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JipThePeople
07-23-2007, 00:07
If I have not come within 2 of the decompression time on the dive table and I have only descended to a max depth of ~35 feet, is a 3-minute safety stop still recommended? Or is it a good rule of thumb even for dives with such a shallow max depth?

picxie
07-23-2007, 04:42
I don't know the answer to that but I do try and do a safety stop on all dives. Good habit to get into (IMO) and I like to practice my buoyancy (sp?) without having to hold onto a line.

woody
07-23-2007, 06:50
If I have not come within 2 of the decompression time on the dive table
It's a PADI table thing. Safety stops are 'Required if within 2 pressure groups of an NDL and any diver 100' ro greater.'


and I have only descended to a max depth of ~35 feet, is a 3-minute safety stop still recommended? Or is it a good rule of thumb even for dives with such a shallow max depth?

Stop on every dive! Slow your ascent rates. Less than 30' per minute. You can also introduce NAUI's rule of halves on your safety stop / ascents.

This is how it works. Take you max depth (Anything over 40') on that dive and divide it in half. At that depth you will stop for 1 minute and then ascend to your 15' mark and complete the rest of you Safety stop. i.e. 60' max depth /2 = 30' You would do your first stop at 30' for 1 minute and then slowly ascend to 15' and do 2 more minutes for a total of 3 minutes in safety stop time.

Thanks,
Woody

medic001918
07-23-2007, 07:16
I think that any dive you have the chance to practice a safety stop, you should do it. It's an additional margin of safety, as well as a chance to work on your bouyancy a little bit. Plus if you get in the habit of doing them every time, you'll never forget to do one when you should.
<DIV>
Shane</DIV>

JipThePeople
07-23-2007, 08:04
Thanks for the resonses. Since my dive computer was not registering the need for a safety stop when diving 35mx depth I was curious. Sounds like its a good idea no matter what as well as a good opportunity to practice buoyancy skills.

TAH 73
07-23-2007, 09:22
Just hang out and play rock/paper/scissors.
<DIV></DIV>

fire diver
07-23-2007, 09:59
If I have not come within 2 of the decompression time on the dive table and I have only descended to a max depth of ~35 feet, is a 3-minute safety stop still recommended? Or is it a good rule of thumb even for dives with such a shallow max depth?

For a dive that shallow, it's not really needed, but do it anyway. It's good to be in the habit of always doing a safety stop.

Use the time to practice your bouyancy. Try to hang without moving up or down, and without using your fins or hands. The trick I was taught for that.... focus on the particles in the water. If you look a few inches in from of your mask you will see tiny particles no matter how clear the water is. These are stable in the water for all practicle matters. You watch these as you breath. You will see the instant you start to move. Way better practice than looking at your depth guage.

I don't know what the latest teaching doctrine is, but I always do half-depth stops for one minute on all my NDL dives. Then I like to hang at the safety for about 5 minutes if I have been down past about 80. I know it's over-kill, but what the hey, it stretches my dive times. And I get too few many dives in a year as it is.

FD

tc_rain
07-23-2007, 11:34
I always do a SS if I am greater then 50' for an extended time (several minutes) or within 2 PG. I will usually do my SS while swimming at 15' rather then just hanging there if there is something to look at.

TxHockeyGuy
07-23-2007, 11:57
If I have not come within 2 of the decompression time on the dive table
It's a PADI table thing. Safety stops are 'Required if within 2 pressure groups of an NDL and any diver 100' ro greater.'


and I have only descended to a max depth of ~35 feet, is a 3-minute safety stop still recommended? Or is it a good rule of thumb even for dives with such a shallow max depth?

Stop on every dive! Slow your ascent rates. Less than 30' per minute. You can also introduce NAUI's rule of halves on your safety stop / ascents.

This is how it works. Take you max depth (Anything over 40') on that dive and divide it in half. At that depth you will stop for 1 minute and then ascend to your 15' mark and complete the rest of you Safety stop. i.e. 60' max depth /2 = 30' You would do your first stop at 30' for 1 minute and then slowly ascend to 15' and do 2 more minutes for a total of 3 minutes in safety stop time.

