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View Full Version : Apollo Bio Fin - Need help w/ options Pro/XT/Strap



KnottyKnotter
12-03-2007, 09:54
Very new to diving, yet, already sold on the Apollo Bio fins.

Need help with deciding straps. Appears for an additional $50 I can have the standard strap replaced with a spring "C" strap. I guess that means they keep the original strap.

Any opinions on ordering spring straps from Apollo at fin purchase, or ordering spring straps as separate purchase?

Also, have found the Pro and XT to be the same cost. As a beginner recreational diver, not sure I need the additional stiffness of the XT. Again, looking for opinions?

ScubaToys Larry
12-03-2007, 10:18
I'd tell you do the standard pro and not the XT. They are actually less efficient in the water, and you work harder with no real return... but some people like the "feel" of them better.

As far as the C straps... If you order them with the C straps - they are attached at the factory and there are no "buttons" to attach the normal strap to... If you do them after the fact, you have to cut off the button. So I'd say if you want springs... just order them that way - you'll save a few bucks and not have to do the cutting and drilling yourself.

Puffer Fish
12-03-2007, 10:20
Very new to diving, yet, already sold on the Apollo Bio fins.

Need help with deciding straps. Appears for an additional $50 I can have the standard strap replaced with a spring "C" strap. I guess that means they keep the original strap.

Any opinions on ordering spring straps from Apollo at fin purchase, or ordering spring straps as separate purchase?

Also, have found the Pro and XT to be the same cost. As a beginner recreational diver, not sure I need the additional stiffness of the XT. Again, looking for opinions?
Apollo makes great fins...and unless you are really big, would not think you would need the XT.

Regarding straps... springs are wonderful things and worth the money... but, you have to be careful to get the correct size, and it depends on the size of boot/sock and your foot. But if you get the correct size.. they are more than worth it.

KnottyKnotter
12-03-2007, 10:35
Thanks Scuba Toys Larry and Puffer Fish.

No I'm not real big. Sounds like the Pro's will be it.

However, "to mount" springs at factory or "not"; runs into that question, where's your "Spare" strap?

Mounting spring straps at the factory (cutting off the buttons) essentially sounds like if you have a problem, you have a problem. What would you do in the case of needing a spare? Whereas buying OMS/Manta type springs that use the buttons, and keeping the oribinal factory option, you would have a spare?

How important it is dealing with this quality fin? Is it even an issue?

ScubaToys Larry
12-03-2007, 13:00
The whole idea of bolted on spring straps is you will never need a spare. If you have that strap break... It's because a great white with titanium caps bit your foot... otherwise - they ain't coming off!

KnottyKnotter
12-03-2007, 13:41
Got it! Thanks Larry.

Don't forget, newbies sometimes have dumb questions...

I wasn't thinking spare for losing a strap, I figured spare for breaking a strap. I don't know how tough $50 fin straps are. Most fins I've owned didn't cost $50, and that included the strap. That's how I know they break; but I also know you get what you pay for.

Thanks Larry.

CompuDude
12-03-2007, 13:54
Agreed, go for the factory spring straps. There are a few stories where someone has managed to break a spring strap, but it's so exceeding rare it's essentially a non-issue. Once you try them you'll see.

ScubaJW
12-03-2007, 15:21
Just my advice if you didn't get the pro... If you get this: http://www.leisurepro.com/ProductImage/AQUEZP.html?PopUp=1, then it will wear your buttons in a few dives. I did that routine with my Apollo biofins and I will never do that again. I made my own spring straps, they work like a charm! It's very easy, if you wanted to know how I did it, then PM me.

ReefHound
12-03-2007, 16:09
Regular fin straps are rubber, spring straps are steel. I doubt you could break it if you tried. In any event, it's becomes a very low probability failure point.

Sure there is always something that can happen - I saw a guy break the ribs on a fin - but the only way to guarantee against everything is to bring a spare set of fins. Ditto for any other piece of equipment.

