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dmdoss
07-22-2007, 20:05
Do you think ZM are a good or bad thing for diver's? They make the viz better, but they mess up the bottom and wrecks.

ScubaToys Larry
07-22-2007, 20:15
I know up in milwaukee, it's creating more work for divers. They have to send them in to clean the intakes for the water supply they get from Lake Michigan.

tc_rain
07-22-2007, 21:14
I think they are bad. Sure they clean the water so you can see better but what are you going to look at but clumps of zebra mussels <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

dmdoss
07-22-2007, 21:20
I know the local power plant has to use divers to clean the intakes here to. Seems like they would create a problem for dams.

tc_rain
07-22-2007, 21:24
Well on second thought, maybe they are good. They are creating jobs for the economy and diving jobs at that. <?:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

Dive-aholic
07-23-2007, 00:16
Bad. They change the environment. It may not be such a big deal in manmade lakes, but it's becoming a big problem in the great lakes. The predatory status of many of the indigenous life is changing because of ZMs.

TAH 73
07-23-2007, 07:11
In our area (just off Lake Ontario) they have completely changed an ecosystem, a sportfishing industry has collapsed, due to the fish leaving due to increased water clarity. The increased water clarity has also allowed seaweed to grow in areas where it wasn't, and with a good portion of the bay being around 15/20ft huge areas of expensive waterfront are weed-choked.
<DIV>The seaweed grows up in the spring/early summer to the surface, later in the summer when the water level drops you end up with a large surface mat that dies, rots and smells, as well as trapping all types of surface debris.</DIV>
<DIV>Zebra mussels also have very sharp edges on their shellsthat are hell on wetsuits and gloves. </DIV>
<DIV>At my parents place we spent thousand of dollars having a channel dredged out to be able to get the boat slip/ dock area deep enough that the seaweed was at a depth that it wouldn't create a surface mat.</DIV>
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Moxie
07-23-2007, 08:20
Zebra mussels can tear through your trilam drysuit too! They are nasty. I used to see people taking their boats out of the great lakes and then heading north to cottage country with out scraping their boats. It's a nice way to transfer the pests into a closed system.
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<DIV>ZM were beginning to clog up intakes/outputs when I left Ontario and were destroying the balance. Gobey's too. Blech.</DIV>
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<DIV>They cover the wrecks so that the structure can't be seen and once they're on a wreck, you can't take em off. There are few uncolonized wrecks left. The last one I saw was the Niagara II.</DIV>

DirtyWaterIL
07-30-2007, 18:10
THE PROBLEM WITH ZEBRA MUSCLES IS NOW EVERY WRECK IN THE GREAT LAKES LOOKS LIKE THEYVE BEEN CANDY COATED IN SUNFLOWER SEEDS. lUCKILY i HAVENT CUT UP MY DRYSUIT ON THEM YET. i GUESS IT'S JUST MORE INCENTIVE TO MAINTAIN PROPER BUOYANCY CONTROL.

DirtyWaterIL
07-30-2007, 18:11
zebra muscles have also taken a toll on my capslock key, they have encrusted it forcing it to come on at bad times.

Black-Gorrilla
07-30-2007, 18:14
are these things eatable?

TAH 73
07-30-2007, 20:45
are these things eatable?

Nope they are tiny, most about the size if a fingernail, and the shell is very thin, thus the reason they are so sharp.

texdiveguy
07-30-2007, 20:49
About the only thing ZM will not stick to is brass. To answer the OP--they are bad.

dmdoss
07-30-2007, 21:10
Well just for the record I don't like them either.

cummings66
07-31-2007, 07:28
I don't think many people like the Zebra mussel, they do clean the water up but make everything else nasty with their bodies incrusting it and get rid of fish.

rfb3
01-14-2008, 12:51
zebra muscles have also taken a toll on my capslock key, they have encrusted it forcing it to come on at bad times.


Oh, that's funny!!!

Tom A
01-14-2008, 13:16
there in one lake here in kansas they think they will strat plug up the water pumps

UCFKnightDiver
01-14-2008, 14:44
are the indigenous? or were they brought here and is there anything we can or should do to kill them off?

rfb3
01-14-2008, 15:20
They came from Asia, and nothing eats them. That's the problem. They are tremendous filter feeders, so as divers they are a good thing. However, water that is too clean will not sustain other forms of life, that's the bad thing.

