tusa RS130 and the Mares MR12 Rebel...
Has anybody used either of these products, and if so i would love to hear a little more about them.

THanks guys!

DarinMartell
03-06-2008, 00:25
I was also looking at these two. I bought the Mares because it is a diaphram 1st stage and I dive lakes (muddy) and cooler water (not ice) and it gives it more protection (or so the wise people here have told me). I don't know 100% yet because I just got it and it has not been wet yet.

clayhabitat
03-27-2008, 19:59
I have been diving a Sherwood Oasis and love it. Now we are looking for a reg for my wife and we are considering the TUSA RS-130. I have one question. My Sherwood came with 2 deflectors so I could divert the bubbles from in front of my mask. Does the 130 have a similar feature?

UCFKnightDiver
03-27-2008, 20:06
It has a large exhast port which deflects it to the side I never have a broblem with bubbles in my face from that reg

FyVe
03-28-2008, 21:52
I bought a Oceanic CDX5 First Stage (environmentally sealed) and a GT3 Regulator.....I wouldnt trade this regulator for anything...It was very cost effective, and I have dove with it in water in the upped 30's and to 130 ft...it is user selectable as far as breathing resistance. The Delta IV isthe newer model with more medal and a bit more weight

this is a thing of beauty. i got one of the Cdx5 w/ GT3 regs for x-mas. i love it. breaths nice, is adjustable, looks good. on the other hand, i kind of want to keep the reg that my brother is selling now, the FDX10 Delta4 (bst plug) but he wants to sell it. i mainly want it due to the swivel at the 2nd stage, just looks like a very nice feature to have.

SHAGGY
03-29-2008, 08:00
I have been diving a Sherwood Oasis and love it. Now we are looking for a reg for my wife and we are considering the TUSA RS-130. I have one question. My Sherwood came with 2 deflectors so I could divert the bubbles from in front of my mask. Does the 130 have a similar feature?


I bought a Tusa RS-130 last year for my sons to use and I've used it a few times as well and I will have to say that it really held its own pretty deacently against my nearly $1,000 Atomic ST-1, that I use at work,. In comparing the two,... The ST-1 has alot of frills and new cutting edge features, and space age materials, but you pay dearly for them. I really like the swivel on the ST-1, but from what I've read on here is a miflex hose would give alot of freedom of movement too, which would in the end be just as good as the swivel on the ST-1. I think that ST will put those on any new reg you buy from them. Bottom line,... I am extremely happy with the RS-130 and I may buy another pretty soon for my other son to use.

shaggy

beperkins
10-16-2008, 11:18
I have a Zeagle Envoy setup and a Cressi Ellipse Titanium setup and they have both been excellent for me. I wonder if there are any truly poor new regs being made out there. It seems that I cannot even tell a difference between my instructors $1000 Scubapro reg and the crappiest dive shop rental out there.

firenwater
11-08-2008, 19:20
Soon after completing my cert, I decided to buy my own gear. I did some reading (scuba diving magazines) and settled on an xs scuba sea air trimetal that got good reviews as a reg that delivered high performance of a muscle reg at a fair price. Now I wonder if I should have purchased a different brand. I only got a chance to use it a few times before the water got too cold for me. It seems fine except it hurts my mouth a bit. Anybody have experience with this reg? Did I do OK? I try to pick gear I can't outgrow even though I am a novice.

firemedic8082
11-14-2008, 20:07
I have dove the Mares R2 Rebel down to about 90 feet with no problems. I just ordered a Zeagle Flathead VI....you can get either for a great deal from scubatoys.

James1010
11-14-2008, 20:50
I have a good old fashioned US Divers Regulator that I love and works great for me.

nrembis
11-15-2008, 04:12
I'm still using my original scubapro Mk10/G250 I bought when I got certified in 1989....not bad 20 years and still going strong....I think scubapro makes an excellent quality reg.....

teerlkay
11-19-2008, 12:29
the alpha 8 deal on ST right now is hard to beat

Oceanic Alpha 8 CDX5 regulator reviews and discounts, Oceanic (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=Oceanic_Alpha_8_CDX5_regulat or)

monant
11-19-2008, 13:20
Don't forget to look at the ST used regulators. I bought used Zeagle Flathead VI and I still swear ST made a mistake and sent me a new one. No scratches, no scuffs, and it even smelled new. In my case, I wonder if used meant taken from a box to show a customer. They don't advertise it with their used regs, but they also sent a free reg bag.

The used Flathead VI is a premium reg at a budget price. It's also the easiest breathing reg I've ever used. It's almost like a free flowing regulator without the constant flow.

Rockhound76
11-19-2008, 15:38
Soon after completing my cert, I decided to buy my own gear. I did some reading (scuba diving magazines) and settled on an xs scuba sea air trimetal that got good reviews as a reg that delivered high performance of a muscle reg at a fair price. Now I wonder if I should have purchased a different brand. I only got a chance to use it a few times before the water got too cold for me. It seems fine except it hurts my mouth a bit. Anybody have experience with this reg? Did I do OK? I try to pick gear I can't outgrow even though I am a novice.

My son dives the SeaAir Trimetal and likes it. I tried it, as well and think it's a great reg. If your mouth hurts, you probably need to change out the mouthpiece for one of the moldable ones. They work great. The only problem he had with his was that the second stage adjustment was too stiff. This was corrected on his first service.

For a "first reg" you don't have to buy the best, but I would suggest you buy quality and something that can be easily serviced.

1) Piston or diaphragm makes no difference for warm/cool water diving. I've owned both. Pistons are available with environmental seals.

2) I'd recommend an adjustable 2nd stage. This can come in handy when facing a stiff current when you find yourself at odd attitudes.

3) Lightweight is good, if the materials are quality.

4) DIN is up and coming, but yokes are the most common in the states.


As for brands, I've owned Scubapro (1976), Sherwood (1978), Seapro (1976), Oceanic (1984) and USD (2000). Of these regs, the Oceanic, the Scubapro and the USD have been the best performing and most reliable. A year or two back, I finally decided not to do an annual on the SP and the Oceanic to save a few bucks. Both were great regs, I just got tired of the poor service on both the SP and the Oceanic where I live (this was an LDS complaint, not about the manufacturer).

My primary is the USD, which is the higher end Legend LX ACD reg and I love it. You DO NOT have to have a reg in this class to be a safe and happy divers. Any of the regs Larry recommends, any of the ones on my list, including my son's SeaAir Trimetal, would be great.

Now....about my deadly split fins....