Sarah
12-03-2007, 17:10
Stainless steel can spring material can fatigue and the heat treatment process can accelerate that.

The REAL reason why people buy the steel spring footstraps is because they want to pimp their fins and be all high tech.....guys, admit it...but don't worry, we love you for being gear heads. :)

Puffer Fish
12-03-2007, 18:01
Stainless steel can spring material can fatigue and the heat treatment process can accelerate that.

The REAL reason why people buy the steel spring footstraps is because they want to pimp their fins and be all high tech.....guys, admit it...but don't worry, we love you for being gear heads. :)
Arggggggg.... actually, they don't trust the spring steel, and put a safety line inside the coil, just in case one does try to pull too hard.

The advantage, besides comfort... is that a coil will stretch a tremendous amount more than rubber will. With a rubber strap, you have do some combination of putting it on loose and tightening it up...putting the fin on and buckling up.. and when you take them off reversing the process, with a lot more chances to loose one of the parts.

CompuDude
12-03-2007, 18:34
Stainless steel can spring material can fatigue and the heat treatment process can accelerate that.

The REAL reason why people buy the steel spring footstraps is because they want to pimp their fins and be all high tech.....guys, admit it...but don't worry, we love you for being gear heads. :)

While I like the look just fine, it has far more to do with the ease of donning and doffing. Very important when trying to gear up/down on a pitching boat, and equally important when trying to get your fins on while dodging monster waves in the surf zone.

Rubber straps means: Undo strap (often on each side, insert foot, place strap on back of heel, adjust strap on both sides of the foot until just right. Done. Repeat for other foot.

Spring strap: Pull spring, insert foot, release spring. Done. Repeat for other foot.

I hate waiting for people who are messing with their rubber straps, especially when waves are crashing on me, or when I am standing in line at the boat's gate, sweating in the sun and wearing a heavy tank or three.

ReefHound
12-03-2007, 19:52
Arggggggg.... actually, they don't trust the spring steel, and put a safety line inside the coil, just in case one does try to pull too hard.

Just to clarify, the line (cave line, of course) is not there in case the steel breaks but to keep the spring from being overstretched. Metal only fatigues significantly when it is deformed beyond it's limits. A spring can last tens of thousands of cycles if not stretched beyond it's design, more than a diver could put on his straps in a lifetime.

Which brings up the point, anyone know if these Apollo C-springs have a safety line inside them? Most packaged ones I've seen don't, it's usually a feature of the DIY type.

What "heat treatment process"?

CompuDude
12-04-2007, 00:37
Arggggggg.... actually, they don't trust the spring steel, and put a safety line inside the coil, just in case one does try to pull too hard.

Just to clarify, the line (cave line, of course) is not there in case the steel breaks but to keep the spring from being overstretched. Metal only fatigues significantly when it is deformed beyond it's limits. A spring can last tens of thousands of cycles if not stretched beyond it's design, more than a diver could put on his straps in a lifetime.

Which brings up the point, anyone know if these Apollo C-springs have a safety line inside them? Most packaged ones I've seen don't, it's usually a feature of the DIY type.

What "heat treatment process"?

I had to go look to be sure, but yes, mine have a line inside (BioFin XT-C).

Puffer Fish
12-04-2007, 08:07
Arggggggg.... actually, they don't trust the spring steel, and put a safety line inside the coil, just in case one does try to pull too hard.

Just to clarify, the line (cave line, of course) is not there in case the steel breaks but to keep the spring from being overstretched. Metal only fatigues significantly when it is deformed beyond it's limits. A spring can last tens of thousands of cycles if not stretched beyond it's design, more than a diver could put on his straps in a lifetime.

Which brings up the point, anyone know if these Apollo C-springs have a safety line inside them? Most packaged ones I've seen don't, it's usually a feature of the DIY type.

What "heat treatment process"?
Apollo uses a spring limit line on all their springs... for the reason you pointed out... which is why I made the comment..don't know of anyone else that does...but it is a nice feature and costs to do (obviously).