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Puffer Fish
11-26-2007, 12:45
I hate to do two threads at a time, but as I am taking pictures with strobes anyway... might as well get this started.

I'm going to cover settings... what to look for in a strobe and specific problems, but first a small rant about specifications on these things:

If you have a Point and Shoot, then you need strobe that can mimic the preflash, not just ignore it.

For reasons I do not understand, this information is hard to get from the flash companies....

The lone exception is INON, but it is very valuable.

Why, because with the remote strobe firing, it will cause your camera to reduce the size of the flash, reducing batter usage,reduce the heat buildup and shortening the recycle time. And all are very good things.

The problem I have is finding out which do and which don't and how much of a flash that preflash is. So if someone knows that information, please post it..

DevilDiver
11-26-2007, 18:17
I am not sure if this covers all of the information you want but i have found this helpful. Check out this webpage and you should get a pretty good idea of the features offered on alot of the strobes on the market...........

Read to the left side of the page for links to a great article on strobes and an email adress for questions.

Underwater Strobe Comparison Guide - Digital Diver Network (http://www.digitaldiver.net/strobes.php)

Good luck!!

dbh
11-26-2007, 18:21
This should help some. Mfgs. seem to keep some info to themselves.

Underwater Strobe Comparison Guide - Digital Diver Network (http://www.digitaldiver.net/strobes.php)

Dave

Soonerwink
11-26-2007, 19:38
On my Oly sp350 I just set it to slave strobe with the lowest setting for the camera flash. I have only used it once but it seemed to work quite well.

Puffer Fish
11-26-2007, 20:29
This should help some. Mfgs. seem to keep some info to themselves.

Underwater Strobe Comparison Guide - Digital Diver Network (http://www.digitaldiver.net/strobes.php)

Dave


Dave, the problem with that listing, and most other ones, is the issue of "Mimic" and just what that means.... With Inon... they use a very strong preflash to cause the camera to use it's lowest flash output... what and how do the other's do it?

Reading the Hartenberger site information, some strobes seem to be too slow to do this correctly....

As the biggest issue with a P+S is after you get by the the preflash issue, is how the camera will fire, this would seem to be very important...

Puffer Fish
11-27-2007, 12:31
I will have pictures tonight (sorry, was busy), but several words about using a P+S with a strobe.

The way a P+S works is to pick a set of settings, say 1/60 of a second @ F5.6 and then fire a preflash and measure the amount of light.

With a lot of light coming back to the camera, the flash duration is very short... with less light, the camera will increase the duration of the flash. It will do that, up to the point it completely dumps all the energy in it's capacitors.

The recycle time is fastest and the power usage is least when the strobe time is the shortest.

Problems:

If you use an external strobe, and block out the in-camera one from getting back to the camera (to reduce backscatter), the camera's strobe will be firing at maximum on every shot. Not good from a recycle time, battery usage and heat point of view.

That is where the mimic part comes in.. the strobe now flashes with the preflash and the camera thinks it is getting light back from camera and turns down the in camera strobe. Assuming it has the correct timing.

Getting a "skip the preflash" strobe is not good enough.

Problem is, don't know any details on most of the strobes except the INON, because the makers don't provide it, and most people don't know the details (me included)

Puffer Fish
11-27-2007, 12:40
Assuming you have a working strobe system, there is one other problem... back to the 1/60 second shutter speed. (it is the default fuji setting, for example).

Part of this is to allow time for the possibly long flash time and any timing issues between the shutter speed and the strobe.

But what if it is so light, that 1/60 of a second is too light? This goes back to using the lowest ISO setting and setting the camera with F8 (if you have it).

But even then, in shallow clear water, during the middle of the day, there will still be too much light...so no strobe is possible (a DSLR would not have this issue, by the way). Other than that, you will have a mix of outside light and the strobe

bversteegh
11-28-2007, 00:21
Follow the link below to Heinrich Weikamp's website - it has a good explanation of how different camera's control the strobe exposure calculation; and includes a table with measured pulse duration for several cameras.

HeinrichsWeikamp GbR (http://www.heinrichsweikamp.net)

He builds an after-market TTL converter that is pretty sweet, BTW.

Puffer Fish
11-28-2007, 04:24
Follow the link below to Heinrich Weikamp's website - it has a good explanation of how different camera's control the strobe exposure calculation; and includes a table with measured pulse duration for several cameras.