Thanks,
Woody

Was that a typo? I've never heard of cutting your 3 minute safety stop at 15' short when doing deep stops (rule of halves). I thought it was cut your depth in half, stop a minute, head to 15' and do 3 minutes there (or I'll do 5 if I was pushing limits). Am I just remembering this wrong?

WaterRat
07-23-2007, 12:08
It is wise to practice on every dive. You don't want to be rusty on this skill when you need it. You want to be rock solid on the safety stops when you need them.

Ron

JahJahwarrior
07-23-2007, 13:44
One place I dove recently had multiple platforms in the water for class work, etc. The one at 20 feet was perfect for safety stops. Also, they had brushes clipped to the lines holding the platfom in place, so if you got bored, you could clean their platform for them :)

woody
07-23-2007, 16:25
Was that a typo? I've never heard of cutting your 3 minute safety stop at 15' short when doing deep stops (rule of halves). I thought it was cut your depth in half, stop a minute, head to 15' and do 3 minutes there (or I'll do 5 if I was pushing limits). Am I just remembering this wrong?


No, Not a typo. You are just moving 1 of your minutes to the safety stop. Please feel free to add that minute back at 15' if you want too. Itjust helps out.

Warren
07-23-2007, 16:49
Just hang out and play rock/paper/scissors.


http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/smileys/smiley20.gif

Great idea! http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/smileys/smiley32.gif

TxHockeyGuy
07-23-2007, 17:10
Was that a typo? I've never heard of cutting your 3 minute safety stop at 15' short when doing deep stops (rule of halves). I thought it was cut your depth in half, stop a minute, head to 15' and do 3 minutes there (or I'll do 5 if I was pushing limits). Am I just remembering this wrong?


No, Not a typo. You are just moving 1 of your minutes to the safety stop. Please feel free to add that minute back at 15' if you want too. Itjust helps out.

Thanks for the confirmation. I'll keep doing at least 3 at 15' and make my computer happy.

picxie
07-24-2007, 05:24
Just hang out and play rock/paper/scissors.


Or noughts & crosses on a dive slate http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/smileys/smiley1.gif

cummings66
07-24-2007, 12:53
I think the games at the safety stop are a great idea and I'm going to start playing tic tac toe there with my buddies.

CompuDude
07-24-2007, 17:52
Was that a typo? I've never heard of cutting your 3 minute safety stop at 15' short when doing deep stops (rule of halves). I thought it was cut your depth in half, stop a minute, head to 15' and do 3 minutes there (or I'll do 5 if I was pushing limits). Am I just remembering this wrong?


No, Not a typo. You are just moving 1 of your minutes to the safety stop. Please feel free to add that minute back at 15' if you want too. Itjust helps out.
I've never heard that, either. I'd say full safety stop no matter what, gas permitting.

I have, however, started breaking up my safety stop (in addition to a 1 min deep stop at the 1/2way point). It's supposed to be done between 20'-10', so I've started doing 2 minutes at 20' and the final minute at 10', and then ascending super slow. Great practice for buoyancy, and some studies have shown being slightly deeper on the safety stop is a good thing.

woody
07-27-2007, 04:48
I've never heard that, either. I'd say full safety stop no matter what, gas permitting.
it's a NAUI thing. It has been publish in the Instructors Magazine. I'll see if I can find it anywhere else. I think that it was published in Dive Training Magazine also.

Thanks,
Woody.

Black-Gorrilla
07-27-2007, 07:16
EDITED FOR STUPID... im gonna waterproof a gameboy.

techgnostic
07-27-2007, 14:31
Just hang out and play rock/paper/scissors.
<DIV></DIV>

So you can look like a couple of guys arguing about whether to stop, level out, or go over there? :p

techgnostic
07-27-2007, 14:32
im gonna waterproof a gameboy.

what a great idea...tie them off to the deco bottles

TxHockeyGuy
07-27-2007, 14:46
SSI teaches a 10-15min safety stop at 15' feet for any dive... im gonna waterproof a gameboy.

That seems rather excessive. I also did a quick search and am finding references to SSI recommending a 3-5 minute safety stop (which is the norm).

the gooch
07-27-2007, 15:05
Never heard of a 10-15 min SS from SSI.

thesmoothdome
07-27-2007, 15:08
As long as there is enough air in the tank, which there better be, I'm doing a safety stop. If for no other reason, it's a good chance to reflect on the dive.