Z-naught
01-14-2008, 15:42
Zebra mussels (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zebra_mussel) are native to the Black Sea region. They were introduced to North America by cargo vessels that stupidly discharged their ballast water in the lakes and streams they traversed. Then, boaters proceeded to spread them to other freshwater bodies via their uncleaned boats. The havoc these diminutive mussels have wreaked is immense (about 5 billion dollars worth every year according to the U.S.C.G.).

rfb3
01-14-2008, 15:45
We got a new guy on our dock (Lake Texoma) last year from Michigan. His boat had ZM'sbu the game warden caught him before he launched his boat. Cost his several hundred to get them extricated.

BuzzF117
01-14-2008, 16:31
I have heard reports the Zebra Mussels have cross breed with native mussels in the Upper Great lakes but I haven't ever had it confirmed by either a biologist or Dept of Natural Resources.

UCFKnightDiver
01-14-2008, 16:36
ok well do they survive down here in the warm waters of the south and if so have they made it here I am in florida and untill recently I hadnt heard of the problem

DUnder
01-14-2008, 16:41
They are not native to the US, they do more harm then good. As most other replies have pointed out.

WV Diver
01-14-2008, 16:41
Zebra mussels are bad................m'kay!!!

I am a mussel biologist and I can tell you that they are bad news. Znaught's post is accurate and they are not breeding with native mussels.

Actually we had a pretty big discussion on here somewhere about introducing zebs into a quarry.

The long and short of it is that they are a bad financial issue to business and a big problem to native mussels and the ecosystems of any aquatic environment they come into contact with.

texdiveguy
01-14-2008, 16:52
Anyone have a recipe for those little SOB's!!

snagel
01-14-2008, 16:54
For sake of argument, I have to believe that mother nature has a funny way of taking care of herself. So, what is there that will keep the ZM's in check? Are we destined to believe that at some point all bodies of water will be filled with ZM's?

Also, several posts state that they are transferred from body of water to another by hitchhiking on boats - I believe this to be true. But, don't they also get transplanted by birds and such?

S. Nagel

Formerly 45yroldNewbie
01-14-2008, 17:02
For sake of argument, I have to believe that mother nature has a funny way of taking care of herself. So, what is there that will keep the ZM's in check? Are we destined to believe that at some point all bodies of water will be filled with ZM's?

Also, several posts state that they are transferred from body of water to another by hitchhiking on boats - I believe this to be true. But, don't they also get transplanted by birds and such?

S. Nagel

Not sure about the birds and such but I know they transfer not only on the outside of boats and from the ballast discharge from freighters, but most boaters don't empty all the water from their I/O engine intakes and then when they start up in a different lake the little sob's go shooting out the discharge. You have to watch your water jackets closely as they can and do build up inside your engine.

WV Diver
01-14-2008, 17:12
They are very resilient and they are very prolific. They hitch hike on practically any surface that touches the water and they can be dry for a period of time and survive. They get carried on boats and trailers especially trailers with carpeted running boards that take up water. And they can be transfered a hundred other ways as well. If it is wet it is contaminated.

This is all done and you can't even see them. As I mentioned they are prolific and multiply much easier than the native mussels as they don't need a fish host to complete their life cycles. The babies, called veligers, are too small to see in the early stages of life.

mitchy
01-14-2008, 18:02
Not a big fan of them either. I do a lot of wreck diving, and the boats are 100% covered in them. Lines too. Spend the whole dive trying no to cut myself on them. Sure they make the water clear, so I have a better view of... zebra mussels.

snagel
01-14-2008, 18:07
What a vicious circle - you can't see anything because the water is too "mucky", but the ZM's clean the water so you have "good" viz, but what you see is everything incrusted in ZM's.

I guess pick your poison.

S. Nagel

Crimediver
01-14-2008, 18:19
Millbrook dive quarry in Manassas VA had some ZM "introduced" into it. It cost tons of $$$ to have the mussels poisoned. They are the first zebras introduced into VA and have hopefully been killed of by the Va Dept. of Fish and Game. But I suspect there is at least one other quarry around with some. Unscrupulous divers like the way they clear up the viz and bring them into places illegally.

whse56
01-14-2008, 18:21
What controls them in their home enviroment? There must be something that eats or controls them,something like a coyote to a rabbit.

cummings66
01-14-2008, 18:33
The other day I saw a coyote at 50 feet eating a muscle. Well, seriously I don't know what their predator is in their native habit which is overseas. Google I guess would tell me. I suspect a type of fish eats them.

UCFKnightDiver
01-14-2008, 20:42
some ducks and a couple fish eat them when i googled it but they dont eat them enough

captain
01-14-2008, 22:17
ok well do they survive down here in the warm waters of the south and if so have they made it here I am in florida and untill recently I hadnt heard of the problem

They are in the Mississippi River as far south as New Orleans. The industries along the river have to add biocide to the water from the river to prevent them from plugging up their equipment