HeinrichsWeikamp GbR (http://www.heinrichsweikamp.net)

He builds an after-market TTL converter that is pretty sweet, BTW.


He has absolutely amazing technology...which has to be installed in the strobe... and is pricy, but works great...

I have always been surprised that it was not being used by a major strobe mfg in a line of strobes...

Still does not address which strobes come with a preflash.

Puffer Fish
11-29-2007, 14:49
Been doing other stuff, but time to add some information.

Strobes are the one area where DSLR excel. Any point and shoot camera is going to have issues. You may be able to get around them, but it takes so thinking to do.

With a point and shoot, the usual default flash shutter speed is 1/60... that is because the amount of light put out by the in camera strobe is adjusted by changing the amount of time the stobe is "on".

So, you are starting with a shutter that is letting a lot of light in.

Next, many P+S don't have more than 2 f-stops... around 3 to around 5 is common.

The combination results in shooting,before the flash goes off, with 1/60th at say F 4. With an overcast sky, and ISO200 setting, that is a complete exposure, without the flash.... putting the flash in results in over exposure.

Also a 1/60 of a second is easy to get a blurry image, if you move at all.

For the above reasons, having a larger F range is important, as is a lower ISO number. Image stabilization also comes in handy.

Ideally, you would shoot at ISO 100 or lower, with the highest F number you have.. F8 is a nice number. That is about as good as you can do with a point and shoot.

There are three primary ways to use a strobe:

1. Flood flash, where the strobe is providing all you can see... backgrounds will be dark:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/HoggFish1.jpg

Not a big fan of this style.. but sometimes one has to use it, and if there is no water in view, works reasonably well.

2. Fill flash, where the flash lightens the area in front of you, but the water is still seen as, well water:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/fish36.jpg

3. And lastly, just to provide color and the right focus on things:

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/fish10.jpg

Only the fish had any strobe light on it.

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j98/garinj/butterfly2a.jpg


To do the last two, you have to balance the sun light with the amount the strobe puts out, and you may have to use a different f-stop.

It may also be, that with the 1/60 you have to use, it is not possible to actualy take a goo

tbg0519
01-05-2008, 14:48
OK, so let me ask the experts. I've got a canon SD 750 with housing and flash diffuser. Will I need a strobe as well, or will that depend on the range of my shots and amount of light? I haven't dove with it yet to play around, so I'm just trying to get feedback. If I do need a strobe, which one do you recommend to use with the canon housings? (or should I play around with my existing stuff first)

Puffer Fish
01-06-2008, 10:41
OK, so let me ask the experts. I've got a canon SD 750 with housing and flash diffuser. Will I need a strobe as well, or will that depend on the range of my shots and amount of light? I haven't dove with it yet to play around, so I'm just trying to get feedback. If I do need a strobe, which one do you recommend to use with the canon housings? (or should I play around with my existing stuff first)

If you want good pictures, in all kinds of conditions, you need an external strobe. Without it, backscatter will be a major issue, and not using the strobe will produce images without any red, unless you are in shallow, clear water.

The problem with strobes is two issues:

1. Cost... boy, are they a hit on the wallet, and because you need a tray and arms, and double hit.

2. Which is the right one to buy...you will notice the links to "comparisons" of strobes, but how effect some of these features are and how they compare is difficult information to find.

I'll post what I know about this next, but it is still missiing some information.

Puffer Fish
01-06-2008, 11:18
So what is the right strobe to get with a P+S?

Based on what I have used and can get from testing, there are essentially 4 possible technologies (that I have found so far).

1. A simple strobe that ignores the "preflash" P&S send out first to measure light, and then fire on the second burst. These are manually adjusted strobes. The Reef Master SL960D is one of these...as is the S&S YS27. You have to adjust the strobe for conditions on every picture, with distance being the most critical. As the camera's flash is blocked, the camera will make every flash at maximum output, which can cause reduced battery life, heat in the case and longer recycle times. I have two SL960D's, by the way.

2. The external strobe flashes with the preflash, but it does it at a fixed output. This causes the camera to think it is seeing it's flash and reduces the output of the main flash. Reduces heat, saves batteries and you get a shorter recycle time...but you still have to adjust the output of the strobe.