Black-Gorrilla
07-27-2007, 19:36
Never heard of a 10-15 min SS from SSI.

correction on my behalf... my fault on this one. late post, tired and bored at work.
i was told, to do a 3-5 min. stop at 15', and if i came too close to ndl time, be it from going too deep or something caught my attention and deserved the extra time, that with air permiting do a ..to be on the more preservative side.
sorry about that. my fault.

cummings66
07-30-2007, 20:57
I found a reference for how Woody does his stops, apparently that's a pretty common technique for DIR divers. I don't know if other agencies teach it however.

I don't understand enough of this deco stuff to make sense of it yet, hopefully I will after I go through the courses but it does seem that technical divers do the stops differently when it's a deco dive. Of course all dives are that, just some more than others.

Moxie
07-30-2007, 23:39
I'm a safety stopper on all dives. Just works out better for me. My buoyancy is at it's worst at 15' so I can always use the practice. Other things I do include taking a mini siesta, playing games, watching fish, watching other divers, checking out the bottom of the boat....

Splitlip
08-04-2007, 22:26
SSI teaches a 10-15min safety stop at 15' feet for any dive... im gonna waterproof a gameboy.
Seriousely? That seems excessive for an added safety margin.
I smell litigation.

Splitlip
08-04-2007, 22:28
Never heard of a 10-15 min SS from SSI.

correction on my behalf... my fault on this one. late post, tired and bored at work.
i was told, to do a 3-5 min. stop at 15', and if i came too close to ndl time, be it from going too deep or something caught my attention and deserved the extra time, that with air permiting do a 10-15 min stop...to be on the more preservative side.
sorry about that. my fault.

Sorry. Did not get through the entire thread when I posted.

woody
08-05-2007, 05:00
I found a reference for how Woody does his stops, apparently that's a pretty common technique for DIR divers. I don't know if other agencies teach it however.
It's now something that NAUI is encouraging being taught at the Open Water Diver level. I make sure that it is done this way for the Deep Dive on the advanced class and that the class knows why it is being done that way.

Woody

Zenagirl
08-05-2007, 08:44
My "rule of thumb" is if I'm nitrogen loading, I'm doing a safety stop. I love it when dive sites have reefs at 20' or so and I can spend my safety stop snooping more. On dives without shallow reefs, I use the time to watch divers below and periodically scan the blue water...you never know what you'll see.

creggur
08-05-2007, 09:44
Just hang out and play rock/paper/scissors.
<DIV></DIV>

This is what my wife and I do... It's fun to try and hover at 15' while playing..

awap
08-05-2007, 10:48
I often dive a river that is quite shallow - median depth around 6 ft. The hardest part is planning the dive so you end up in an area that has over 15 ft of water. wink/wink

Safety stops are a good habit to get into. But for most dives less than 30 ft with no significant nitrogen loading to start with....

ianr33
08-05-2007, 11:00
It's a PADI table thing. Safety stops are 'Required if within 2 pressure groups of an NDL and any diver 100' ro greater.'


This always amuses me.

what is the difference between a "required safety stop" and a "decompression stop"? :smiley36:

JCAT
08-14-2007, 08:05
Just hang out and play rock/paper/scissors.
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV></DIV>
<DIV>Or noughts &amp; crosses on a dive slate http://www.scubatoys.com/forum/smileys/smiley1.gif</DIV>

Hang on your back and blow air rings.

Buoyant1
08-14-2007, 08:42
The guys I dive with always do a 3 minute at 15...if we've spent any time at a considerable depth, we always try to do a minute at 20 as well even though our dives are so multi-level that it really doesn't matter...it's just a good habit to get yourself into.

CompuDude
08-14-2007, 12:44
[quote=JipThePeople]
It's a PADI table thing. Safety stops are 'Required if within 2 pressure groups of an NDL and any diver 100' ro greater.'


This always amuses me.

what is the difference between a "required safety stop" and a "decompression stop"? :smiley36:
A safety stop is recommended. A decompression stop is mandatory. A "Required" safety stop, however, is essentially a deco stop, you're correct. It's just phrased in less scary language, so that they can continue to say you are diving within no deco limits.

cgvmer
08-14-2007, 13:11
good habit to keep

BuzzGA
08-25-2007, 22:28
I always do a safety stop, even on a shallow dive. If nothing else it is a chance to make sure I didn't drop anything or to make sure everything is tucked away so it won't get caught on boat ladders etc...