3. Some sort or external automatic light measurement. Inon is an example of this. They do a major preflash (so the camera only flashes the smallest amount) and then measures the light coming back to the strobe for control. This works, as long as the camera to object and strobe to object are roughly the same.

Note: There are several remote sensor that go on the housing to do this more accurately, but this starts getting very costly.

4. The strobe preflashes with the camera, and when the camera has enough light, it also shuts off, then uses that for the setting for the strobe. In effect, this is using the camera's reading to set the strobe. The S&S YS 110 works this way. The down side is the macro images will tend to be over exposed (the strobe cannot turn down enough), and you have to manually turn the strobe down.

There is the new SL961 has some sort of automatic system, but don't know which one, or exactly how it works. There is a Epoque 230 DS, again, the printed information is not very good. There is also another strobe that looks very much like the Reef Master (uses some identical parts) that says it does the same.

What I see as almost as big of an issue, is that the quality of construction and other features also mean a lot. I just bought a YS-110 from ST, and while it has some really funky o-ring maintenance requirement, is one really nice made piece of equipement... and it does indeed work. If I had the money, I would get one of each type, just so I understood the differences.

One additional note: The YS-110 has a focus light, so you can see where it is pointed...while I don't have a major issue with this, it is great to have...

Now I just need to add that second strobe to this package.....I can feel the pain already.

Puffer Fish
01-14-2008, 09:40
Update: I have had the chance to go thru the SL961 strobe's design.

It appears to have the following differences from the SL960D:

1. Gone is the dumb battery holder. They now insert into a built in space... much better I think

2. The seal and latch are basically the same... but they have some very specific o-ring directions... which are pretty much the opposite of everyone else.

3. The fiber optic connection to the strobe is greatly improved....almost like it.

4. The connection to a P&S camera is reasonable, but the cable can be easily pulled out (same as it was), but the velcro attachment system seem reasonable now.

5. It has an auto fuction that uses a sensor in the strobe... this works in general, but if the object to camera versus the object to strobe is different, it will not work. Setup correctly, and it should work, and their adjustment system (stobe settings and EV camera changes should work reasonably well.

In the low cost strobe area, this one should be a much better keeper for them. And if you have their camera already, a good choice.

Puffer Fish
01-23-2008, 12:36
I just got my second YS110 strobe...will post land pictures with them this evening, trying to fool them.

Will be a couple of weeks before I will have a chance to do UW images, but just playing with them, I was shocked at how well they work... I was unable to get a bad exposure from 30 ft to 4 inches. Surprisingly, they seem to cover a much wider distance range than the built in flash.

Note: for those that don't know, it is typical of TTL system to have a range they work in, and then have to be adjusted down manually for macro. I'm guessing that extreme macro, that will still be the case.

Puffer Fish
01-24-2008, 07:53
My first pictures are of a difficult image - textured, round and dark colored.

All of the images involved resizing only, no attempt at any other processing.

These first to are with a single strobe:

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/meduim_flash_high.jpg

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/single_flash_medium.jpg

Only difference is the position of the single strobe head.. lower versus higher.

Puffer Fish
01-24-2008, 18:43
Here are three dual strobe images:

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/dual_strobe_1.jpg

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/dual_flash_2.jpg

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/dual_strobe_3.jpg

Which is better??? Don't have a clue, but they are all different. Please ask, if you would like to know how.

RoyN
01-26-2008, 21:12
You know Puffer, I've been using 1/125 of a second, think I should go up to 1/60?

Puffer Fish
01-27-2008, 18:09
You know Puffer, I've been using 1/125 of a second, think I should go up to 1/60?


Roy, thanks for asking the question. I will post some images shortly of the same scene, using ambient light as part of the exposure. I think you will see that it depends on what you are trying to do.

Remember, you have, or should have, control over focus (both center point and range), over the overall lighting, over stopping motion, and over the relation ship of how the background is to the primary subject.

My camera defaults to 1/60... because it has image stabilization and as with most digital camera's, controls the amount of light via the length of the strobe, and longer is cheaper than stronger. These are all low cost solutions, not quality ones.

As a default setting, I would make an argument that a 1/125 is a better setting, because in allows easier adjustement up or down, and the 1/60 allows a lot of ambient light in. Also going down one stop to 1/30 is not that practical (if you want crisp images).

Remember, you take ISO, f stop and shutter to control the exposure. Add strobe to that and you have a tremendous number of potential adjustments. Just look at the next set of images.

Puffer Fish
01-27-2008, 20:35
Roy, here is a strobe image taken with 1/1000. There was reasonable amount of ambient light, and doing this cut that way down, also, had there been something moving, it would have stopped the motion.

The amount of light in the room is typical of what you would have at 30 to 60 ft (depending), just that there was still red in the light here.

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/strobe_test_1.jpg

Puffer Fish
01-27-2008, 20:38
So here is going overboard on letting ambient light in:

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/strobe_test_7.jpg

Notice that the background is washed out, but the object is reasonably exposed.

These were taken, by the way, within minutes of each other.

Puffer Fish
01-27-2008, 20:42
So here is half way in the middle.. more than dark, less than washout.

There is one other change in this image that is not obvious.

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/strobe_test_6.jpg

Puffer Fish
01-27-2008, 21:04
That last image was taken with one strobe... because the light is coming in from the right side:

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/4/5/5/strobe_test_4.jpg

This is what you get with both strobes.

RoyN
01-27-2008, 21:08
Which is the one that is 1/60...

Here is one of the shots I took. My exposure was at 1/125

http://inlinethumb64.webshots.com/33151/2844610730101309303S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2844610730101309303rSjPvf)

http://inlinethumb62.webshots.com/21181/2938144130101309303S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2938144130101309303ItoXmv)

You could barely see the metridiums in the background there on the right hand corner which I really want them to show up also. I know it depends on the visibility, but on that day this picture was taken, it was good.

Here is the information from the camera:

Make: OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Model: SP320
F stop: F/8.0
Exposure: 1/125 sec.
Focal length: 8.0 mm
Flash: flash fired, compulsory flash mode (9)
Metering mode: pattern (5)
Dimensions: 1280x960


I'm trying to make the image look like this one here taken by Kawika, my "former" local underwater photographer. As you can see, he's got the hydrocorals and the ones in that rear pinnacle nicely light up. Think is it possible to do a shot like that with a single strobe?

http://www.coldwaterimages.com/img/hydrocoral8.jpg

http://www.coldwaterimages.com/img/reef0.jpg

Unfortunately, I sold my camera and probably be going back into my canon once I get those college funds fix and maybe get a drysuit.

RoyN
01-27-2008, 21:13
Also, here is anothe picture I took which didn't seem to light up the place.

http://inlinethumb29.webshots.com/29404/2209697800101309303S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2209697800101309303jCXMrr)

And here is his picture again, I really like the nice background there, I don't know if he is using a dual strobe or not, can't ask him though....

http://www.coldwaterimages.com/img/lingcod0.JPG

Puffer Fish
01-28-2008, 07:10
I particularly like that last image (ok, it is a bit of fish butt picture, but I still like the composition and exposure)...partially because it is so difficult to take (moving fish against a 3D background)

The fact that you can ask the question means you are 90% of the way there...

Regarding if those images could be taken with a single strobe - yes they could have been - but they would have taken some very careful strobe placement.

Puffer Fish
01-28-2008, 07:47
Roy, the issue is not just the 1/125 versus 1/60, it is about the total combination of settings.

Your image was shot at a 1/125, at F8 (don't know the iso setting).

F8 would give you great depth of field, but if you cannot see that, it was wasted.

Did not mean to bring this up here, but as you were nice enough to ask,

In general, to do a fill flash, you need to stay within 2 exposure units of what the image would take without a flash. But you need to be aware of how your camera is measuring the exposure - typically you have at least:

1. Spot (only the very center of the image is measured and moving the camera around will show lots of variation.
2. Average (exactly what it says, but beware using this, as some areas may be over or under exposed, and the "average" still be good)
3. Center weighted. (Sort of the average between one and two)

I like to use spot, but you have move the "spot" around so you understand just how much variation there is in the image (look at the background to see the exposure needs, and then to the subject). Any one can work, but the way you use them varies.

So, from the first image, you could have:

1. Changed the F8 down at least 4 units.

2. Increased the exposure by one unit.

3. Most likely have been able to change the ISO by one unit.

That would give you an image at 1/60, F2.8 and say ISO 200. If, and only if the spot reading of the back Metri's was within that value, could you take the image and have them correctly exposed. (actually, within one unit would do.)