Jaymeany
08-25-2007, 22:40
I like to get in the habit of it unless we are at 20-30 ft for a short period.

gtjason2000
08-25-2007, 22:43
my computer likes it when i do a safety stop so I usually comply except when diving 20' for 20 minutes.

Phestr
08-25-2007, 23:14
We almost always do them, but our dives are typically 60ft. We use it to work on bouyancy control, as we are frequently with at least one diver straight out of OW.

greyzen
08-25-2007, 23:19
I like the air ring trick...buoyancy control is important too I guess

Kingpatzer
08-26-2007, 12:34
If I have not come within 2 of the decompression time on the dive table and I have only descended to a max depth of ~35 feet, is a 3-minute safety stop still recommended? Or is it a good rule of thumb even for dives with such a shallow max depth?

I do a safety stop for all dives 10m and deeper. It's only 3 minutes, and I'd rather be under 3 minutes longer than be bent.

wgt
09-17-2007, 11:38
Emerging wisdom indicates benefits of a deep stop before the conventional safety stop. The procedure evidently reduces bubbling as measured in the right side of the heart by Doppler. The depth of the first stop is determined by 1/2 of maximal depth. Thus, a dive to 18 m (60 ft), for example, would be met with a deep stop at 9 m (30 ft) followed by the conventional 3-min stop at 4.5 m (15 ft). I presume that further study will suggest modified parameters/rules for relatively shallow dives and also dives that push the limits of recreational depths. Nevertheless, in the depth ranges that I tend to occupy (15 - 30 m or 50 - 100 ft), I invariably use the half-maximal depth for a deep stop. The diver is obviously wise to ensure that he/she will have sufficient air to observe planned safety measures on ascent. As for the consumption of yet more dive time on safety stops, very cool stuff happens near the surface, depending on the dive site.

The other important thing to note is that safety stops, however meticulously observed, cannot guarantee the avoidance of decompression sickness.

Boris42
10-01-2007, 10:14
If I have not come within 2 of the decompression time on the dive table
It's a PADI table thing. Safety stops are 'Required if within 2 pressure groups of an NDL and any diver 100' ro greater.'


and I have only descended to a max depth of ~35 feet, is a 3-minute safety stop still recommended? Or is it a good rule of thumb even for dives with such a shallow max depth?

Stop on every dive! Slow your ascent rates. Less than 30' per minute. You can also introduce NAUI's rule of halves on your safety stop / ascents.

This is how it works. Take you max depth (Anything over 40') on that dive and divide it in half. At that depth you will stop for 1 minute and then ascend to your 15' mark and complete the rest of you Safety stop. i.e. 60' max depth /2 = 30' You would do your first stop at 30' for 1 minute and then slowly ascend to 15' and do 2 more minutes for a total of 3 minutes in safety stop time.

Thanks,
Woody

Great post! Why was this not covered in my OW training? My buddy and I had 3 dives this past weekend, all under 60' (70', 62' and 85') I guess in a way we did since we swam out and back to our deepest point from about 30' each time. But it seems like something that should be covered. Thanks for the info.

Dave

jwdizney
10-01-2007, 10:28
I agree with the consensus that a safety stop can't hurt, even after a 25-30' dive, unless, of course, air supply is an issue, in which case you should monitor your air closer. it's definitely a great opportunity to do a little buoyancy work, or other skills with your buddy too. definitely included in my dive plans.....

ccarter
10-01-2007, 10:31
I agree with the consensus that a safety stop can't hurt, even after a 25-30' dive, unless, of course, air supply is an issue, in which case you should monitor your air closer. it's definitely a great opportunity to do a little buoyancy work, or other skills with your buddy too. definitely included in my dive plans.....
I usually always make a safety stop..

ianr33
10-01-2007, 11:01
Great post! Why was this not covered in my OW training? My buddy and I had 3 dives this past weekend, all under 60' (70', 62' and 85') I guess in a way we did since we swam out and back to our deepest point from about 30' each time. But it seems like something that should be covered. Thanks for the info.

Dave

Well, OW is only supposed to cover diving down to 60 feet. Half of 60 feet is 30 which is pretty much in your "safety stop" zone

Deepstops only really apply to deeper dives.