You would have to greatly turn down your strobe, or the center would be washed out.

You would also get the advantage that the stobe flash would be hard to see, other than the highlighting and added color.

So how likely was that to be the case??? Actually, very likely.

The hard part in all of this is knowing what to set the strobe at, before the image is taken, so you can take images like the moving fish. My suggestion on that is to take a couple of exposure images to get yourself calibrated to the particular dive conditions, at the start of the dive.

RoyN
01-28-2008, 14:00
The fish butt image was taken by Kawika. :D

Wish that was mine, but that's his.

Puffer Fish
01-28-2008, 15:10
The fish butt image was taken by Kawika. :D

Wish that was mine, but that's his.
I expect you to have thousands of your own like that in the future...

RoyN
02-04-2008, 01:16
Looks like I'm back in business. Now the strobe is still in question since the seller who was going to sell me a strobe flaked out on me.

RoyN
02-04-2008, 01:27
What is sad is I sold the SL961D thinking that deal with that guy would go through, guess that blew me in the face. :S Anyways, I think the YS-27DX would be the one for me unless someone donates me some $$$$ for the YS-110

tbg0519
03-03-2008, 15:01
Can I use an underwater light on a camera mount rather than a strobe for taking pictures underwater, or do I really need a strobe instead? Getting my annual bonus and making my wishlist early. Any help is appreciated.

dbh
03-03-2008, 20:03
Can I use an underwater light on a camera mount rather than a strobe for taking pictures underwater, or do I really need a strobe instead? Getting my annual bonus and making my wishlist early. Any help is appreciated.

An underwater light is only useful for assistance with focusing. It is not powerful enough to replace a strobe.

Dave

Puffer Fish
03-04-2008, 12:04
Can I use an underwater light on a camera mount rather than a strobe for taking pictures underwater, or do I really need a strobe instead? Getting my annual bonus and making my wishlist early. Any help is appreciated.

An underwater light is only useful for assistance with focusing. It is not powerful enough to replace a strobe.

Dave

I will second that.

tbg0519
03-06-2008, 08:48
Thanks guys. What's a good starter strobe? Not looking to spend a small fortune. Using with a Canon SD750 w/ housing.

Puffer Fish
03-06-2008, 15:35
Thanks guys. What's a good starter strobe? Not looking to spend a small fortune. Using with a Canon SD750 w/ housing.
Ok, well that can be a bit difficult....

The best (that I know of) are the S&S YS110 or the Inon. And both cost a fair amount of money.

There is the new SL961, which I have not tried (Larry or Joe, I'm sure could help with that.

If you just want a flash.. then the S&S YS27 (I think that is correct) would work...with the more expensive ones you get a mimic function that reduces the camera's flash output (less heat and faster recycle) and provides a form of auto TTL (auto flash control). You don't get that with the 27, but it does work in manual.

Thanks to being able to get a discount here (I got both of my strobes from ST), I would first look at the ones they sell.

Looking that ST site, the SL961 (which includes the arm and tray) seems the low cost option.

dbh
03-06-2008, 20:24
It really bothers me that SL won't publish beam angle (coverage) and recycle time (I could not find it on their website). Also, 100 flashes per charged set of batteries is pathetic.

I am a firm believer that it is better to shoot with your internal flash and save for a good strobe. The Sea & Sea YS27-DX (~$400) is decent (490 flashes / charged set of batteries, 2 sec. recycle time and 84 x 105 beam coverage, but totally manual (which isn't all bad....makes you learn something). For $50 more, I would check out the Inon 2000S. It has 1.8 sec. recycle time, 510 flashes / charged set of batteries and 100 x 100 beam coverage. It also has a sTTL mode which works well (so I have read).

With MOST underwater photography gear (and especially strobes, IMHO), you get what you pay for.

YMMV,
Dave

RoyN
03-06-2008, 20:59
It really bothers me that SL won't publish beam angle (coverage) and recycle time (I could not find it on their website). Also, 100 flashes per charged set of batteries is pathetic.


From my first hand experiences with the SL961D, it was awful for wide angle. Here is my favorite dive site using the SL961D.

http://inlinethumb14.webshots.com/13517/2209697800101309303S425x425Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2209697800101309303jCXMrr)

And here is a sample picture using the YS-110

http://inlinethumb57.webshots.com/41144/2288578950101309303S425x425Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2288578950101309303OZVUzI)

The SL961 was great for macro and general pictures, but for wide angles, it was very questionable. I sold it after I got that circle light when using wide angle and I was so mad. Otherwise, like Dave said, its pretty much what you pay for. I would rather have save up for a good strobe and thats what I did. Very happy with it and with the new ultralight arm, now I should be able to get rid of those nasty backscatters! :smiley11:

JanPie
04-01-2008, 01:38
Dear all

(My first post on Scuba Toys)

I am pretty much of a newbie when it comes to underwater photography. I have only done a couple of dive holidays with a point & shoot (Sony W17). My eyes aren't as good as they used to be and this year I found that I couldn't see the camera settings very well underwater (reflection + small numbers + lack of LCD brightness in lower light situations).

My efforts with the Sony in Egypt are here: Marsa Alam - a photoset on Flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/janpie/sets/72157594145992414/)

I just purchased a Canon G9 and the Canon u/w housing as it seems to have a lot more manual control - and much larger figures on the LCD display.

Anyway, I want to go the next step and buy a strobe. I am still trying to learn about terms like TTL and slave and what they mean practically, i.e. what are the positives and negatives when you are actually shooting.

My budget is currently limited and I can only do max. one diving holiday a year. I have seen a strobe on the web called the Intova PX21 for a phenomenally low price compared to other strobes, but I never see a mention of it in forums, reviews or any other comments. Should I completely forget this? Is it a case of you get what you pay for and you might as well stick with your internal flash or pay for an Inon or Ikelite?

Any comments for someone who is looking to improve his current situation, but can't spend the earth?

Thank you in advance

Jan

DevilDiver
04-01-2008, 02:26
"I have seen a strobe on the web called the Intova PX21 for a phenomenally low price compared to other strobes, but I never see a mention of it in forums, reviews or any other comments. Should I completely forget this? Is it a case of you get what you pay for and you might as well stick with your internal flash or pay for an Inon or Ikelite?"

http://ak.buy.com/db_assets/prod_lrg_images/912/204710912.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:largeIM2('http://ak.buy.com/db_assets/large_images/912/204710912.jpg');hide('ppForm'))
A versatile slave flash designed for multiple purposes. The kit includes the slave flash, a waterproof housing (175 feet), mounting brackets for land and water use, flex arm, 3 flash diffusers and spare O-rings. An optional fiber optic cable is also available.

Welcome to the forum!! Nice photo's on FLICKR...

I have never run into this strobe before... I found it listed for $149. I would be surprised if this would offer a quality solution for UW photography. Could not find any more details so I don't want to bag on a product I don't really know about.

CompuDude
04-01-2008, 16:42
"I have seen a strobe on the web called the Intova PX21 for a phenomenally low price compared to other strobes, but I never see a mention of it in forums, reviews or any other comments. Should I completely forget this? Is it a case of you get what you pay for and you might as well stick with your internal flash or pay for an Inon or Ikelite?"

http://ak.buy.com/db_assets/prod_lrg_images/912/204710912.jpg (http://javascript<b></b>:largeIM2('http://ak.buy.com/db_assets/large_images/912/204710912.jpg');hide('ppForm'))
A versatile slave flash designed for multiple purposes. The kit includes the slave flash, a waterproof housing (175 feet), mounting brackets for land and water use, flex arm, 3 flash diffusers and spare O-rings. An optional fiber optic cable is also available.

Welcome to the forum!! Nice photo's on FLICKR...

I have never run into this strobe before... I found it listed for $149. I would be surprised if this would offer a quality solution for UW photography. Could not find any more details so I don't want to bag on a product I don't really know about.

Good little strobes for small P&S cameras. But it would be totally wasted on a G9. It's like putting a Tail fin from Pep Boys on a Ferrari.

JanPie
04-04-2008, 01:52
Thank you for comments. Compudude, I like the analogy.

Aussie
04-20-2008, 20:10
Can I use an underwater light on a camera mount rather than a strobe for taking pictures underwater, or do I really need a strobe instead? Getting my annual bonus and making my wishlist early. Any help is appreciated.

An underwater light is only useful for assistance with focusing. It is not powerful enough to replace a strobe.

Dave

I will second that.

Unless your underwater light is a 21w Salvo HID

Aussie