DZorn00
10-02-2007, 16:02
I think that any dive you have the chance to practice a safety stop, you should do it. It's an additional margin of safety, as well as a chance to work on your bouyancy a little bit. Plus if you get in the habit of doing them every time, you'll never forget to do one when you should.
<DIV>
Shane</DIV>

I would definately have to agree with this. Stop everytime so that it becomes natural for you every time you dive. Keeps the guess work out of it.

tbuckalew
10-02-2007, 18:38
Deep stops are encouraged and taught by NAUI, but they didn't come from NAUI. Deep stops arose from the RGBM study of bubble formation using doppler (just covered quite well a few posts ago).

Bottom, line, it is called a SAFETY stop for an added margin of safety. For the Deep stop, spend a minute doing nothing physical at half your deepest depth. Then proceed to your 15' level for your 3 to 5 minute safety stop. Of course, if you dive a computer, and the computer recommends a stop at a deeper depth, do so first.

In any event, there were some great suggestions as to what to do during your safety stop. The whole idea is to help prevent the onset of DCS. As different people are more or less susceptible than others, it is always a good ideas to err on the safe side.

BobArnold8265
10-05-2007, 11:48
Why risk it. I do a 3 minute safety stop on every dive regardless of my depth or time. Besides, it's a good excuse for staying in the water and extra 3 minutes !!! I've seen all sorts of interesting things during my stops.

dogseatmayo
08-05-2008, 17:15
safety stops aren't required. they're just recomended and they really help to decraese the liklihood that you'll get decompression sickness when you dive. so no, you don't have to do a 3 min safety stop, but it is always a good idea

Jenn
08-05-2008, 18:46
I personally do a safety stop on every dive. Its a good habit to get into. I am a new diver and I was taught to always do a safety stop. Why not get into that habit better to be over protective then under.

character157
08-05-2008, 19:36
I make the safety stop part of the dive and do my best never to miss it. A shallow dive for a short time would probably be fine without it but I still wont take the chance-Better safe than sorry.

Trey9123
08-05-2008, 19:44
I usually do one if I go deeper than 60'.

crgjpg
08-05-2008, 20:06
I do a safety stop no matter what depth just to keep in habit of doing one.

fisheater
08-06-2008, 00:28
safety stops aren't required. they're just recomended.

Actually, PADI requires a safety stop for (a) all dives 100' or deeper and (b) all dives coming within 3 pressure groups of the NDL.

hooligan
08-06-2008, 02:53
Safety stop? What's a safety stop? :smilie40:

obrules15
08-06-2008, 08:43
I just think it makes good basic sense-- semantics aside. It's only three minutes and its good to develop the habits now as opposed to trying to remember them later.

P.S. Good buoyancy practice as well.

mm_dm
08-06-2008, 08:55
I just think it makes good basic sense-- semantics aside. It's only three minutes and its good to develop the habits now as opposed to trying to remember them later.

P.S. Good buoyancy practice as well.


Agreed. In a study covered in scubadiving magazine a couple of years ago it was stated that the nitrogen bubble attains most of its' growth in the area from 15 feet deep to the surface. Give yourself the 3 minutes to off gas some more and TAKE YOUR TIME ascending to the surface. Nitrogen micro bubbles are like ex-significant others, they have a way of coming out of nowhere when you least expect it.

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
08-06-2008, 10:06
I take stops very seriously since I am typically riding the NDLs at depths between 100 and 130. For the last several of months I have been making deep stops, ascending no faster than 30 ft per minute to 30 ft depth. I consider 30 ft the beginning of my safety stop- I pause there, proceed to 20 ft, pause there, proceed very slowly to 10 feet, pause there, and then take at least a full minute to ascend from 10 ft to the surface.

Since I started this routine I feel less 'wiped out' after a dive. I never get bored since I am easily amused but often I will be the only one on the line and pelagic species frequently come check me out. Doing my 30 ft stop in the middle of a huge school of shining amberjack is one of my best memories. It's like I was one of them. Their scales and my bublles were twinkling in the light. I also fondly remember doing my deep stop within air share distance of a great barracuda. My "buddy" missed these things because he motored up the line, and did his 3 minute hang on the bar with the crowd.

Avoid the crowd, take your time ascending and look around, you might just see something AND reduce your bubble formation.

No Misses
08-06-2008, 12:25
I try to do slow ascents and safety stops on every dive.

As for the comment that you should go especially slow from 10' to the surface; yes this is a good practice in that it helps reduce bubble formation. Unfortunately, this has other hazards. In areas of high boat traffic, the most dangerous time is when you are ascending from 10’ to the surface. If you do not have a dive flag (buoy) or the boat driver just doesn’t see it. It is very easy to get run over. Most agencies state that you should stop and listen for approaching motor noise. This is all fine as long as you have managed your gas and can hang until all motor noise has receded. Around here, every googan with a motor yacht wants to run right down the reef line, so that people on the beach can look at them and be envious. I have seen motor yachts run right over dive flags. It must be hard to watch where you are going, when you are being served a martini by your hoochy mama. (That is enough googan bashing. I can feel my aura turning dark. J) The moral of the story is…Be careful out there. Don’t expect your dive flag to protect you from irresponsible boaters.

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
08-06-2008, 13:15
Yes, there are sometimes reasons you might want to reach the surface fairly quickly. Boat traffic is a good reason you might want to ascend more quickly.

There is not any boat traffic where I dive (20 to 50 miles offshore). However, there can be current and big seas. Once the current was taking me past the end of the tag line. Rather than risk going adrift in the open ocean I ascended faster so I could grab the line, reasoning that it's probably safer to ascend a little faster than to work hard against the current.

Also, my son once did not finish his ascent prior to being swept 20-30 feet beyond the float at the end of the tag line. I was ascending beside him and saw what was happening so I basically shot up the rmaining few feet, grabbed hold of the float and prepared to tie off my reel so I could swim out to help him if need be. He struggled some to swim that distance against the current but he made it. We were the last two out of the water so we just held on to the rope while the mate pulled us back to the boat.

sravin1
08-06-2008, 13:31
we just got back from key largo, where the dive master told us that since we would be diving to a max of 45ft, safety stops were not required. I did do mine, but most other divers skipped it.

CompuDude
08-06-2008, 14:15
we just got back from key largo, where the dive master told us that since we would be diving to a max of 45ft, safety stops were not required. I did do mine, but most other divers skipped it.

He's technically correct... they're not "required" unless, as was pointed out earlier, you go below 100' or within 3 pressure groups of Z.

It's still good practice, though, to do it anyway. Although I don't think I'd bother if the dive was more like 30' and less.

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
08-06-2008, 15:06
If I recall, PADI recommends a safety stop on any dive exceeding 35 fsw. It's "mandatory" on any dive:

1. exceeding 100 fsw, or
2. coming within 3 pressure groups of the NDL, or
3. reaching any limit on the RDP or your dive computer.

bubbletrubble
08-06-2008, 16:11
For some of the newer divers on the Board, I have a safety stop scenario for you to consider...

Let's say you have been on a dive at 60fsw for 10 minutes and you become separated from your buddy. You look around for him/her for 30 seconds to 1 minute. You still can't find your buddy. What kind of dive profile would you adopt to the surface? Would your profile be different if you had been down at 60fsw for 30 minutes? Or 30fsw for 10 minutes? Or 100fsw for 4 minutes?

These are good scenarios to discuss with a new buddy before you get wet.

Grin
08-07-2008, 09:51
I always do my 3 min safety stop starting at 20 ft and coming up a foot every 30 seconds. Then, when my 3 minutes is up, I'm at 14-15 ft. I then take about 2 minutes to come to the surface from there.
From a 35 ft dive I would, personally, not do the safety stop, but I would accend super slow as if I were doing a accent from my safety stop.
Any which way you look at it, the difference between being super conservative, and just normal, is only a couple minutes for any dive other than deco diving. But 90% of divers choose to not be super conservative.

Many use the thought process about gassing off Nitrogen as their thought plan on accent. Time at safety stop depths keeps the computer happy and addresses specs on how much Nitrogen you offgassed. But many move real fast between their stops. That promotes bubble formation. And once bubbles form they don't go away easily. Even if you go back down they don't go away easy. And the closer you are to the surface the easier they form.
I use the theroy of not letting nitrogen form into bubbles to begin with. A slow steady accent addresses minimum bubble formation. I am not as concerned about how much Nitrogen I offgas. I just don't want it bubbling. But my method does a great job of off gassing nitrogen anyway / also.

Just a mere couple minutes extra is all!

navyhmc
08-07-2008, 12:58
When I first started diving, safety stops were unheard of. You were either in deco or you weren't. 100' for 10 minutes was ok, 12 minutes was bad and you did 3 minutes at 10'. When SS's wer adopted, I thought they were a great idea, anything to increase safety. As a result of this new dive enlightenment, I started doing safety stops.

The deep stops (pyle stops) were introduced, I thought these made great sense too. It didn't matter that there was no hard scientific proof for these, to me it made sense, and it increased safety. This is a good thing. I even have a chart for each 10' depth below 50' for how many deep stops amd at what depth.

If you are curious about deep stops: Deep Decompression Stops (http://www.bishopmuseum.org/research/treks/palautz97/deepstops.html) Not too long of a read.

Daved
08-09-2008, 12:53
You guys are getting me all tingly just talking about not stopping. For the dive operator in Key Largo--they need to look at accumulation of multi day diving. Do the safety stop. It is three whole minutes of your life not sitting on a dive boat listening to people who---well they sound better underwater.

mrbheagney
09-04-2008, 03:07
I always make a stop just to be conservative.

dwatts
09-04-2008, 10:53
In fact, just the other weekend I was driving out to a quarry and when I knew that I was only a few miles away, I pulled the car over for a quick safety stop.

......huh? Underwater? Ohhhhhhh...you guys are talking about THAT kind of safety stop. :smiley9:

Ah, yeah, I do those, too! All seriousness aside, I think making the SS a habit just makes good sense. It makes it one less thing to think about...you just always do it.

jbanks27
09-05-2008, 10:29
For those of you who don't know the reason for 3 minutes, it is because that is the average amount of time it takes for your blood to completly circulate through your body 1 time. It is a matter of safety for off gassing and getting rid of the nitrogen accumulation that occurs during breathing compressed gasses.

:smiley20: Safety stops are allways a recommended practice and should simply be a part of your dive planning routine.

OTGav
09-05-2008, 11:11
This year and last year (once each year only) one buddy team from our club has had a "close encounter" with humpback whales while hanging on their saftey stop.

This is the reason we have to do them every dive............

Rockhound76
09-05-2008, 15:31
I do 15 minutes at 3'.

Isn't that right?

Maybe being lexdycsic has something to do with it?

petronius
10-27-2008, 00:46
I always do a 3+ minute stop ~15' if I've gone to 30' or deeper - it's a good opportunity for buoyancy practice, and it's also a part of the kelp forest that I often haven't explored on the dive. There are some really interesting things in that upper 15 feet - I've got the air, so why not use it?

Grizbear98
10-27-2008, 01:08
I've been in the habit of completing a 3 minute safety stop at 20-15 feet since completing my open water cert. It's just good practice and the computer on the school's equipment I dive with counts it off for me automatically at 20ft anyways. It's always better to be safe than sorry.

ndv21
10-27-2008, 10:40
Agreed!

SynCitizen
10-27-2008, 13:04
For those of you who don't know the reason for 3 minutes, it is because that is the average amount of time it takes for your blood to completly circulate through your body 1 time. It is a matter of safety for off gassing and getting rid of the nitrogen accumulation that occurs during breathing compressed gasses.


I didn't know that actually... Thanks for the info.

captain
10-29-2008, 17:57
Safety stops came about when it was discovered that most divers were not following the standard at the time 60 ft/min ascent rate. It was an attempt to slow down the ascent rate. I dived for many years before the SS came into being. This was on Navy tables which usually provided a greater margin of safety because of the depth and time steps. If you made a 55 foot dive for 50 minutes you had to use the 60 foot 60 minute limit but you were not near the limit. With the advent of the computer and the habit of riding the limit on the computer I feel divers are less safe and as a result should do a SS.
I don't always do an SS but I also don't ride the limit on the computer.

UCFKnightDiver
10-29-2008, 18:31
theoretically a 3min saftey stop is not necessarily optimal in all dive profiles, in extreme cases you could still be on gassing nitrogen I believe

:) sorry thought I would jump start the thread again.